<html><body><div style="color:#000; background-color:#fff; font-family:bookman old style, new york, times, serif;font-size:24px"><div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9378"><span id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9377">Lauren Stacy Berdy always says things very well here. </span></div><div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9378"><span id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9581">"Readers aren't drawn to these things. It is too much work." How true. More and more I find readers self congratulatory and superficial. reading things and discussing them so that they validate themselves instead of rising to a challenge.</span></div><div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9378" dir="ltr"><span id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9584">Anyway, Percy was surely a challenge for me, in every way. Yet somehow he fascinates me.</span></div><div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9378" dir="ltr"><span>Thank you for this letter.</span></div><div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9378" dir="ltr"><span>Janet Cantor</span></div><br>  <div style="font-family: bookman old style, new york, times, serif; font-size: 24px;" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9672"> <div style="font-family: HelveticaNeue, Helvetica Neue, Helvetica, Arial, Lucida Grande, sans-serif; font-size: 16px;" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9671"> <div dir="ltr" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9670"> <hr size="1">  <font size="2" face="Arial" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9673"> <b><span style="font-weight:bold;">From:</span></b> Lauren Stacy Berdy <lauren.stacy.berdy@gmail.com><br> <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b> Percy-L: Literary and Philosophical Discussion <percy-l@lists.ibiblio.org> <br> <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Tuesday, October 6, 2015 11:12 AM<br> <b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> Re: [percy-l] A New Member and a Question<br> </font> </div> <div class="y_msg_container" id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9674"><br><div id="yiv5917098894">
  
    
  
  <div id="yui_3_16_0_1_1444172678857_9675">
    Dear Mr. Kobre,<br>
    <br>
    <br>
    Dr Percy knew that our thoughts are illusions. (all those questions
    of his brought us back on ourselves) <br>
    <br>
     Above all he also knew that Kierkegaard was onto something when he
    wrote that the work of religions in natural man leads him to<br>
    to the acquisition of the self ( soul) and the attainment of
    freedom. This last word is the most important word for me about Dr
    Percy. He pointed a way towards freedom. He showed that we cannot
    see our own nothingness without submission to something higher. What
    one loves about Dr Percy is the transformation part. Mans possible
    freedom.<br>
    The <i>search</i> is the search for our soul. Dr Percy gave us a
    taste of our human ableness. <br>
    Readers aren't drawn to these things. Its too much work. <br>
    And yet....... let us not forget that "The Moviegoer" too had
    disappeared from just about everyone's sight before it was seen
    anew.<br>
    <br>
    and about Bakhtin<br>
    The ever changing boundary where two people meet is a most important
    occurrence in the novels. ( think Sutter Vaught and Barrett, in "The
    Last Gentleman") <br>
    He takes dialogue seriously.<br>
    Something exchanged between two people is better than a monologue.
    You exchange news. What you do with it is another thing....... <br>
    <br>
    Good wishes<br>
    <br>
    <div class="yiv5917098894moz-cite-prefix">On 10/6/2015 7:29 AM, Leslie Marsh
      wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote type="cite">
      <div dir="ltr">Hi Michael,
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>I'm very pleased to make your acquaintance. I too had been
          concerned with the wane in interest in WP but that happens to
          most thinkers and I think things are now on the up. I for one
          am editing a volume for Louisiana State University Press on
          WP's philosophy and a symposium for the journal ZYGON on WP on
          religion and science. I will be on the SAMLA WP panel looking
          at WP's political philosophy. </div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>I'll drop you a line at QUC.</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>Cheers,</div>
        <div><br>
        </div>
        <div>Leslie Marsh</div>
        <div>Medical School</div>
        <div>University of British Columbia</div>
      </div>
      <div class="yiv5917098894gmail_extra"><br>
        <div class="yiv5917098894gmail_quote">On Fri, Oct 2, 2015 at 10:15 PM,
          Michael Kobre <span dir="ltr"><<a rel="nofollow" ymailto="mailto:kobrem@queens.edu" target="_blank" href="mailto:kobrem@queens.edu">kobrem@queens.edu</a>></span>
          wrote:<br>
          <blockquote class="yiv5917098894gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">
            <div lang="EN-US">
              <div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal">After a long, long delay, I’m happy
                  to join the Percy-L community.  I’m a professor and
                  Chair of the Department of English and Creative
                  Writing at Queens University of Charlotte.  More to
                  the point though, I’m the author of
                  <i>Walker Percy’s Voices</i> which was published a
                  long, long time ago (there’s that theme again) by the
                  University of Georgia Press.  In my other life as a
                  scholar, before spending the last 15 years as
                  co-director of our MFA program in creative writing, I
                  focused primarily on a Bakhtinian interpretation of
                  Percy’s work and tried to hear in his prose the sort
                  of polyphony of voices that Bakhtin discusses.  Since
                  then, when I’ve had the opportunity to write about
                  Percy, I’ve tried to examine the parallels and
                  connections between Percy and Bruce Springsteen (who’s
                  a lot louder and more famous than Bakhtin).</div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal"> </div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal">I’m working now, however, on an
                  essay that examines the changing fortunes of the
                  literary reputations of Percy and Richard Yates
                  respectively.  Yates’ signature novel
                  <i>Revolutionary Road</i> had been nominated for the
                  National Book Award alongside
                  <i>The Moviegoer</i>, and both books—at least on a
                  superficial level—occupy a similar territory,
                  following the lives of their protagonists in the new
                  suburban landscapes of America (although to very
                  different effects).  Yates felt that his loss of the
                  National Book Award dramatically altered the
                  trajectory of his career; the sales of his books were
                  at best uneven, and by the end of his life virtually
                  all of his work was out of print.  And yet, over the
                  last decade or so, Yates’ work has enjoyed a
                  significant revival.  Everything is back in print, and
                  <i>Revolutionary Road</i> is now seen as a classic
                  work of post-war American fiction and is—here’s an
                  important component of my argument—a canonical work
                  within the discipline of creative writing in
                  particular.</div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal"> </div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal">By contrast however, it seems as
                  though Percy’s work, which was far more celebrated
                  when both Percy and Yates were alive, receives less
                  attention these days.  Yes, there remains a loyal
                  audience of Percy fans (I’m reaching out to many of
                  you right now), but his work isn’t taught and
                  discussed in the same way that Yates’ work is now. 
                </div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal"> </div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal">At least that’s my perception.  And
                  this is one reason why I’m reaching out to all of
                  you.  Do you agree that Percy’s work and reputation
                  have become a little more obscure to the culture at
                  large?  If so, can you think of evidence that supports
                  this perception?  Any thoughts on this or help will be
                  much appreciated.</div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal"> </div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal">Michael Kobre, MFA, Ph.D.</div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal">Chair, Department of English and
                  Creative Writing</div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal">Queens University of Charlotte</div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal">1900 Selwyn Avenue</div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal">Charlotte, NC 28226</div>
                <div class="yiv5917098894MsoNormal"> </div>
              </div>
            </div>
            <br>
            * Percy-L Discussion Archives: <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/percy-l/">http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/percy-l/</a><br>
            <br>
            * Manage Your Membership: <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/percy-l">http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/percy-l</a><br>
            <br>
            * Contact the Moderator: percy-l-owner (at) <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://lists.ibiblio.org/">lists.ibiblio.org</a><br>
            <br>
            * Visit The Walker Percy Project: <a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy">http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy</a><br>
            <br>
          </blockquote>
        </div>
        <br>
      </div>
      <br>
      <fieldset class="yiv5917098894mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
      <br>
      <pre>* Percy-L Discussion Archives: <a rel="nofollow" class="yiv5917098894moz-txt-link-freetext" target="_blank" href="http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/percy-l/">http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/percy-l/</a>

* Manage Your Membership: <a rel="nofollow" class="yiv5917098894moz-txt-link-freetext" target="_blank" href="http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/percy-l">http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/percy-l</a>

* Contact the Moderator: percy-l-owner (at) lists.ibiblio.org

* Visit The Walker Percy Project: <a rel="nofollow" class="yiv5917098894moz-txt-link-freetext" target="_blank" href="http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy">http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy</a>
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    <pre class="yiv5917098894moz-signature">-- 
Lauren Stacy Berdy
<a rel="nofollow" class="yiv5917098894moz-txt-link-abbreviated" ymailto="mailto:Lauren.Stacy.Berdy@gmail.com" target="_blank" href="mailto:Lauren.Stacy.Berdy@gmail.com">Lauren.Stacy.Berdy@gmail.com</a>

<a rel="nofollow" class="yiv5917098894moz-txt-link-abbreviated" ymailto="mailto:AmericanGarum@gmail.com" target="_blank" href="mailto:AmericanGarum@gmail.com">AmericanGarum@gmail.com</a>
LaurenStacyBerdy.com/Garum.html
</pre>
  </div>

</div><br>* Percy-L Discussion Archives: <a href="http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/percy-l/" target="_blank">http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/percy-l/</a><br><br>* Manage Your Membership: <a href="http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/percy-l" target="_blank">http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/percy-l</a><br><br>* Contact the Moderator: percy-l-owner (at) lists.ibiblio.org<br><br>* Visit The Walker Percy Project: <a href="http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy" target="_blank">http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy</a><br><br><br></div> </div> </div>  </div></body></html>