[nafex] nurse limbs

alexis alex at conev.org
Sun Apr 24 17:31:42 EDT 2016


My experience is that the question of nurse limbs relates more to size 
that to species. On larger caliper rootstock (anything over an inch 
maybe) a nurse limb is a must. Just too much shock to the root 
otherwise. On smaller stuff, the nurse limb is generally not necessary 
(in my experience....) I do a lot of "field grating" persimmons. Smaller 
stuff always does fine without a nurse limb. I have never noticed that 
nurse limbs do much harm either. The "sapping away energy" has not been 
a problem in my experience. On transplanted rootstock, I will sometimes 
leave live material from the rootstock on there, to help support the 
root, for the first summer at least (on a spring graft). You HAVE to 
take that away next year, and stay on top of it thereafter.
two cents
alexis


On 04/24/2016 02:40 PM, nafex-request at lists.ibiblio.org wrote:
> Send nafex mailing list submissions to
> 	nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> 	http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> 	nafex-request at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> 	nafex-owner at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of nafex digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>     1.  Nurse limbs - which grafting situations need them, where are
>        they counterproductive? (Elizabeth Hilborn)
>     2. Re:  Nurse limbs - which grafting situations need them, where
>        are they counterproductive? (Jerry Lehman)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 13:27:47 -0400
> From: Elizabeth Hilborn <ehilborn at mebtel.net>
> To: mailing list at ibiblio - Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
> 	<nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: [nafex] Nurse limbs - which grafting situations need them,
> 	where are they counterproductive?
> Message-ID: <571D0213.6030801 at mebtel.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed
>
> I have had good experiences using nurse limbs when grafting to apple and
> pear root sprouts. However, now I am grafting to native persimmon
> rootsprouts and wonder if nurse limbs will be counterproductive by
> drawing too much energy and nutrients away from my graft.
>
> Does any one have experience using this technique and would consider it
> beneficial when grafting to persimmon, pawpaw or hickory?
>
> Betsy Hilborn
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Sun, 24 Apr 2016 14:39:50 -0400
> From: Jerry Lehman <jwlehmantree at gmail.com>
> To: mailing list at ibiblio - Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
> 	<nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Subject: Re: [nafex] Nurse limbs - which grafting situations need
> 	them, where are they counterproductive?
> Message-ID: <571D12F6.60702 at gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252; format=flowed
>
> On 4/24/2016 1:27 PM, Elizabeth Hilborn wrote:
>> I have had good experiences using nurse limbs when grafting to apple
>> and pear root sprouts. However, now I am grafting to native persimmon
>> rootsprouts and wonder if nurse limbs will be counterproductive by
>> drawing too much energy and nutrients away from my graft.
>>
>> Does any one have experience using this technique and would consider
>> it beneficial when grafting to persimmon, pawpaw or hickory?
> Hello Betsy,
>
> I never use nurse limbs for the very reason that you stated above, I cut
> everything off below the graft. And on all species.
>
> There was a member of the Indiana Nut and Fruit Growers whose name was
> Jim Wood who had many nut trees, especially pecan. Because of the
> problem of bleeding when grafting nut trees he developed what he called
> the " Sap Stopper Graft. " He did a lot of grafting on pecan trees 6
> inches in diameter and more. What he did was cut about half way through
> a six-inch tree for example then push the top over on the ground so that
> was still attached. This seemed to divert the sap from the cut area
> which he then grafted. Then after the graft was well-established and
> growing he would finish cutting off the half that was now laying on the
> ground. I've seen some of his work and it seemed like is a viable method.
>
> Jerry
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Subject: Digest Footer
>
> __________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Northamerican Allied Fruit Experimenters
> subscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>
> ------------------------------
>
> End of nafex Digest, Vol 178, Issue 2
> *************************************
>



More information about the nafex mailing list