<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<META content="MSHTML 6.00.2715.400" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Here are some more articles regarding perception 
and language and it's acquisition that Ken sent -- for those of you 
who are interested in the subject!</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>K</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT> </DIV>
<DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">----- Original Message ----- 
<DIV style="BACKGROUND: #e4e4e4; font-color: black"><B>From:</B> <A 
title=kdenney@mindspring.com 
href="mailto:kdenney@mindspring.com">kdenney@mindspring.com</A> </DIV>
<DIV><B>To:</B> <A title=karey@charter.net href="mailto:karey@charter.net">Karey 
L. Perkins</A> </DIV>
<DIV><B>Sent:</B> Friday, December 13, 2002 9:07 AM</DIV>
<DIV><B>Subject:</B> More pertinent articles</DIV></DIV>
<DIV><BR></DIV>Here are some more pertinent articles than the ones I have 
heretofore cited:<BR><BR><A 
href="http://www.apa.org/monitor/perception.html">http://www.apa.org/monitor/perception.html</A><BR><BR><A 
href="http://www.rochester.edu/pr/News/NewsReleases/scitech/fiser-infant.html">http://www.rochester.edu/pr/News/NewsReleases/scitech/fiser-infant.html</A><BR><BR>(Don't 
operate heavy machinery while reading this one:)<BR><A 
href="http://www.bbsonline.org/Preprints/Aboitiz/Referees/">http://www.bbsonline.org/Preprints/Aboitiz/Referees/</A><BR><BR>And 
finally:<BR> <BR>Young Baby Brain Already Primed to Learn Language<BR>Thu 
Dec 5, 5:31 PM ET .<BR>By Alison McCook <BR><BR>NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - New 
research shows that babies' brains are primed<BR>to learn language long before 
they utter or understand their first words. <BR><BR>Dr. Ghislaine 
Dehaene-Lambertz of the Center National de la Recherche<BR>Scientifique in Paris 
and her colleagues found that while 3-month-old babies<BR>are read to in their 
native language, they show brain activity in some of the<BR>regions of the adult 
brain that specialize in language. Much of that activity<BR>disappears when 
sentences are read to the babies backwards, the authors report<BR>in the 
December 6th issue of the journal Science. <BR><BR>These findings indicate that 
babies' brains are gearing up to learn and<BR>understand language at a very 
young age, Dehaene-Lambertz told Reuters Health.<BR><BR>"Babies are doing things 
very early," she said. <BR><BR>Dehaene-Lambertz and her colleagues obtained 
their findings from imaging scans<BR>of 3-month-old babies' brains as they 
listened to sentences read in their own<BR>language, and as the speech was 
pronounced backwards. Dehaene-Lambertz<BR>explained to Reuters Health that 
backward speech has many similarities to<BR>forward speech, but lacks certain 
overall cues babies likely use to determine<BR>whether the words are in their 
own language or not, such as dips at the end of<BR>sentences and other 
qualities. <BR><BR>The authors found that babies showed more activity in brain 
regions associated<BR>with speech in adults when hearing words in their own 
language than when the<BR>words were read backwards. <BR><BR>In an interview 
with Reuters Health, Dehaene-Lambertz explained that one of<BR>the baby brain 
regions active during speech is the left angular gyrus, which,<BR>in adults, is 
more active when people listen to words than to non-words. The<BR>other region 
active in baby brains is the right prefrontal region, an area<BR>that shows more 
activity in adults when they hear words that had been said to<BR>them moments 
before, but not when listening to other words. <BR><BR>A long-standing debate 
exists in the field of childhood language development,<BR>Dehaene-Lambertz 
noted. Some experts argue that babies are born already primed<BR>to process 
language, while others believe that babies are born as a blank<BR>slate, and all 
of the techniques used by the brain to understand language are<BR>learned by 
experience, she explained. <BR><BR>While the current study does not answer that 
question, Dehaene-Lambertz said<BR>that she believed no research study ever 
would--for who can state, for<BR>certain, when babies begin to have experience 
with language, when they can<BR>hear inside the womb. However, she noted that at 
3 months, baby brains are<BR>already quite specialized, indicating that if 
experience is at work, it had to<BR>work fast. <BR><BR>"If they have learned, 
they have learned very fast," she said. <BR><BR>She added that while many brain 
regions focus on language, the brain is highly<BR>adaptable; so even if babies 
experience brain damage in one of the areas<BR>normally used to process 
language, it can be overcome. "Everything is<BR>plastic," Dehaene-Lambertz 
said.. <BR></BODY></HTML>