<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 TRANSITIONAL//EN">
<HTML>
<HEAD>
  <META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; CHARSET=UTF-8">
  <META NAME="GENERATOR" CONTENT="GtkHTML/3.10.3">
</HEAD>
<BODY>
On Fri, 2006-11-08 at 19:04 -0500, Terry Hancock wrote:
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>
<PRE>
<FONT COLOR="#000000">Of course, this is somewhat moot. Why are they using a CC license for</FONT>
<FONT COLOR="#000000">software?  Use the GPL instead, it's much more clear cut on this issue.</FONT>
</PRE>
</BLOCKQUOTE>
The example this started with actually had a game that included by-2.0-licensed media, but that detail seems to have gotten lost.<BR>
<BR>
There are already game projects that are using CC licenses for level designs, interstitial video, graphics, and audio, although the game engine itself uses the GPL or something similarly program-oriented.
<BLOCKQUOTE TYPE=CITE>
<PRE>
<FONT COLOR="#000000">&gt;  You can play stuff on your DRM hardware, but you cannot be allowed to</FONT>
<FONT COLOR="#000000">&gt;  use that DRM barrier as a way to circumvent the requirement that you</FONT>
<FONT COLOR="#000000">&gt;  share your derivatives with the original project.</FONT>

<FONT COLOR="#000000">I for one agree that should be the goal.</FONT>
</PRE>
</BLOCKQUOTE>
I agree too (although I think the needs of other recipients, besides the original project, are important too). I also think parallel distribution meets this goal.<BR>
<BR>
~Evan<BR>
<BR>
</BODY>
</HTML>