<html><head><style type="text/css"><!-- DIV {margin:0px;} --></style></head><body><div style="font-family:times new roman,new york,times,serif;font-size:12pt"><div><br></div><div style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 12pt;"><br><div style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 12pt;"><font face="Tahoma" size="2">----- Forwarded Message ----<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">From:</span></b> Jay Thompson <jay_thompson@rocketmail.com><br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">To:</span></b> percy-l@lists.ibiblio.org<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Sent:</span></b> Tue, February 8, 2011 12:39:27 PM<br><b><span style="font-weight: bold;">Subject:</span></b> Percy-L Digest, Vol 80, Issue 2<br></font><br>
<div style="font-family: times new roman,new york,times,serif; font-size: 12pt;">"You ask what Walker Percy is suggesting in this editorial. He is suggesting, as <br>an observer of humanity, that when someone cavalierly destroys a fetus because a <br>baby is an inconvenience, instead of thinking beforehand and behaving more <br>responsibly, that he destroys his humanity and perhaps our society." (Janet Cantor)<br><br>I appreciated the comments by both Wade Riddick and Janet Cantor, though I would suggest that Riddick's scientific Summa Biologica essentially points back to Percy's essential dilemma with science in the first place: what does science say to the matter of actually living as a human being? Or, in this case, what does it ultimately say about the ethical dilemma of abortion or the philosophical aspects related to the origins of life.<br><br>At the end of the day,
 surely a healthy respect for science, alongside the muse of the novelist/poet, and the logical arguments of the philosopher can at once be informative to our culture - a culture (as Percy would surely agree) is increasingly soul-less.<br><br>Jay Thompson<br>jay_thompson@rocketmail.com<br></div><br>

      </div></div>
</div><br>

      </body></html>