Hello Peter,<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 8/30/06, <b class="gmail_sendername">Peter Brink</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:peter.brink@brinkdata.se">peter.brink@brinkdata.se</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
Charles Iliya Krempeaux skrev:<br>&gt;<br>&gt; As you said, not according to the law.&nbsp;&nbsp;But (to be blunt)... so what?!&nbsp;&nbsp;So<br>&gt; what if the law defines it (or redefined it) that way<br>&gt;<br>&gt; When I speak I use the definition of words (like &quot;derivative&quot; and
<br>&gt; &quot;collective work&quot;) that are in my head.&nbsp;&nbsp;This definition is usually similar<br>&gt; to the definition of my friends, colleagues, co-workers, and others I<br>&gt; associate with.&nbsp;&nbsp;I learn definitions through various means from those I do
<br>&gt; or have associated with and through materials I can learn from.<br>&gt;<br>&gt; We have things like dictionaries to help people who do not associate with<br>&gt; each other communicate with each other by keeping people's definitions of
<br>&gt; the same words similar.<br>&gt;<br>&gt; If the law said &quot;2 plus 2 makes 5&quot;, I'd still think &quot;2 plus 2 makes 4&quot;.<br>&gt;<br>&gt; To me, it seems obvious all &quot;collective works&quot; are &quot;derivatives&quot; based on
<br>&gt; how I've learnt &quot;collective works&quot; and &quot;derivatives&quot; to be defined.<br>&gt;<br>&gt; Now, having said that, when writing something like a license, I can see<br>&gt; that<br>&gt; one is compelled to use the language and definitions as given in the law.
<br>&gt;<br><br>It might be worthwhile to realise that laymen (i.e. non-lawyers) are not<br>the intended audience of the license text, lawyers are. In the end, if<br>there's a dispute over how to understand the license, legal
<br>professionals are the one's who will be called upon to arbitrate the<br>conflict. And they will read the license using the legal language they<br>have been trained to use. If there's a concept called &quot;derivative work&quot;
<br>in the license, then everyone will assume that it's the concept used in<br>copyright law that's intended.<br><br>Trying to rewrite the central concepts of copyright law would, IMO,<br>weaken the license, making it less defendable in court.
<br></blockquote></div><br>That makes sense.&nbsp; (Thanks for the explanation.)<br><br clear="all"><br><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">-- </span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Charles Iliya Krempeaux, B.Sc.</span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;charles @ <a href="http://reptile.ca">
reptile.ca</a></span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;supercanadian @ <a href="http://gmail.com">gmail.com</a></span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">
<br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;developer weblog: <a href="http://ChangeLog.ca/">http://ChangeLog.ca/</a></span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">
<span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">___________________________________________________________________________</span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">
&nbsp;Make Television&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://maketelevision.com/">http://maketelevision.com/</a></span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">