<html><div style='background-color:'><P>The thing about feeling good in bad situations seems predicated upon NOT being fatally injured, NOT losing people you love, NOT having your home crash down around you--in other words, it's that supercharged feeling that, in part, is the result of being thankful for being alive in a world newly charged with meaning because of the imminence of danger--but in Percy, Lancelot excepted, it's a danger that doesn't cause permanent damage--remember Binx in the MG with Sharon when they have the fender bender and all the malaise is swept away? Or Will and some girl in the hurricane (was it a hurricane?) when they take the child into the diner and feed him chicken soup and, in the end, everyone is okay? Sort of like the end of War of the Worlds . . .</P>
<DIV>
<P><FONT face="Lucida Handwriting, Cursive" color=#ff0099>--Rhonda</FONT></P>
<P><FONT face="Lucida Handwriting, Cursive"><FONT color=#ff0099><EM>The best lack all convictions, while the worst <BR>Are full of passionate intensity. -- </EM>WB Yeats</FONT></FONT></P></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #a0c6e5 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px"><FONT style="FONT-SIZE: 11px; FONT-FAMILY: tahoma,sans-serif">
<HR color=#a0c6e5 SIZE=1>
From: <I>dabeck@iupui.edu</I><BR>Reply-To: <I>"Percy-L: Literary and Philosophical Discussion" <percy-l@lists.ibiblio.org></I><BR>To: <I>"Percy-L: Literary and Philosophical Discussion" <percy-l@lists.ibiblio.org></I><BR>Subject: <I>[percy-l] hurricane in Lancelot</I><BR>Date: <I>Tue, 27 Sep 2005 20:21:53 -0500</I><BR>><BR>>First, I want to applaud Henry, who has taken some undeserved shots, for<BR>>trying to bring the list back to the literary/philosophical discussion for<BR>>which it is intended. When those who disagree are labeled as Nazis and<BR>>Klansmen, it's time to step in and bring some integrity (and maturity) back to<BR>>the discussion. Maybe the tree needed to be pruned. Regardless, I appreciate<BR>>his input (why can't members correspond with each other instead of the list? I<BR>>carry on off-list conversations with several members of the 
list).<BR>> But, since some want to discuss the hurricane, I thought I'd throw out this<BR>>experience. In my fiction class, I have a "displaced" student from New<BR>>Orleans, who, with her family, lost everything (she had two changes of clothes<BR>>as of last week). She came to Indianapolis a few weeks ago, several weeks into<BR>>the semester.<BR>> Anyway, today I began my lecture on Percy and, in particular, Lancelot. It<BR>>wasn't until I was into my spiel on Percy's "hurricane syndrome" that I<BR>>realized I had just (possibly) stepped into a mess. I wasn't sure if I could<BR>>convey the anticipation, the rush, the break from everydayness, without<BR>>seeming pretty shallow (in her eyes anyway). She is pretty shy, so I didn't<BR>>want to "push" her to respond, but I was interested in hearing her take on it.<BR>>But last week, when she came to my 
office to get "caught up," we talked<BR>>briefly about her situation. She said that they couldn't return, and so she<BR>>didn't know the extent of damage to her home; she did say, however, that the<BR>>area in which she lived was hit hard and not much was left standing (based on<BR>>news reports). But she started to get choked up, so I backed off.<BR>> She is way behind in class work, and I don't think she has been able to buy<BR>>the books (I'm meeting with her tomorrow to work something out). Still, I<BR>>wonder how she will see the whole hurricane effect and the hurricane in<BR>>Lancelot.<BR>> Any suggestions?<BR>>-David<BR>><BR>><BR>>--<BR>>An archive of all list discussion is available at http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/percy-l/<BR>><BR>>Visit the Walker Percy Project at http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy<BR></FONT></BLOCKQUOTE></div></html>