[permaculture] disease / genetics

Keith Johnson keithdj at mindspring.com
Tue Mar 11 21:48:47 EST 2003


Fascinating. Perhaps Paul Stamets was really onto something when he 
said, "I think the mixing of the gene pool is very important. I'm the 
absolute oposite of a racist. I believe that the races should mix very, 
very quickly in order to prevent genetic diseases or other diseases so 
we can borrow the immunity from multiple cultures because our cultures 
are really under assault now. I believe in the preservation of native 
cultures...but from a biologists point of view, it is really important 
that we get every possible genetic advantage from every strain of human 
that ever existed at this point in time."

Shall we now suggest in our courses to marry outside our race...or at 
least be willing to "share" ? :-)
Sounds like a lot more fun than racism.
Keith



Rick Valley wrote:

>  
>
>>From: Claude Genest <genest at together.net>
>>( Jarred ?). DIAMOND- Guns, Germs and Steel
>>In any event, the hypothesis is that what gave Whitey a genetic advantage over
>>others with regards to immunity to disease, is that the Europeeans had
>>co-evolved in very close proximity to their domestic animals like pigs and
>>cows, animals not indigenouus in the Americas. As a result, they had evolved
>>immunities to the diseases caught from those animals, while the "Americans"
>>had not.
>>    
>>
>Which is one of the human/disease interactions; there's also the human/wild
>animal interaction (malaria, yellow fever, etc.) which is why we Euros
>"partnered" in much of our expansion with Africans and Asians; we weren't
>resistant enough to the tropical diseases. And in both cases it was the
>pattern of creatures from a larger land mass tending to move into a smaller
>land mass more successfully than vice-versa. And there is the human/animal
>partnership, which was more developed for the invaders (more domesticates,
>esp. large ones) and in large part due to the megafaunal massacre which took
>place during the initial human expansion into non Afro-Eurasian regions of
>the globe.
>And now it's fun to toss in Tim Flannery's observation that species that
>move into the Americas tend to rapid evolutionary diversification.
>One example would be the mixed origin peoples throughout the Americas-
>Garifuna, Seminole, Caboclo, etc. etc.; very interesting cultures all.
>
>-Rick
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
>_______________________________________________
>permaculture mailing list
>permaculture at lists.ibiblio.org
>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/permaculture
>
>  
>




More information about the permaculture mailing list