New Book: Farmer-to-Farmer Extension: Lessons from the Field (fwd)

Victor Guest vic at daena.eepo.com.au
Sat Aug 30 11:43:09 EDT 1997


I hope this may be of interest to Holistic and Permaculture educators.
Vic Guest. 

Sender: owner-SAED-SHARE-L at cornell.edu
Precedence: bulk
>************** BOOK ANNOUNCEMENT ***************
>
>    FARMER-TO-FARMER EXTENSION: LESSONS FROM THE FIELD
>
>by Daniel Selener, Jacqueline Chenier, Raul Zelaya et al. 1997. IIRR:
>New York. 150 pp. (Available in English and Spanish).

>      IIRR
>      Apartado Postal 17-08-8494
>      Quito, ECUADOR
>      (South America)
>
>FAX: (593-2) 443 763    or     e-mail:   daniel at iirr.ecx.ec
>
>This book is the result of two workshops, one in Honduras and another
>in Ecuador, that were conducted to document and analyze the experiences
>of several rural development projects, using the "farmer-to-farmer"
>extension methodology.
>
>It is important to emphasize that most of the information contained
>in the book is from the farmer promoters (*) points of view, based on many
>years of their practical experience working in farmer-to-farmer programs.
>
>The description and analysis presented offers a broad set of experiences.
>This information can be analyzed and adapted by the reader to his/her
>own project, according to the context, project philosophy, objectives,
>and available resources, among others.
>
>The book contents are:
>
>PART I:
>
>DESCRIPTION AND ANALYSIS OF THE COMPONENTS OF THE FARMER-TO-FARMER METHODOLOGY
>
>Chapter 1:  Introduction
>Chapter 2:  Characteristics of farmer promoters
>Chapter 3:  What is the work of farmer promoters?
>Chapter 4:  How do farmer promoters do their work?
>Chapter 5:  Selection of farmer promoters
>Chapter 6:  Generalist and specialist farmer promoters
>Chapter 7:  Work location: in their community or in other communities
>Chapter 8:  Volunteer, part-time, and full-time farmer promoters
>Chapter 9:  Salaries and job incentives for farmer promoters
>Chapter 10: Training and technical assistance for farmer promoters
>Chapter 11: Relationship between extension agents and farmer promoters
>Chapter 12: Women farmer promoters
>Chapter 13: Some final considerations
>
>PART II: CASE STUDIES
>
>Chapters 14 to 18 present 5 case studies from Mexico, Nicaragua and Ecuador.
>
>This book is especially useful for people working in different kinds
>of projects (agriculture, health, education, community development,
>etc.) following participatory approaches to rural development.
>
>HOW TO ORDER:
>
>Orders must be prepaid. The cost of the FARMER-TO-FARMER book is 15 US
>dollars, postage included. Please send check in US Dollars payable to IIRR,
>issued from a bank located in the US; or send check in any European
>currency (equivalent to 15 U$S) issued from a bank located in Europe.
>Mail checks to:
>
>      IIRR
>      Apartado Postal 17-08-8494
>      Quito, ECUADOR
>      (South America)
>
>If you need further information you can contact us at:
>
>FAX: (593-2) 443 763    or     e-mail:   daniel at iirr.ecx.ec
>
>
>(*) Farmer promoters are also known by a number of other names including:
>paraprofessionals, community educators or instructors, rural promoters,
>farmer extension agents, local facilitators, community promoters,
>indigenous facilitators, and village extensionists, among others.
>

***************************
Nancy Grudens Schuck
Doctoral Candidate

U.S. postal address

Department of Education
Kennedy Hall
Cornell University
Ithaca, New York 14853
U.S.A.

E-mail: ng13 at cornell.edu
FAX: (607) 255-7905

***************************




More information about the permaculture mailing list