Hello Greg,<br><br>Like I already said, I really don't want to get into a philosophical or political argument on this mailing list.&nbsp; (I explained my point-of-view because I was asked about it.)<br><br>Although I would enjoy exposing your Strawman arguments, your use of Ad Hominem, your (fallacious) Appeal to Authority, etc.&nbsp; I don't think doing so here would be appropriate.&nbsp; (If you'd like to take it off list, I'd be happy to argue things.)
<br><br>My understanding was that people with different points of view and beliefs were working on the Creative Commons together.&nbsp; That such people were working together because they share some common ground.<br><br>Perhaps I was mistaken though.&nbsp; Perhaps the Creative Commons is something very different from what believed it to be.
<br><br>If that's the case then fair enough.<br><br>But the Creative Commons seems to assert that the &quot;Free Software&quot; movement was one of it's inspirations.&nbsp; So I assumed that people with such views were welcomed here, and were wanted to participate in the CC 
3.0 process.<br><br>But like I said, perhaps I am mistaken.<br><br>I'm not really sure who here to ask what the Creative Commons is really about though.&nbsp; Anyone have any suggestions?&nbsp; Can anyone explain it to me please?<br>
<br><br>See ya<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 8/29/06, <b class="gmail_sendername">Greg London</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:teloscorbin@gmail.com">teloscorbin@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
On 8/28/06, Charles Iliya Krempeaux &lt;<a href="mailto:supercanadian@gmail.com">supercanadian@gmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:<br>&gt; And, yes I know you guys have put alot of work into defining the what you<br>&gt; call a &quot;derivative work&quot; and what you call a &quot;aggregate&quot; in legalese.&nbsp;&nbsp;But
<br>&gt; it seems like a choice you guys made.<br><br>It's based on what the law says, not what we say.<br>Aggregate and collective works are legal concepts,<br>not just some choice we made.<br><br>&gt; To me, all &quot;aggregates&quot; are &quot;derivative works&quot;.
<br><br>And the law says otherwise.<br><br>&gt; The GNU LGPL puts more limits (than the<br>&gt; GNU GPL) on how copyleft can propagate through derivative works.&nbsp;&nbsp;In other<br>&gt; words, with the GNU LGPL, there are less types of &quot;derivations&quot; that would
<br>&gt; spread the copyleft (than the GNU GPL).<br><br>You have that entirely backwards.<br>GPL is more restrictive than LGPL.<br><br>LGPL will allow you to take a copyleft LIBRARY<br>and link it with proprietary libraries.
<br><br>GPL says that anything you link with must be GPL.<br>If you link your GPL library with any other code, the<br>result must be GPL'ed code.<br><br>(In both cases, this assumes you distribute the resulting code.)<br>
<br>&gt; Correct me if I'm mistaken.&nbsp;&nbsp;But I was under the impression that CC-SA does<br>&gt; NOT propagate, and thus is NOT copyleft.<br><br>Er... What?<br>The very point of ShareAlike is that it is a copyleft license<br>
that propagates. All derivatives of a CC-SA work must also<br>be CC-SA.<br><br>&gt; My interest is NOT in any &quot;gift economy&quot; experiments.<br>&gt;<br>&gt; I'm interested in liberty.<br><br>What do you think a copyleft license does other than to
<br>guarantee the liberty of the work? That's its only purpose.<br><br>&gt; I believe that the enforcement of copyright law is immoral.<br><br>Well, you're wrong. Copyright and copyleft both solve the<br>same problem in different ways. The problem is getting
<br>people to create new works.<br><br>Copyright solves the problem of encouraging individuals<br>to risk creating new works by offering them the possibility<br>of a monetary reward.<br><br>Copyleft solves the problem by allowing communities
<br>to create works together, spreading out the risk to the<br>point where individuals can make minor contributions<br>and still forward the project, and creating a work that<br>is the reward itself.<br><br>Copyright may have terms set too long and rights
<br>from the DMCA may be too powerful, but the concept<br>of copyright is quite legitmate.<br><br>You might as well be arguing that private land ownership<br>is immoral.<br><br>&gt; I see copyleft as making the world as if copyright law did NOT
<br>&gt; exist.&nbsp;&nbsp; As a way of kind of opt'ing out of copyright law.<br><br>Copyleft licenses only exist inside of copyright law.<br><br>And they both solve the same problem in different ways.<br>And depending on the project, one way often works
<br>better than the other. Not because of morality, but<br>because of the terrain of the proposed project.<br><br>&gt; I see the spreading of copyleft (in the world we live in) to be a preferred,<br>&gt; because it undoes what copyright law forces upon me and others.
<br><br>Copyright doesn't force anything on you.<br>If Disney creates a work under copyright,<br>you aren't forced to do anything with that work.<br><br>You can boycott the work if you wish.<br>But if you wish to get a copy of the work,
<br>you have to follow the law.<br><br>If you don't like that, then don't buy it.<br>If you don't like that, then make your own<br>works and give them away for free.<br><br>But no one is forcing you to buy those works<br>
or to engage in the copyright world.<br><br><br>&gt; Again, I'm NOT interested in any kind of &quot;gift economy&quot; experiment.&nbsp;&nbsp;(As I<br>&gt; explained above) I'm interested in liberty.<br><br>Right, because if I wrote a book and sold it All Rights Reserved,
<br>that would -so- impinge on your precious liberty.<br><br>&gt; The &quot;Free Software' camp is interested in liberty.&nbsp;&nbsp;From the &quot;Free Software&quot;<br>&gt; camp's point-of-view, if it all leads to better software development
<br>&gt; practices, then great... but that's besides the point.&nbsp;&nbsp;They do it all for<br>&gt; reasons of liberty.&nbsp;&nbsp;That's it.<br><br>Political motivations. Sure. You're going to put Microsoft out of business<br>because Microsoft is immoral to use copyright? You're going to put
<br>Disney out of business because Disney is immoral to use copyright?<br>Let me know when you've accomplished that goal.<br><br>Until that point, your political motivations are irrelvant from any<br>functional point of view. Your &quot;Free&quot; camp operates
<br>-exactly the same- as any other Gift Economy &quot;experiment&quot;.<br>People make individual contributions to a project under a<br>copyleft license which protects the work as it progresses.<br><br>You're not special simply because you wave a flag of &quot;liberty&quot;
<br>while you're doing it. People contribute to FLOSS projects for<br>a multitude of reasons. Your reason isn't special or any<br>better than anyone else's reason.<br><br>&gt; I want copyleft licenses that help me undo what
<br>&gt; copyright forces on me and others.<br><br>Did Disney force you to watch Mickey Mouse<br>when you were young? Did the RIAA burst into<br>your house and force you to buy their records?<br><br>Unless anyone actually forced you to pay for
<br>copyright works, then you're simply using<br>highly charged emotional language in spite<br>of reality.<br><br><br>&gt; Also, I believe that one can still (have a working<br>&gt; business model and) make a living in such a
<br>&gt; situation.&nbsp;&nbsp;(The &quot;Free Software&quot; world already has many<br>&gt; success stories.)<br><br>so, you're pursuit of liberty is achieved when you<br>can make&nbsp;&nbsp;money.<br><br>&gt; I think we just need a Creative Commons Copyleft license with a bit stronger
<br>&gt; terms for propagating the copyleft.&nbsp;&nbsp;(A model similar to the duo of the GNU<br>&gt; GPL and the GNU LGPL seems good.)<br><br>Except neither GPL nor LGPL says the license must propagate<br>to collective works. Tell you what, you talk to the
<br>folks at GNU. They're real big on liberty. And you tell<br>them they need to change teh GPL so that it propagates<br>through collective works. When they agree to that,<br>lemme know, and we can talk some more.<br></blockquote>
</div><br><br clear="all"><br><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">-- </span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Charles Iliya Krempeaux, B.Sc
.</span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;charles @ <a href="http://reptile.ca">reptile.ca</a></span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">
<span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;supercanadian @ <a href="http://gmail.com">gmail.com</a></span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;developer weblog: <a href="http://ChangeLog.ca/">http://ChangeLog.ca/</a></span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">___________________________________________________________________________
</span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;Make Television&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;<a href="http://maketelevision.com/">http://maketelevision.com/</a></span>
<br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">