[nafex] paw paw taste -pawpaw-associated illness

Louis Pittman lpittman at murraystate.edu
Tue Nov 24 08:54:20 EST 2020


Not sure thatanyone has identified exactly what causes that gastronomic
upheaval, but dried pawpaw/pawpaw fruit leather is a no-no!

Heck, 15 years ago, I 'poisoned' a bunch of coworkers when I took a batch
of pawpaw cookies to the office and shared them at the break table. The lab
director spent 3 days at home, in close proximity to the toilet...thought
he was gonna have to go into the hospital for IV fluids.  I've not yet
lived that down...former coworkers still rib me about those pawpaw cookies.

On Tue, Nov 24, 2020, 7:45 AM Elizabeth Hilborn <ehilborn at mebtel.net> wrote:

> I dry much of my fruit as I can't eat it all fresh nor do I have the
> freezer space.
>
> A memorable experiment was dried pawpaw.
> Slices of beautiful, ripe fruit set in my dehydrator. Dried to
> perfection. Imagine my delight when I first tasted the dried fruit.
> Sweet, fruity, leathery, but easy to chew. I ate a single piece then
> went out to do evening farm chores. Within an hour I started feeling
> bad. Abdominal pain then a building nausea.
>
> I was not able to eat dinner that evening. Felt well in the morning.
>
> The next evening as I unloaded the dehydrator I ate another piece of
> dried pawpaw. Again within an hour, the same deal- pain, nausea. I had
> to go lay down for the night. Again, no dinner.
>
> Maybe some people do not feel well after eating the fresh fruit and stop
> enjoying it over time.
>
> I have NO idea why dried pawpaw does this to me while I can still eat
> (and enjoy) fresh pawpaw.
>
> Any ideas?
>
> Elizabeth
>
> On 11/24/2020 8:25 AM, Lee Reich wrote:
> > I think it takes a certain amount of eating pawpaws to lose your taste
> for them. I’ve noticed this in other once-pawpaw-enthusiasts also.
> >
> > Lee
> > Lee Reich, PhD
> > Come visit my farmden at
> > http://www.leereich.com/blog <http://www.leereich.com/blog>
> > http://leereich.com <http://leereich.com/>
> >
> > Books by Lee Reich:
> > •The Ever Curious Gardener: Using a Little Natural Science for a Much
> Better Garden
> > •A Northeast Gardener’s Year
> > •The Pruning Book
> > •Weedless Gardening
> > •Uncommon Fruits for every Garden
> > •Landscaping with Fruit
> > •Grow Fruit Naturally
> >
> >> On Nov 24, 2020, at 5:47 AM, Elizabeth Hilborn <ehilborn at mebtel.net>
> wrote:
> >>
> >> I have only tasted two named varieties Mango and Shenandoah.  They were
> both delicious, sweet, fruity, bright without the taste/smell of overripe
> banana (tang) that the wild fruits contain.
> >>
> >> There was a 6 year gap between tasting them so I cannot compare their
> tastes directly. I do remember the mango surprised me with its
> deliciousness.
> >>
> >> In my experience, the selected varieties are worth the effort. That is
> why I keep trying to buy grafted trees and to graft my sprouts.
> >>
> >> Elizabeth
> >>
> >> On 11/24/2020 5:41 AM, Alan Haigh wrote:
> >>> I believe that some people can taste the slight toxic tang of paw paws
> and
> >>> some can't.  Those that can't think they are absolutely delicious and
> those
> >>> that can are never big fans. Unfortunately, like Lee,  I fall in the
> latter
> >>> group.
> >>>
> >>> I've never tasted a Peterson variety, though.
> >>> __________________
> >> ps://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>
>
> --
> Elizabeth Hilborn, DVM
> Bee Well Mobile Veterinary Services, PLLC
> beewellvet.com
>
> __________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> https://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>


More information about the nafex mailing list