[nafex] Pomona time!

Jackie jakuehn at verizon.net
Mon Jan 14 21:47:57 EST 2013


We're calling for articles, NAFEXers. Send them as son as you can, but you've got several weeks to work, too.

Thanks!


Jacquelyn A. Kuehn

pennsacreskitchen.net
wmugradio.org




On Jan 12, 2013, at 12:00 PM, nafex-request at lists.ibiblio.org wrote:

> Send nafex mailing list submissions to
> 	nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> 
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> 	http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> 	nafex-request at lists.ibiblio.org
> 
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> 	nafex-owner at lists.ibiblio.org
> 
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of nafex digest..."
> 
> 
> Today's Topics:
> 
>   1. Re:  Mulberry commercial potentials
>      (Scott Weber and Muffy Barrett)
>   2. Re:  Mulberry commercial potentials (Spidra Webster)
>   3.  Hawthorns - best varieties (Steven Covacci)
>   4. Re:  Hawthorns - best varieties (Matt Demmon)
>   5. Re:  Mulberry commercial potentials (mIEKAL aND)
>   6. Re:  Mulberry commercial potentials (Spidra Webster)
>   7.  Mulberry commercial potentials (Jwlehman at aol.com)
> 
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Message: 1
> Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2013 17:33:29 GMT
> From: "Scott Weber and Muffy Barrett" <bluestem_farm at juno.com>
> Subject: Re: [nafex] Mulberry commercial potentials
> To: nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Message-ID: <20130111.113329.16092.0 at webmail11.dca.untd.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=windows-1252
> 
> I grew up with mulberries in the back yard, and although I ate loads of them I've never considered trying to grow them for market because they were always crawling with some sort of tiny insects--springtails, maybe?--and Americans are generally way too finicky to tolerate that.  I'd think that if you had a market any variety that you could harvest efficiently would work.   Good luck with it.
> Muffy Barrett
> 
> 
> ---------- Original Message ----------
> , Bass Samaan  wrote:
>> Have anyone considered Mulberry as a marketable fruit?
>> What varieties have a potential for the fresh market in the 
>> NorthEast?
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Bass Samaan
>> Zone 6, PA
>> www.Treesofjoy.com
>> bassgarden at gmail.com
> 
> __________________
> nafex mailing list 
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> aubscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> message archives
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex 
> Google message archive search:
> site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex [searchstring] 
> nafex list mirror sites:
> http://nafexlist.blogspot.com/
> http://groups.google.com/group/nafexlist
> https://sites.google.com/site/nafexmailinglist
> Avant Geared  http://www.avantgeared.com
> 
> ____________________________________________________________
> Woman is 53 But Looks 25
> Mom reveals 1 simple wrinkle trick that has angered doctors...
> http://thirdpartyoffers.juno.com/TGL3131/50f04d2286ba34d2234ffst03duc
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 2
> Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2013 09:39:12 -0800
> From: Spidra Webster <spidra at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [nafex] Mulberry commercial potentials
> To: nafex mailing list at ibiblio <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID:
> 	<CACPFkVKZbBOrTDmW7h7So=DLv7gjanmMeGMTQ2PY56fMBAsE4A at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
> 
> I don't know what the potential is in your region, but my brother started a
> cottage business selling mulberries at the local farmers market. And that
> expanded into selling mulberries to top chefs directly as well.
> 
> http://metromulberries.com/
> 
> http://www.localharvest.org/metromulberries-M24180
> 
> <http://www.localharvest.org/metromulberries-M24180>I know Illinois
> Everbearing is a favorite of his.
> 
> 
> Megan Lynch
> http://www.meganlynch.net
> 
> <http://www.meganlynch.net>South Pasadena, CA
> 
> Zone 10a
> 
> On Thu, Jan 10, 2013 at 1:47 PM, Bass Samaan <bassgarden at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> Growing up in the Mediterranean region, Mulberries were commonly sold by
>> street fruit vendors in season, both the white and the black varieties. The
>> mulberry tree is so adaptable to most regions in the states, especially
>> Morus Alba, but we still don't see this in any super market, or farm
>> markets. Recently one of our local farm market asked me if I would know
>> what is the name of the fruit that their Middle eastern customers refer to
>> as "Tout" (Arabic, and Persian word for Mulberry). They said several
>> customer have been asking for it. Asked if I can sell them fresh fruit in
>> season.
>> I currently grow 3 varieties, Collier, Greece, and Illinois Everbearing.
>> Have anyone considered Mulberry as a marketable fruit?
>> What varieties have a potential for the fresh market in the NorthEast?
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Bass Samaan
>> Zone 6, PA
>> www.Treesofjoy.com
>> bassgarden at gmail.com
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 3
> Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2013 13:29:13 -0500 (EST)
> From: Steven Covacci <filtertitle at aol.com>
> Subject: [nafex] Hawthorns - best varieties
> To: nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Message-ID: <8CFBE40B06591F0-13B0-A7B0 at webmail-d062.sysops.aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
> 
> 
> 
> I'm interested in growing excellent types of hawthorns.
> According to Ken Fern (Plants for a Future), a European species: Crataegus schraderana is exceptionally delicious.  I don't know of a source for it in the US.  Any ideas?
> Natives: I have a seed-propgated 'Homestead' (C. x arnoldiana).  C. arnoldiana (including C. mollisa and C. submollis) are considered some of the best; perhaps for size, if not that and flavor.  C. flava is supposed to be good, along with C. succulenta. 
> I'm getting a native Crataegus from NY - from Schlabach's Nursery known as 'Heart's Delight', which is supposedly very good.
> Steve NJ
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 4
> Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2013 13:53:34 -0500
> From: Matt Demmon <mdemmon at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [nafex] Hawthorns - best varieties
> To: nafex mailing list at ibiblio <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID:
> 	<CAJJY6BOaotQw6m+M71GLZ=LJ8VLhULbssT7k+C_sp4LBbbzfNg at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
> 
> I don't remember the species names, but I noticed that One Green World had
> several different groups of hawthorns for sale this time around, including
> Mayhaw from the S. United States, Azarole from Italy, and a hawthorn from
> China. All claimed to be hardy to z5.
> 
> -matt
> 
> On Fri, Jan 11, 2013 at 1:29 PM, Steven Covacci <filtertitle at aol.com> wrote:
> 
>> 
>> 
>> I'm interested in growing excellent types of hawthorns.
>> According to Ken Fern (Plants for a Future), a European species: Crataegus
>> schraderana is exceptionally delicious.  I don't know of a source for it in
>> the US.  Any ideas?
>> Natives: I have a seed-propgated 'Homestead' (C. x arnoldiana).  C.
>> arnoldiana (including C. mollisa and C. submollis) are considered some of
>> the best; perhaps for size, if not that and flavor.  C. flava is supposed
>> to be good, along with C. succulenta.
>> I'm getting a native Crataegus from NY - from Schlabach's Nursery known as
>> 'Heart's Delight', which is supposedly very good.
>> Steve NJ
>> 
>> __________________
>> nafex mailing list
>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>> aubscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>> message archives
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex
>> Google message archive search:
>> site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex [searchstring]
>> nafex list mirror sites:
>> http://nafexlist.blogspot.com/
>> http://groups.google.com/group/nafexlist
>> https://sites.google.com/site/nafexmailinglist
>> Avant Geared  http://www.avantgeared.com
>> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 5
> Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2013 13:51:03 -0600
> From: mIEKAL aND <qazingulaza at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [nafex] Mulberry commercial potentials
> To: nafex mailing list at ibiblio <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID:
> 	<CAKVWZJc7PC+S78_ggBq5CoAcTZLy5MJy7FCksGLVdceLvRS70A at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
> 
> But how to grow the trees so they are easy to pick?  I have a couple
> Russian Mulberries that I pollarded at about 4 feet and that seems
> like it might have potential.
> 
> I've planted out about 20 Illinois Everbearing with the hopes of
> making wine, but I'm hesitant to plant more until I know if there is
> an easy way to harvest them and also if the birds will even allow me
> to harvest anything at all.
> 
> ~mIEKAL
> 
> 
> 
> On Fri, Jan 11, 2013 at 11:39 AM, Spidra Webster <spidra at gmail.com> wrote:
>> I don't know what the potential is in your region, but my brother started a
>> cottage business selling mulberries at the local farmers market. And that
>> expanded into selling mulberries to top chefs directly as well.
>> 
>> http://metromulberries.com/
>> 
>> http://www.localharvest.org/metromulberries-M24180
>> 
>> <http://www.localharvest.org/metromulberries-M24180>I know Illinois
>> Everbearing is a favorite of his.
>> 
>> 
>> Megan Lynch
>> http://www.meganlynch.net
>> 
>> <http://www.meganlynch.net>South Pasadena, CA
>> 
>> Zone 10a
>> 
>> On Thu, Jan 10, 2013 at 1:47 PM, Bass Samaan <bassgarden at gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>>> Growing up in the Mediterranean region, Mulberries were commonly sold by
>>> street fruit vendors in season, both the white and the black varieties. The
>>> mulberry tree is so adaptable to most regions in the states, especially
>>> Morus Alba, but we still don't see this in any super market, or farm
>>> markets. Recently one of our local farm market asked me if I would know
>>> what is the name of the fruit that their Middle eastern customers refer to
>>> as "Tout" (Arabic, and Persian word for Mulberry). They said several
>>> customer have been asking for it. Asked if I can sell them fresh fruit in
>>> season.
>>> I currently grow 3 varieties, Collier, Greece, and Illinois Everbearing.
>>> Have anyone considered Mulberry as a marketable fruit?
>>> What varieties have a potential for the fresh market in the NorthEast?
>>> 
>>> 
>>> 
>>> Bass Samaan
>>> Zone 6, PA
>>> www.Treesofjoy.com
>>> bassgarden at gmail.com
>> __________________
>> nafex mailing list
>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>> aubscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>> message archives
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex
>> Google message archive search:
>> site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex [searchstring]
>> nafex list mirror sites:
>> http://nafexlist.blogspot.com/
>> http://groups.google.com/group/nafexlist
>> https://sites.google.com/site/nafexmailinglist
>> Avant Geared  http://www.avantgeared.com
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 6
> Date: Fri, 11 Jan 2013 11:55:13 -0800
> From: Spidra Webster <spidra at gmail.com>
> Subject: Re: [nafex] Mulberry commercial potentials
> To: nafex mailing list at ibiblio <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID:
> 	<CACPFkVJEFzhohkh5goU7pSPx+hbVkVHiuXF1T100D8WsWMeAdg at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1
> 
> Apparently he grows them as espaliered trees. I don't get along well with
> my brother so I haven't asked him about it all despite the fact that we
> both love growing fruit trees.
> 
> 
> Megan Lynch
> http://www.meganlynch.net
> 
> South Pasadena, CA
> Zone 10a
> 
> On Fri, Jan 11, 2013 at 11:51 AM, mIEKAL aND <qazingulaza at gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> But how to grow the trees so they are easy to pick?  I have a couple
>> Russian Mulberries that I pollarded at about 4 feet and that seems
>> like it might have potential.
>> 
>> I've planted out about 20 Illinois Everbearing with the hopes of
>> making wine, but I'm hesitant to plant more until I know if there is
>> an easy way to harvest them and also if the birds will even allow me
>> to harvest anything at all.
>> 
>> ~mIEKAL
>> 
>> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Message: 7
> Date: Sat, 12 Jan 2013 09:45:11 -0500 (EST)
> From: Jwlehman at aol.com
> Subject: [nafex] Mulberry commercial potentials
> To: nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Message-ID: <8c29.3e44cb62.3e22d0f7 at aol.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
> 
> In a message dated 1/11/2013 4:58:43 PM Eastern Standard Time, 
> qazingulaza at gmail.com writes:
> 
>> I've planted out about 20 Illinois Everbearing with the hopes of making 
>> wine, but I'm hesitant to plant more until I know if there is an easy way to 
>> harvest them and also if the birds will even allow me to harvest anything 
>> at all.
>> 
> 
> The big problem with Illinois Everbearing is the long ripening period with 
> low crop yield at any one time making it difficult to collect large enough 
> quantities for processing. The answer has to be a large number of trees. For 
> one thing large enough to feed all the birds as well as collect fruit. 
> Illinois Everbearing is a fantastic fruit. Better than any pure black I've ever 
> tasted and I've tasted many.  
> 
> We collect fruits from our Black Mulberry trees by spreading bed sheets 
> under the trees then using long poles shake the limbs. Then float out the bugs 
> and use. There will still be a little protein in the cobbler, but after 
> cooking who cares.  Mulberry/raspberry cobbler or pie....YUM YUM.
> 
> Oh, we don't pick off the stems. Also don't leave the sheets under the tree 
> very long as they also collect bird droppings. 
> 
> Jerry
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> __________________
> nafex mailing list 
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> aubscribe/unsubscribe|user config|list info:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> message archives
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex 
> Google message archive search:
> site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex [searchstring] 
> nafex list mirror sites:
> http://nafexlist.blogspot.com/
> http://groups.google.com/group/nafexlist
> https://sites.google.com/site/nafexmailinglist
> Avant Geared  http://www.avantgeared.com
> 
> End of nafex Digest, Vol 120, Issue 9
> *************************************



More information about the nafex mailing list