Hello Greg,<br><br><div><span class="gmail_quote">On 8/28/06, <b class="gmail_sendername">Greg London</b> &lt;<a href="mailto:email@greglondon.com">email@greglondon.com</a>&gt; wrote:</span><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
&gt; if an image or video is made copylefted by<br>&gt; licensing it under the Creative Commons BY-SA<br>&gt; license, then if a webpage were to embed such<br>&gt; an image or video, then would it (the web page)<br>&gt; become copylefted too?
<br><br>As others have said: no. Because the webpage would<br>be a collective work, not a derived work.<br><br>&gt; To be honest I'd prefer if both situations existed.<br>&gt; I.e., if there was a Creative Commons license that
<br>&gt; was like the GNU GPL and if there were a Creative<br>&gt; Commons license like the GNU LGPL, with respect to<br>&gt; embedding.<br><br>Embedding is really aggregating. and aggregating<br>is nothing more than putting what could be completely
<br>unrelated works next to each other.</blockquote><div><br><br>Feel free to correct me if you see a problem with my reasoning. but....<br><br>This distinction you guys make between &quot;derivative works&quot; and &quot;aggregates&quot; seems quite subjective.
<br><br>And, yes I know you guys have put alot of work into defining the what you call a &quot;derivative work&quot; and what you call a &quot;aggregate&quot; in legalese.&nbsp; But it seems like a choice you guys made.<br><br>
To me, all &quot;aggregates&quot; are &quot;derivative works&quot;.<br><br>Just a note though... a copyleft license puts limits on what kinds of &quot;derivations&quot; will cause the copyleft to proagate.&nbsp; For example, the GNU LGPL has more limits than the GNU GPL.
<br><br>But I'm arguing semantics.&nbsp; And getting away from the my point....<br><br></div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
The LibraryGPL is based on derivative works,<br>saying that basically, the work is copyleft,<br>but you can link to it with proprietary works.<br>Linking is creating a derivative work, not<br>an aggregate or collective work.
</blockquote><div><br>I'm not sure I'd agree with that.&nbsp; The GNU LGPL puts more limits (than the GNU GPL) on how copyleft can propagate through derivative works.&nbsp; In other words, with the GNU LGPL, there are less types of &quot;derivations&quot; that would spread the copyleft (than the GNU GPL).
<br><br>&nbsp;</div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">Using LGPL/GPL as a model, except applying it to<br>aggragates, Creative Commons Share Alike,
<br>CC-SA is like a CollectiveGPL, meaning the work<br>is treated as copyleft, as are derivatives of the<br>work, but you can aggregate it with proprietary works.</blockquote><div><br>Correct me if I'm mistaken.&nbsp; But I was under the impression that CC-SA does NOT propagate, and thus is NOT copyleft.
<br><br>The ability for the copyleft (or whatever) to propagate is extremely important.<br>&nbsp;</div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">
If you say you can't even aggregate a copyleft work<br>with anything else, then very strange things happen,<br>not the least of which would mean that you couldn't<br>distribute linux on a CD with anything other than<br>GPL'ed code, you might need separate websites simply
<br>to distribute GPL'ed works and non-GPLed works.<br><br>If you want to get really extreme, one could always<br>attempt to lobby for a copyleft license that requires<br>that the work can only be -distributed- with copylefted
<br>works, meaning you'd have to do some creative routing<br>just to get the work from the server, through networks<br>using only copylefted code, to your desktop.<br><br>None of these restrictions would help the gift economy
<br>project. And not having these restrictions do not expose<br>the gift economy project to unfair competition from<br>proprietary sources.</blockquote><div><br>My interest is NOT in any &quot;gift economy&quot; experiments.
<br><br>I'm interested in <span style="font-weight: bold;">liberty</span>.&nbsp; I believe that the enforcement of copyright law
is immoral.&nbsp; I see copyleft as making the world as if copyright
law did NOT exist.&nbsp;&nbsp;
As a way of kind of opt'ing out of copyright law.<br><br>I see the spreading of copyleft (in the world we live in) to
be a preferred, because it undoes what copyright law forces upon me and
others.<br><br>(NOTE: I am NOT trying to get into a political or
philosophical argument.&nbsp; Just trying to explain my point-of-view.)
<br><br><br>&nbsp;</div><br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="border-left: 1px solid rgb(204, 204, 204); margin: 0pt 0pt 0pt 0.8ex; padding-left: 1ex;">&gt; For my particular usage, I could see a business model<br>&gt; (a way of making a living) established on copylefting
<br>&gt; works under a Creative Commons license like the GNU GPL,<br>&gt; ... where one would take advantage of other's reluctance<br>&gt; to license their own works under the same license.<br><br>That might be an advantage for you, but such a license
<br>would be harmful to the gift economy that created the<br>work in the first place.</blockquote><div><br>Again, I'm NOT interested in any kind of &quot;gift economy&quot; experiment.&nbsp; (As I explained above) I'm interested in liberty.
<br><br>If you think of it from the FOSS -- Free and Open Source Software -- point-of-view.&nbsp; With that, there are 2 camps.&nbsp; The &quot;Free Software&quot; camp.&nbsp; And the &quot;Open Source Software&quot; camp.&nbsp; (They often work together, but they are NOT the same.)
<br><br>While the &quot;Open Source Software&quot; camp might be motivated in social engineering experiments.&nbsp; Saying that the Open Source methodology leads to the development of better software....<br><br>The &quot;Free Software' camp is interested in liberty.&nbsp; From the &quot;Free Software&quot; camp's point-of-view, if it all leads to better software development practices, then great... but that's besides the point.&nbsp; They do it all for reasons of liberty.&nbsp; That's it.
<br>&nbsp;</div>I'm coming at the Creative Commons from the point-of-view of liberty (just like the &quot;Free Software&quot; camp).<br><br>I want copyleft licenses that help me undo what copyright forces on me and others.<br>
<br><br>Also, I believe that one can still (have a working business model and) make a living in such a situation.&nbsp; (The &quot;Free Software&quot; world already has many success stories.)<br><br>I think we just need a Creative Commons Copyleft license with a bit stronger terms for propagating the copyleft.&nbsp; (A model similar to the duo of the GNU GPL and the GNU LGPL seems good.)
<br><br></div><br>See ya<br clear="all"><br><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">-- </span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;Charles Iliya Krempeaux, 
B.Sc.</span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;charles @ <a href="http://reptile.ca">reptile.ca</a></span>
<br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;supercanadian @ <a href="http://gmail.com">gmail.com</a></span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">
<span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;developer weblog: <a href="http://ChangeLog.ca/">http://ChangeLog.ca/</a></span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">
___________________________________________________________________________</span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><span style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">&nbsp;Make Television&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp;
<a href="http://maketelevision.com/">http://maketelevision.com/</a></span><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;"><br style="font-family: courier new,monospace;">