[permaculture] Drylands water capture question

Jay Woods woodsjay at cox.net
Sat Apr 27 07:29:58 EDT 2013


Learning what I did was hard on the plants. I burned through 500 pine trees and 30 or 
so fruit trees before "getting it right". The family insisted on calling it the "Annual Kill A 
Grape Vine Day" for the 13 years that I planted the grapes on that ridge. 

A fun thing to plant in the basin around the trees is iris (where the rocks are thin). 
They are still growing even though I've been gone for 20 years.

On Friday, April 26, 2013 09:34:47 PM Koreen Brennan wrote:
> LOL. Sounds pretty entertaining. :-) Need any help? I know a couple of guys
> who would get a kick out of that. Do you use any irrigation on the apricot
> or plum at all? Just the rocks?  We don't have rocks there - it's really
> just clay and dust. But we can use a snow fence. 
> 
> These are all great stories! Glad I asked, just to hear the stories :-)  And
> great info too. I'm all ears - love it!  
>  
> 
> 
> ________________________________
>  From: Jay Woods <woodsjay at cox.net>
> To: permaculture <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Sent: Friday, April 26, 2013 8:14 AM
> Subject: Re: [permaculture] Drylands water capture question
> 
> 
> In Yakima up on the ridges at 3000 ft, I've done well with Manchurian
> apricot and plums.
> 
> To harvest water I used the tricks of ditching to a basin around the tree
> with a 6 in layer of rocks over the basin and a larger pile of rocks on the
> Northwest side of the tree (which is the usual direction of blowing snow)
> to stop snow drifting and harvest the water. Of course, drilling a 4 ft
> hole and 1/4 stick of dynamite to break up the caliche layer is a fun
> activity.
> 
> On Thursday, April 25, 2013 09:43:38 PM Andrew Millison wrote:
> > Koreen,
> > I noticed on the Navajo and Hopi lands, very harsh high desert with
> > extreme
> > wind, the only deciduous tree that grew in extremely degraded areas is the
> > Siberian Elm. I'd stare in wonder as I passed by abandoned rest stops or
> > burnt out homes at how the ugly elm with it's dead lower limbs and
> > sandblasted understory persisted.
> > 
> > There are not a lot of fans of this tree out there, but I have recommended
> > planting it on the windswept Colorado Plateau because of it's usefulness
> > as
> > firewood and coppice abilities. Many people drive up in the hills to cut
> > Juniper, when they could have multiple windbreaks of Ulmus pumila cut on
> > multi-year rotation for fuel near their homes. It's not an exceptional
> > firewood, but it's decent, I've burned it plenty. You can plant from the
> > prolific seed, just rake them into a swale and they will germinate with
> > abundance. Of course the seed will blow into gardens and act as a weed in
> > cultivated areas. But windbreaks of Siberian Elm spaced out every 50 feet
> > will alter the microclimate to get more valuable trees established.
> > 
> > Good luck!
> > Andrew
> > 
> > On Thu, Apr 25, 2013 at 9:00 PM, loren luyendyk <loren at sborganics.com>wrote:
> > > Hi Koreen-
> > > 
> > > You could try to catch some atmospheric moisture to water the trees.  A
> > > shade cloth shelter on the upwind side will block the wind, offer some
> > > shade, and also act as a dew fence- if there is any moisture in the wind
> > > when it blows it will condense on the fabric and drip to wherever you
> > > direct it.  You can get big rolls of shade cloth for pretty cheap, and
> > > can
> > > use rebar to stake- 3 x 4 ft pieces/ tree.  Alternatively if you can get
> > > ahold of bamboo that may suffice and be cheaper, but may not hold up in
> > > big
> > > winds.
> > > 
> > > If you have rocks available they are great mulch.  Stacks of them will
> > > also condense atmospheric moisture.  There was a thread on them
> > > recently-
> > > air wells. really labor intensive obviously but permanent.
> > > 
> > > The "waterboxx" is another gadget to catch dew, but their $30/ea price
> > > tag
> > > is a little expensive.  They have an agenda to replant 2 billion
> > > hectares
> > > with their planting technique.  Maybe  they would donate 600 units!?
> > > http://www.groasis.com/en/summary/summary-of-the-groasis-technology
> > > 
> > > The idea is surface area catches water, especially if there is a
> > > temperature gradient like when dew condenses on metal at night because
> > > the
> > > metal is colder than the air.  You could accomplish this on the cheap
> > > with
> > > corrugated roofing or metal sheeting shaped into funnels around the
> > > bases
> > > of trees to direct dew to the roots.
> > > 
> > > Not sure how realistic any of these would be on the rez.  Of course all
> > > this also depends on their being moisture in the air.  Maybe try it out
> > > on
> > > a few and see how it goes.
> > > 
> > > cheers-
> > > Loren Luyendyk
> > > 805-452-8249
> > > Permaculture Design and Education
> > > ISA Certified Arborist #WE-7805A
> > > www.sborganics.com
> > > www.globalpermaculture.com
> > > www.surferswithoutborders.com
> > > 
> > > > Date: Thu, 25 Apr 2013 09:09:32 -0700
> > > > From: cory8570 at yahoo.com
> > > > To: permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> > > > Subject: Re: [permaculture] Drylands water capture question
> > > > 
> > > > You have a mustang!  Amazing creatures aren't they?  Thank you much
> > > > for
> > > 
> > > sharing your favorite alnifolias. I think we did actually get a Regent
> > > last
> > > year so now I'll take a good look when I go up. You're growing passion
> > > flower as an annual? I tried to get seed started up there one year but
> > > was
> > > doing too much else to pay attention, it didn't take off. Does it fruit
> > > in
> > > the season you have, or do you extend with greenhouse?  Yum!
> > > 
> > > > Koreen Brennan
> > > > 
> > > > www.growpermaculture.com
> > > > www.facebook.com/growpermaculturenow
> > > > www.meetup.com/sustainable-urban-agriculture-coalition
> > > > 
> > > > 
> > > > ________________________________
> > > >


More information about the permaculture mailing list