<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2723.2500" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Thanks Karey,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Hmmm, syntax and melody  --- sequence and 
meaning.  I've never thought much about that although my violin teacher is 
doing his damnednest to get me to understand music as something more than just 
mere emoting  -- mostly frustration in my case. 
 </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>  I've long held the suspicion that syntax was 
mostly an efficient scaffold for encoding our more or less universally shared 
conceptions of time and space as the lattice in which events occured  
-- so this universal spatial-temporal scaffold of what we say is mostly 
encoded syntactically and the rest (the events themselves) semantically.  
We could do it all semantically but given the universality of our 
spatial-temporal conceptions encoding the subject-predicate template 
gramatically seems the most efficient way to go.  Of course I know next to 
nothing about what the scholars say.  </FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>The notion that an ability to easily learn, store, 
retrive and (prehaps most importantly) express sequential information is I 
suppose critical to communication.  But I also wonder to what extent 
representation can occur independent of communication.  I think the two are 
more closely connected that generally supposed.  Perhaps inextricably so. 
</FONT></DIV>
<DIV> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Best wishes,</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Jim Piat</FONT> </DIV></BODY></HTML>