[NAFEX] Hardy Citrus

Dr. Chiranjit Parmar parmarch at vsnl.com
Sun Jan 23 02:43:48 EST 2022


Dear NAFEXERs,

Please excuse me for my belated contribution to this topic.

The citrus fruits citrangequats are not ommercial fruits.  These are fancy fruits just meant for the sake of collection.

The cold hardy citrus fruits like Galgal ( Citrus pseudolimon ) and Japanese Summer Orange( Natsudaidai ) are not only cold hardy but are also commercial.  These are widely cultivated and utilized in their respective countries.  So I think these fruits or other fruits of similar commercial value should get more attention.

Dr. Chiranjit Parmar
Horticultural Consultant on Lesser Known Indian Fruits
www.lesserknownindianplants.com

  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: Mark Lee 
  To: nafex at lists.ibiblio.org 
  Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2003 10:57 PM
  Subject: RE: [NAFEX] Hardy Citrus


  Citrangequat is a cross between citrange and kumquat.  Citrange is a cross between sweet orange and trifoliate orange.  The bitterness comes from the trifoliate orange, which is one of the three contributors to the genetic makeup of this plant.  When fully ripe, the Thomasville Citrangequat is considered one of the best cold hardy citrus.  Most of the other cold hardy citrus are considered barely edible due bitterness and extreme sourness.  Here is an interesting quote I found on-line
  http://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/sundry_hybrids.html
  CITRANGEQUAT (Fortunella sp. X citrange). The first crosses were made by Dr. Swingle at Eustis, Florida, in 1909. Tree is vigorous, erect, thorny or thornless, with mostly trifoliolate leaves; highly cold-resistant. Fruit resembles the oval kumquat, mostly very acid. One cultivar, 'Thomasville', becomes edible when fully mature, though it is relatively seedy. It is very juicy, valued for eating out-of-hand, for ade and marmalade. The tree is strongly resistant to citrus canker and is very ornamental. Two other cultivars, 'Swinton' and 'Telfair', have few seeds, but are less desirable; have limited use for juice and as ornamentals.
   
  -Mark Lee, Seattle, z7
    -----Original Message-----
    From: nafex-admin at lists.ibiblio.org [mailto:nafex-admin at lists.ibiblio.org]On Behalf Of jamie
    Sent: Wednesday, January 15, 2003 8:55 AM
    To: nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
    Subject: RE: [NAFEX] Hardy Citrus


    Thanks for the link Mark. I did a web search and came up with some interesting varieties. Ultimately, the question comes down to just how palatable the Poncirus trifoliate crosses are (and the crosses of the crosses of the crosses - if you see what I mean). 

     

    It would seem possible however to grow citrus outside year round and have a decent fruit if watering and fleece are used to soften the worst frosts. Nagami Kumquat and Osawi Satsuma have been recommended. C.ichangensis and its varieties also. Does anyone have experience of these or further recommendations.

     

    Jamie

    Souscayrous USDA zone 8

     

    -----Original Message-----
    From: nafex-admin at lists.ibiblio.org [mailto:nafex-admin at lists.ibiblio.org]On Behalf Of Mark Lee
    Sent: mercredi 15 janvier 2003 16:14
    To: nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
    Subject: RE: [NAFEX] Hardy Citrus

     

    What is the minimum temperature that galgal can survive?  

     

    I recently found Thomasville Citrangequat which can be grown unprotected at -10C (14F) and protected at -15C (5F).  The fruit it produces is very seedy and is similar to a lime.  Here is a link to a page with a good picture of the fruit.

    http://www.junglegardens.co.uk/PlantOrders/en-gb/dept_13.html

    I haven't grow this personally, but I thought I would give it a try this year.

    -Mark Lee, Seattle z7

     

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20220123/ad1fdd40/attachment.html 


More information about the nafex mailing list