[permaculture] Fwd: Breeding plants in diverse communities may lead to more productive plants

Lawrence London lfljvenaura at gmail.com
Thu Nov 13 21:01:44 EST 2014


---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Lawrence London <lfljvenaura at gmail.com>
Date: Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 8:55 PM
Subject: Re: [permaculture] Breeding plants in diverse communities may lead
to more productive plants
To: Alia Tsang <alia at dietrick.org>




On Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 8:01 PM, Alia Tsang <alia at dietrick.org> wrote:

> That's really interesting about the clover, I'll have to read more
> about it. The fungus I'm looking at doing my masters work with is an
> endophyte that might by mycorrhiza-like, but the interesting thing is
> it's also saprotrophic so it can be more easily cultured than most
> mycorrhizae (because you need a host to grow mycorrhizae). It has the
> potential to be more useful as a crop inoculant than mycorrhizae, but
> there questions about what conditions it'd be helpful. (Mycorrhizae
> kind of act like parasites if you have a super fertilized conventional
> crop because the plant doesn't need any help.) The lab I'm in is more
> ecology focused, trying to figure out its role in its natural
> ecosystem, but you need to have an idea of that to know to apply it to
> agriculture.
>
> It's actually not hard to convince a lab to let you give them free
> labor.... :)
>

That is cool! its the way things should be. The other fungal crop
innoculant sounds very interesting.
Has there ever been any research on it in boosting field crop or forestry
production and also enhance regenerative capabilities of plants
in their given ecological niche?

Do an experiment with your fungus in an intercropped raised bed (with
minimal supplemental nutrient amendments), with soil OM content favorable
for
colonization of your fungus, planted with red clover and some target crop
plant that would benefit from the mycorrhizal fungi (oak or pine seedlings
or something else).
Do one bed with your fungus and one without then measure vitality and size
(and root mass) of the target plants.
Do a two more test plots with/without your fungus where the soil has been
heavily amended with a variety of rock powders (some from quarries,
azomite, aragonite for non calciphobes, greensand and rock and colloidal
phosphate.
You should get a variety of useful results from this not the least of which
is the value of soil remineralization.

LL


>
> a
>
> On Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 11:51 PM, Lawrence London <lfljvenaura at gmail.com>
> wrote:
> >
> >
> > On Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 4:06 PM, Alia Tsang <alia at dietrick.org> wrote:
> >>
> >> Not officially in school, just hanging around a lab until I can start
> >
> >
> > That would be a dream situation for many people; you are fortunate.
> >
> >>
> >> a masters. I'm planning on doing research with symbiotic fungi like
> >> mycorrhizae (and all their friends), looking at how they affect the
> >> community and how environment affects the symbiosis.
> >>
> > Fantastic! That should be a lifetime of work though I am sure that
> research
> > should lead to other fields of study that you might want to pursue.
> > In my information collection on and off line I have references to red
> > clover, when planted in an area already colonized by various fungi,
> produces
> > a substance that
> > stimulates mycorrhizal fungi to mine even more minerals to make available
> > for uptake by plants. Some researchers thought about the idea of
> building a
> > system that would produce this substance in marketable quantities. I
> have a
> > small collection of discussion forum posts, mostly sanet-mg, about this.
> >
> > ARS : Brendan A Niemira
> >
> > www.ars.usda.gov/pandp/.../people.htm?...
> > Agricultural Research Service
> > Brendan A Niemira | | brendan.niemira at ars.usda.gov | Research Leader.
> >
> > This person posted the first reference to this phenomenon and I think it
> was
> > in some Usenet newsgroup or possibly sanet. I have posted the whole
> thread
> > to this list at least once. Have you heard about this?
> >
> > LL
> >
> >>
> >> On Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 7:52 PM, Lawrence London <lfljvenaura at gmail.com
> >
> >> wrote:
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > On Thu, Nov 13, 2014 at 2:42 PM, Alia Tsang <alia at dietrick.org>
> wrote:
> >> >>
> >> >> Thanks. :)
> >> >
> >> >
> >> > Are you in school, Alia? Graduate? What field are you studying?
> >> >
> >> > LL
> >> >
> >> > --
> >> > Lawrence F. London
> >> > lfljvenaura at gmail.com
> >> > http://www.avantgeared.com
> >> > https://plus.google.com/+Avantgeared
> >> > Ello: https://ello.co/ecoponderosa
> >> > Twitter: @ecoponderosa
> >> > Reddit: ecoponderosa
> >> > Cellphone: lfljcell at gmail.com
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > Lawrence F. London
> > lfljvenaura at gmail.com
> > http://www.avantgeared.com
> > https://plus.google.com/+Avantgeared
> > Ello: https://ello.co/ecoponderosa
> > Twitter: @ecoponderosa
> > Reddit: ecoponderosa
> > Cellphone: lfljcell at gmail.com
>



-- 
Lawrence F. London
lfljvenaura at gmail.com
http://www.avantgeared.com
https://plus.google.com/+Avantgeared
Ello: https://ello.co/ecoponderosa <https://ello.co/ecoponderosa>
Twitter: @ecoponderosa <https://twitter.com/ecoponderosa>
Reddit: ecoponderosa
Cellphone: lfljcell at gmail.com



-- 
Lawrence F. London
lfljvenaura at gmail.com
http://www.avantgeared.com
https://plus.google.com/+Avantgeared
Ello: https://ello.co/ecoponderosa <https://ello.co/ecoponderosa>
Twitter: @ecoponderosa <https://twitter.com/ecoponderosa>
Reddit: ecoponderosa
Cellphone: lfljcell at gmail.com


More information about the permaculture mailing list