<DIV>
<DIV>Jim,</DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV>Peter Kramer makes some interesting observations regarding Percy's prescience _TS_ is his book _Listening to Prozac_<BR><BR>Bob Eckert</DIV>
<DIV><B><I></I></B> </DIV>
<DIV><B><I>JHForest@cs.com</I></B> wrote:</DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid"><FONT face=arial,helvetica><FONT lang=0 face="Times New Roman" size=3 FAMILY="SERIF" PTSIZE="12">Attached is a book review I did nearly 20 years ago. I share it with you as <BR>the issues Walker Percy explored in the book under review, "The Thanatos <BR>Syndrome," seem ever more current. Timely reading. Satire with the bite of <BR>Jonathan Swift.<BR><BR>Jim<BR><BR>* * *<BR><BR>The Thanatos Syndrome<BR>by Walker Percy <BR>Farrar Straus Giroux, New York<BR>1987, 372 pp<BR><BR>reviewed by Jim Forest<BR><BR>Walker Percy is southern and Catholic, Kurt Vonnegut<BR>northern and secular, not minor differences, but perhaps they<BR>recognize each other as relatives. Both are inclined to use<BR>comedy, at times the slapstick variety, in order to talk about<BR>some of the unfunniest subjects in the world, like war,<BR>euthanasia, abortion, and other justifications we cook up for<BR>killing one
 another. <BR><BR>Percy's hero in this book, as in his earlier novel, Love in the<BR>Ruins, is Dr. Thomas More, resident of a rural Louisiana<BR>parish (what we yankees call a county) and a direct<BR>descendent of St. Thomas More. Like his ancestor, he has<BR>been a prisoner, but for selling amphetamines to truckers<BR>rather than for acts of fideility to conscience. Also like his<BR>ancestor, he is a Catholic, except in the current generation,<BR>things being what they are, More's connection to his Church is<BR>threadbare. Still there is a bit of religious glue holding body<BR>and soul together. Tom More isn't able to make himself<BR>comfortable with the contemporary mercies that pave the way<BR>to the gas chamber and the abortorium.<BR><BR>In The Thanatos Syndrome we encounter a few psychiatrists<BR>who makes heaps of money running the Qualitarian Center,<BR>where the old and/or feeble-minded are provided with Death<BR>with Dignity. In their spare time, using a federal grant,
 the<BR>clever doctors are in the midst of a local experiment that they<BR>regard as the best idea since fluoride in toothpaste. While<BR>sticking to bottled water for themselves, they are lacing the<BR>water supply with a substance (borrowed from a nearby<BR>nuclear generator) that knocks out the part of the brain that<BR>makes people dangerous and miserable. Violent crime has<BR>evaporated in the area effected. Black prisoners are singing<BR>the old spirituals as they cheerfully pick cotton on the local<BR>prison farm. Sexual-transmitted diseases have practically<BR>disappeared. No more AIDS, no more herpes. <BR><BR>At first glance it looks like the doctors have found a chemical<BR>method to mass produce the lifestyle of the saints. People<BR>drinking the local water aren't inclined to do the sorts of<BR>things that make headlines in The National Enquirer. (But not<BR>quite. It turns out that adults who drink too much of the local<BR>water find that the ideal sex-partners are
 children.)<BR><BR>The part of the brain made dormant also happens to be where<BR>the soul and conscience hang out. It is the patch that has most<BR>to do with creativity, verbal skills, and what makes us who we<BR>are. Those drinking the local water are better at telling you<BR>exactly where St. Louis is than in making a sentence that<BR>includes a subject, verb and object. They are a whiz at bridge<BR>but incapable of theology.<BR><BR>Percy links what is now happening in manipulative medical<BR>technology in the US and what was going on with psychiatry<BR>in Germany from the twenties until the collapse of the Nazis,<BR>at the same time pointing out that you don't have to like Hitler<BR>(the German shrinks didn't) to end up doing some of the worst<BR>things that happened in Hitler's Germany. <BR><BR>Percy integrates a steady stream of observation about the<BR>American Way of Life and what is like living in "the Age of<BR>Not Knowing What to Do." For example here is Tom
 More<BR>reflecting about a patient who, before the local water ironed<BR>out all depression and anxiety, felt like a failure:<BR><BR>"What is failure? Failure is what people do ninety-nine<BR>percent of the time. Even in the movies: ninety-nine outtakes<BR>for one print. But in the movies they don't show the failures.<BR>What you see are the takes that work. So it looks as if every<BR>action, even going crazy, is carried off in a proper, rounded-<BR>off way. It looks as if real failure is unspeakable. TV has<BR>screwed up millions of people with their little rounded-off<BR>stories. Because that is not the way life is. Life is fits and<BR>starts, mostly fits."<BR><BR>Percy continues his assessment of contemporary American<BR>Catholicism that began in Love in the Ruins. Fr. Kev Kevin,<BR>the former director of the Love Clinic, has abandoned the<BR>controls of the Orgasmatron computer and given up the<BR>priesthood as well. He is "into Hinduism," has married a<BR>former Maryknoll nun
 who is taking up witchcraft, and<BR>together they run a marriage encounter center in a<BR>rehabilitated stable. <BR><BR>In The Thanatos Syndrome we meet a very different kind of<BR>priest: Fr. Simon Smith, a modern stylite, fasting atop a fire-<BR>watch tower as the book begins. People consider him crazy as<BR>a loon. Maybe he is, but he's a saint as well. His "confession"<BR>is the keystone of the novel. Here we discover that his<BR>vocation is an on-going penitential work having chiefly to do<BR>with the devastation his father helped bring about in Europe --<BR>he is the son of one of the liberal German physicians (anti-Nazis <BR>one and all) whose work to "relieve suffering" via<BR>euthanasia helped prepare the way for the Holocaust.<BR><BR>Father Smith's big discovery in life was that "the only people I<BR>got along with were bums, outcasts, pariahs, family skeletons,<BR>and the dying." It isn't a boast. "I don't know about Mother<BR>Theresa, but I [did what I did] because I
 liked it, not for love<BR>of the wretched ... dying people were the only people I could<BR>stand. They were my kind ... Dying people, suffering people,<BR>don't lie."<BR><BR>[October 28, 1987]<BR></FONT><FONT lang=0 style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" face="Times New Roman" color=#000000 size=2 FAMILY="SERIF" PTSIZE="10" BACK="#ffffff"><BR></FONT><FONT lang=0 style="BACKGROUND-COLOR: #ffffff" face="Times New Roman" color=#000000 size=3 FAMILY="SERIF" PTSIZE="12" BACK="#ffffff">* * *<BR>Jim & Nancy Forest<BR>Kanisstraat 5 / 1811 GJ Alkmaar / The Netherlands<BR>tel: (country code 31)(area code 72) 511 2545<BR>Jim's e-mail: jhforest@cs.com<BR>Nancy's e-mail: forestflier@cs.com<BR>Orthodox Peace Fellowship web site: http://www.incommunion.org<BR>Jim & Nancy Forest web site: http://incommunion.org/forest-flier/<BR>* * *</FONT> --<BR><BR>An archive of all list discussion is available at http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy/hypermail<BR><BR>Visit the Walker Percy Project at
 http://www.ibiblio.org/wpercy<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></FONT></DIV><p>
                <hr size=1>Celebrate Yahoo!'s 10th Birthday! <br> 
<a href="http://birthday.yahoo.com/netrospective/">Yahoo! Netrospective: 100 Moments of the Web</a>