[permaculture] BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Global warming: Crisis for Earth?

Niels Corfield mudguard at gmail.com
Tue Jul 4 14:45:41 EDT 2006


God!

How you can reprint anything from this geezer?

I thought we would be spared him, after this, and hopefully his last 
time around the book circuit?

But no!
People actually listen to this crazed old fool!

/The Revenge of Gaia/! Why not just call it /Gaia 2 -the Sequel/ /(this 
time it's for real!) or Gaia's II -She's Back! And She's Pissed!/

And he reckons we're all fucked already, so what is there to talk about?
You either believe him, hmm, and just give-up or top yourself (helpful 
to humanity as this will be Lovelock-followers)
Or you ignore the rantings of atomic energy-book-peddling fool and just 
get on with it, like we have been anyway.

Sorry Lawrence.

ATB,
N*

Lawrence F. London, Jr. wrote:

><http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/sci/tech/5141142.stm>
>Last Updated: Monday, 3 July 2006, 15:31 GMT 16:31 UK
>Global warming: Crisis for Earth?
>By Richard Black
>Environment correspondent, BBC News website
>
>Professor James Lovelock. Image: Sandy Lovelock
>James Lovelock: The Revenge of Gaia is "a wake-up call"
>The BBC is to gather expert evidence this week on whether human-induced climate change is a crisis for planet Earth, as 
>James Lovelock believes.
>
>The originator of the Gaia concept wrote in his recent book "...the fever of global heating is real and deadly".
>
>He says nuclear power is the only short-term way to provide enough energy without causing more climatic harm.
>
>The BBC has commissioned a panel of scientists to review Professor Lovelock's evidence and opinions.
>
>Panel members include top British experts on the Antarctic, climate modelling, interactions between oceans and 
>atmosphere, and sustainable development.
>
>It will meet on Monday and Tuesday, with conclusions and comments reported on Thursday on Radio 4's Today programme and 
>on the BBC News website.
>
>Goddess on the edge
>
>	
>We may truly be in grave danger... few of the present inhabitants of the earth are likely to survive beyond the 21st Century
>James Lovelock
>The Revenge of Gaia, published earlier this year, is the latest in a series of books in which James Lovelock has 
>developed the Gaia theory, which takes its name from the goddess of the Earth, or the Earth Mother, in Greek mythology.
>
>The key idea is that the segment of Earth from the bottom of its crust to the top of its atmosphere acts as a 
>self-regulating being, keeping conditions suitable for life.
>
>A subtitle for Gaia theory is "the science of planetary medicine"; and in The Revenge of Gaia, James Lovelock argues 
>that the planetary patient is seriously unwell.
>
>"In January 2004, Sandy [his wife] and I were invited to the Hadley Centre in Exeter [part of the UK Met Office], and 
>that visit made us both aware of the deadly seriousness of the Earth's condition," Professor Lovelock told the BBC News 
>website.
>
>"We discussed the rapid melting of ice floating on the Arctic Ocean, and the way that Greenland's glaciers are 
>vanishing. We talked about global heating in the tropics and the threat to the forests there, and about the response of 
>the great boreal forests of Siberia and Canada to climate change.
>
>	
>
>Lost bond with animate Earth
>Too crowded for Utopia
>"It was a deeply gloomy picture; but for me the gloomiest of all things was the detached, almost academic, air with 
>which the grim predictions were presented - almost as if we were discussing some other planet, not the Earth."
>
>Professor Lovelock intends The Revenge of Gaia to be a "wake-up call" to spread awareness that "the Earth is truly in 
>danger".
>
>Nuclear solution
>
>But is he right? Are the Earth's regulatory systems in crisis, with temperatures heading inexorably for a higher level, 
>unpleasant and perhaps uncontrollable?
>
>If he is, what should we make of his contention that renewable energy and the traditional concept of sustainable 
>development are misguided?
>
>Is he right to say that nuclear fission is the only way to provide humanity with the energy it needs until technologies 
>such as nuclear fusion and tidal power can be introduced to a substantial extent? Does "a lack of constraint on the 
>growth of population" lie at the root of modern environmental problems?
>
>Olkiluoto nuclear power station, Finland. Image: BBC
>Are new nuclear reactors like Finland's Olkiluoto the way forward?
>James Lovelock's genius has perhaps been to bring such threads together into a logical whole.
>
>"He is a superb scientist, an originator of the view of the Earth, including its life, as a complete interacting system 
>and an all-round free thinker," said Professor Brian Hoskins of Reading University who will chair the panel.
>
>"I hope we can explore Jim's views on why the problem of climate change is so serious, and see if we can agree that it 
>should be a clarion call for positive action rather than the bleak view that some have taken from it."
>
>Professor Lovelock is adamant that his book and his thesis is not defeatist, as some observers have suggested.
>
>"Only those lacking imagination would take the book as a counsel for despair," he said.
>
>"I am hoping that... The Revenge of Gaia will be taken seriously, together with the recognition that we may truly be in 
>grave danger and that few of the present inhabitants of the Earth are likely to survive beyond the 21st Century.
>
>"It would be wonderful to have positive and sensible suggestions for civilised adaptation."
>
>Richard.Black-INTERNET at bbc.co.uk
>
>Are the Earth's regulatory systems in crisis? Should we switch to nuclear fission? Send us your questions on the human 
>impact on the climate now.
>
>Click here to send us your questions
>
>
>
>E-mail this to a friend 	Printable version
>
>		
>Global warning? In depth
>
>Animated guide
>How the greenhouse effect works and its implications for climate
>
>KEY STORIES
>
>Backing for 'hockey stick' graph
>'Clear' human impact on climate
>Spacecraft seek climate clarity
>Air trends 'amplifying' warming
>
>FEATURES
>
>Blagging in the blogosphere
>Climate news: A load of hot air?
>Earth is too crowded for Utopia
>
>BACKGROUND
>
>Earth - melting in the heat?
>Q&A: Climate change
>Q&A: The Kyoto Protocol
>Climate: What science can tell us
>The big greenhouse gas emitters
>Warming: The evidence
>
>
>SEE ALSO
>World 'appeasing' climate threat
>03 Jun 04 |  Science/Nature
>Lost connection to animate Earth
>29 Jun 06 |  Science/Nature
>
>RELATED BBC LINKS
>BBC Radio Four - Today
>
>RELATED INTERNET LINKS
>Gaia Foundation
>The BBC is not responsible for the content of external internet sites
>
>
>
>_______________________________________________
>permaculture mailing list
>permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
>
>  
>



More information about the permaculture mailing list