<html>
  <head>
    <meta content="text/html; charset=ISO-8859-1"
      http-equiv="Content-Type">
  </head>
  <body bgcolor="#FFFFFF" text="#000000">
    <font face="Arial">Janet,<br>
      Thanks for sharing this video and your other many recent
      stimulating thoughts. It's been great to see a recent resurgence
      of discussion on the list, and especially rewarding to see a
      person from a younger generation as in this video becoming
      inspired by Percy. I only wish I had been "turned on" to Percy at
      such an early age.  I will be certain to post a link to the video
      on the Percy Project website in the days ahead along with it
      already being archived in the Percy-L archives.  I hope also to
      announce to the Percy-L community new ways for it to get involved
      in the Project in coming months.<br>
      <br>
      Best wishes,<br>
      Henry<br>
      <br>
      --<br>
      Henry Mills, Director & Editor<br>
      The Walker Percy Project<br>
      Percy-L Moderator<br>
      <a class="moz-txt-link-abbreviated" href="http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy">www.ibiblio.org/wpercy</a><br>
      <br>
      <br>
    </font>
    <div class="moz-cite-prefix">On 7/9/12 6:56 AM, janet cantor wrote:<br>
    </div>
    <blockquote
cite="mid:1341831369.43500.YahooMailClassic@web125902.mail.ne1.yahoo.com"
      type="cite">
      <table border="0" cellpadding="0" cellspacing="0">
        <tbody>
          <tr>
            <td style="font: inherit;" valign="top">Re: The Thanatos
              Syndrome of Walker Percy:<br>
              <br>
              <p><font size="2"><b>Eros and Thanatos</b>—Freud
                  identifies two drives that both coincide and conflict
                  within the individual and among individuals.  Eros is
                  the drive of life, love, creativity, and sexuality,
                  self-satisfaction, and species preservation. 
                  Thanatos, from the Greek word for "death" is the drive
                  of aggression, sadism, destruction, violence, and
                  death.  At the conclusion of <i>C&D,</i> Freud
                  notes (in 1930-31) that human beings, following
                  Thanatos, have invented the tools to completely
                  exterminate themselves; in turn, Eros is expected to
                  "make an effort to assert himself in the struggle with
                  an equally immortal adversary. But who can foresee
                  with what success and with what result?"</font></p>
              <p><font size="2">In <b><span class="yshortcuts"
                      id="lw_1341831250_0">Civilization and its
                      Discontents</span></b><span style="font-weight:
                    normal;">, Freud struggles with paradoxes:</span></font></p>
              <p><font size="2">1.<span style="">     </span>Human
                  behavior is motivated by a desire for happiness
                  ("satisfaction of needs").  Humans bond together to
                  promote happiness.  This bonding or "civilization"
                  works against individual happiness. </font></p>
              <p><font size="2">2.<span style="">     </span>Although
                  civilization prevents happiness, it is necessary for
                  human life.</font></p>
              <p><font size="2">3.<span style="">     </span>In order
                  for civilizations to be coherent, they channel their
                  aggression toward scapegoats (those excluded from the
                  coherence), but with little effect: "In this respect
                  the Jewish people, scattered everywhere, have rendered
                  most useful services to the civilizations of the
                  countries that have been their hosts; but
                  unfortunately all the massacres of the Jews in the
                  Middle Ages did not suffice to make that period more
                  peaceful and secure for their Christian fellows" <br>
                </font></p>
              <p><br>
              </p>
              <p><font size="2"><br>
                </font></p>
              <p><br>
              </p>
              <p><font size="2">AND this is an awkward kid who made a
                  video for his teacher as a school project to explain
                  Existentialism. Forget about his hemming and hawing
                  and just listen to him. This is the clearest
                  explanation of Existentialism I have ever heard.  Note
                  especially what he says about Kierkegard. I just love
                  this primitive video:</font></p>
              <p><br>
              </p>
              <p><a moz-do-not-send="true" rel="nofollow"
                  target="_blank"
href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bU5mozqWOEA&feature=em-share_video_user"><span
                    class="yiv1354567457yshortcuts"
                    id="yiv1354567457lw_1341830603_3">Existentialism
                    & Walker Percy.mp4</span></a></p>
            </td>
          </tr>
        </tbody>
      </table>
      <br>
      <fieldset class="mimeAttachmentHeader"></fieldset>
      <br>
      <pre wrap="">--
An archive of all list discussion is available at <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/percy-l/">http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/percy-l/</a>

Visit The Walker Percy Project at <a class="moz-txt-link-freetext" href="http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy">http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy</a>

Contact the moderator: percy-l-owner at lists.ibiblio.org (note: add @ sign when addressing email)
</pre>
    </blockquote>
    <br>
    <br>
  </body>
</html>