[permaculture] DGR/permaculture response

Lawrence London lfljvenaura at gmail.com
Fri Jul 5 18:33:30 EDT 2013


On Fri, Jul 5, 2013 at 5:40 PM,  <kelda at riseup.net> wrote:
> To those following the DGR/Permaculture thread:
> Thanks for the conversation! To be able to answer immediately is beyond
> the scope of my time priorities :)
>
> To Lawrence: Thanks for the offer for online support for regional food
> network. I think my main work right now is not being online though, but
> getting more robust gardens going in my neighborhood that can supply local
> stores. That just means skilling up the many who are already showing
> interest in person!


Well, that's the most important thing, hands on gardening and
permaculture systems building.
The NPSPMDN can come later if and when you want to build a network of
gardeners and customers
or go for:
LocallyGrown.net — LocallyGrown.net
www.locallygrown.net/‎
Locally grown food from local growers! LocallyGrown.net takes the best
things about traditional farmers markets, CSAs, and buying clubs and
wraps them all ...
You visited this page on 6/30/13.
or your local version of:
Homegrown Co-op — LocallyGrown.net - Orlando
homegrowncoop.org/‎

> But about Cuba: I echo Bob in asking not to idealize the country or demand
> our uncritical support! I've been there twice and do love it, and hope to

I will continue to idealize Cuba and demand that we support this fine country.

> go this fall for the convergence, and yes they've done amazing things with
> the food system. But they have no freedom of speech!  The permaculture

I find that hard to believe even though you say you've been there and
see it. I will have to check this out.
>>>
just checked it out with a friend in a telco conversation:

> folks I've met there have been afraid to talk with me for too long --let

The Cuban government is suspicious of foreigners, some of whom might get
Cuban people involved in projects that could lead to exploitation by
foreign businesses or governments.
It is as simple as that. The US does not have a great track record
dealing with Cuba and the Cuban Government is erring on the side of
caution.
It is not a matter of a repressive dictatorship striving to remain in
power and exert total control over its citizens and their activities
(this can be taken two ways but you probably get what I am driving
at). Your statement sounds like you are sounding the alarm about there
being no freedom in Cuba and
are throwing the baby out with the bathwater. I think you would be in
error there. After all IPC11 is being held there. This would never
happen in a dictatorship.
Again, not to worry, strive for progress. Onward relentless. There is
hope as I see it. I speak for myself having awoken from a cloud of
gloom and doom to see the reality of Cuba and its potential,
which is enormous. I will not back off support for the Cuban people.
So, no matter. Not to worry. Forge ahead. If you don't then they will
end up back the way they were before
the revolution. Walk the tightrope and strive for progress even though
there may be unreasonable government surveillance (sound familiar?)
from the existing political regime.

I date from the Sixties when one of humanity's most robust, creative
and positive cultural renaissances began with repercussions echoing
through the following hundred years. I remember listening to salsa on
Cuban AM radio stations on my crystal set, later shortwave and
broadcast AM. Where is that now?

Anyway, Kelda, learn more about Cuba and get feedback from other
individuals and groups that have visited there. The "lack of freedom"
is simply government caution and prevention of a return to foreign
exploitation or worse, invasion and conquest. Think about it, makes
sense. Walk before running.

Is the Catholic Church in Cuba? the Episcopal Church? Methodist?
Presbyterian? How nice it would be to establish Anglican, Zen or
Tibetan monasteries in Cuba. That would be a sign or real progress.

> alone host me overnight-- should their neighbors rat them out to the
> government (who would fine them for associating with foreigners without a
> permit). It is NOT an ideal country. Elements of it yes, but think about
> the total impact of a dictatorship without freedom of speech, even if
> heavily communal and self-reliant.

So, no matter. Not to worry. Forge ahead. If you don't then they will
end up the way they were before
the revolution. Walk the tightrope and strive for progress even though
there may be unreasonable government surveillance (sound familiar?)
from the existing political regime.


More information about the permaculture mailing list