[permaculture] Two models for implementing change - what do you think?

S P SHERMAN spsherm at msn.com
Fri Mar 23 17:06:25 EDT 2012


Yes, and perhaps a no.  
 
I do not see the lists as mutually exclusive (although they certainly are at any single point in time for any single individual). Rather I see them as describing the reactions of different people at different stages of the awareness of a problem.
 
Societies are made up of many people, with widely different interests and awareness about problems, the present, and the future. It is futile (IMO) to expect everyone to have the same level of interest in any problem, until perhaps it reaches a crisis stage. (BTW I am not saying this is good, just from my observations the way it is). Therefore I expect that there will be some people who will notice and latch onto an issue/problem very early on. Long before it has even come into the awareness of the vast majority. When that problem is seen as a critical one, it can lead to much fustration for those who are aware of the problem, and are trying to explain and convince others about its urgency. It's very difficult to convince a person who can't even see the shadow of a problem that it requires fixing. 
 
>From this perspective, I think both those lists (as well as a few more) are operative in a society at any given point in time. At the beginning, only the few who are aware of the looming problem will be working somewhere in the second list; the majority will be unaware of the problem and still in denial on the first list (if even that far). As the problem begins to show itself more and more, people will change their stances. Some will start moving through the K-R stages of acceptance. Others will be moving through the steps of the second list, or other lists which get constructed as alternative solutions to the perceived problem.
 
So, I guess what I am trying to say is that these two lists represent two of the many possible different stages of awareness and action about a problem. The question isn't so much which is the better list, but rather what is the most viable means of increasing awareness of the problem, and moving people from one set of reactions (list) to another before the problem reaches a crisis stage. Which "list" you are "on" is more a measure of your awareness of the problem than anything else.
 
A useful question may be what is the appropriate amount of time and energy for those who are aware of the problem early, to put into the various steps/stages of the solution and when. Clearly one cannot wait until the problem is in full bloom to start taking action. But also, it can be a drain of time and energy (as well as quite fustrating) to crusade for problem which is too far out of the awareness of the majority to gain traction. Like many things which deal with society at large, I expect that this will require a multi-pronged approach; rather than "putting all of our eggs into one basket."   
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
 

> From: toby at patternliteracy.com
> Date: Fri, 23 Mar 2012 08:38:40 -0700
> To: permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> Subject: Re: [permaculture] Two models for implementing change - what do you think?
> 
> The two lists are talking about very different phenomena, as Liane points out, and so they can't be compared--apples and oranges. The first is a description, based on case studies, of how people respond to trauma. Only the second list is a manual for implementing change. One is pull (dealing with an outcome), the other is push (creating an outcome). Critical thinking, please!
> 
> The useful piece for me is that a designer could use the first list to create a pattern-literate process for helping implement change. We know that people respond to unwelcome facts or requests initially with denial, so how does a change maker work with that and design a process that honors the denial phase, rather than trying to overwhelm it, and help people move rapidly to acceptance? And so on.
> 
> I don't like the "create urgency" tactic, personally. It smacks of Fox News-style manipulation, and the whole list gives me the sense it was designed as a way for people who feel disempowered to get their agenda past other people who feel disempowered (which is the case in most corporate culture). If change is truly warranted, all you should need to do is alert people properly to the situation and it will create its own sense of urgency. An ethical change-maker only creates change where it's needed, not just because they want to shove people in a particular direction.
> 
> Toby 
> http://patternliteracy.com
> 
> 
> On Mar 22, 2012, at 6:17 PM, Cory Brennan wrote:
> 
> > I hear you. I still don't think it should end at acceptance. Getting on with one's life and back into creation of it is very important, once one has accepted that someone is gone. I agree that it's an appropriate model for Transition, as we move from the death of a culture many of us have grown very comfortable with (in this country, not permaculturists), to the birth of something that is hopefully far better, but scary and unknown to many people. 
> > 
> > 
> > ________________________________
> > From: Liane Salgado <gamberster at gmail.com>
> > To: permaculture <permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org> 
> > Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2012 3:43 PM
> > Subject: Re: [permaculture] Two models for implementing change - what do you think?
> > 
> > The first model was created as a way of dealing with death and dying, so it
> > ends with acceptance. I do think in the case of Transition, the first model
> > describes the stages of just accepting reality! Then, we try to create
> > change that will affect that reality.
> > 
> > On Thu, Mar 22, 2012 at 3:04 PM, Cory Brennan <cory8570 at yahoo.com> wrote:
> > 
> >> The first model shouldn't stop at acceptance - that is only the beginning
> >> of the journey. But maybe you mean it to lead into the second model? I'm
> >> not sure if the order is correct in that one; would have to test it or
> >> think about examples more - how it might be like that, or not be like that.
> >> I see it as a cyclical movement, not linear, in any case. And since
> >> corporate culture is not sustainable, I would remove the word corporate.
> >> Not excluding it, but just not limiting to that. We need to create change
> >> across the boards.
> >> 
> >> 
> >> ________________________________
> >> From: Carl DuPoldt <cdupoldt at yahoo.com>
> >> To: permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> >> Sent: Thursday, March 22, 2012 2:52 PM
> >> Subject: [permaculture] Two models for implementing change - what do you
> >> think?
> >> 
> >> 
> >> Two models for implementing change:
> >> http://www.change-management-coach.com/kubler-ross.html
> >> five stages include
> >> denial
> >> anger
> >> bargaining
> >> depression
> >> acceptance
> >> --------------------------
> >> http://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newPPM_82.htm
> >> eight stages include
> >> create urgency
> >> form a powerful coalition
> >> create a vision
> >> communicate the vision
> >> remove obstacles
> >> create short-term wins
> >> build on the change
> >> anchor the change in the corporate culture
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> permaculture mailing list
> >> permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> >> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> >> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> >> message archives: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/
> >> Google message archive search:
> >> site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [searchstring]
> >> Avant Geared http://www.avantgeared.com
> >> _______________________________________________
> >> permaculture mailing list
> >> permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> >> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> >> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> >> message archives: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/
> >> Google message archive search:
> >> site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [searchstring]
> >> Avant Geared http://www.avantgeared.com
> >> 
> > 
> > 
> > 
> > -- 
> > "Days are long, years are short."
> > Gretchen Rubin
> > 
> > Liane Salgado
> > Energy Modeling
> > GIS and Technical Writing
> > Permaculture Design
> > Chapel Hill, NC
> > 
> > http://www.designbuilderusa.com/
> > 
> > www.transitioncch.org
> > _______________________________________________
> > permaculture mailing list
> > permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> > subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> > http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> > message archives: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/
> > Google message archive search:
> > site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [searchstring]
> > Avant Geared http://www.avantgeared.com
> > _______________________________________________
> > permaculture mailing list
> > permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> > subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> > http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> > message archives: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/
> > Google message archive search:
> > site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [searchstring]
> > Avant Geared http://www.avantgeared.com
> 
> _______________________________________________
> permaculture mailing list
> permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
> message archives: http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture/
> Google message archive search:
> site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/permaculture [searchstring]
> Avant Geared http://www.avantgeared.com
 		 	   		  


More information about the permaculture mailing list