[nafex ibiblio list] NAFEX fora

John S swim_at_svc at yahoo.com
Wed Dec 21 00:32:43 EST 2011


Lawrence,

Thank you for this post.  It will take me a while to work through the resources reference in it but appears valuable to me.

I also appreciate the article about Lingonberries, very worthwhile but not seen often enough.  I would, however, quibble that lingonberry fruits are not like cranberries except for tartness and that the article did not mention the variety "Ida", which in my garden is far superior to the 7+ other named varieties (including some of those mentioned in the article), produces two crops and more fruit than the others.

Thank you for your efforts on our behalf.

John



--- On Tue, 12/20/11, Lawrence F. London, Jr. <lflj at bellsouth.net> wrote:

> From: Lawrence F. London, Jr. <lflj at bellsouth.net>
> Subject: Re: [nafex ibiblio list] NAFEX fora
> To: "nafex ibiblio mailing list" <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Date: Tuesday, December 20, 2011, 11:36 PM
> On 12/20/2011 9:11 PM, Claude
> Jolicoeur wrote:
> 
> > And as Rivka says, the Pomona printed journal has
> > taken a lot of its material from the list - and
> > as far as I recall, even issues not that old
> > still used material from this list
> 
> 
> For what its worth there are other forums where useful
> information may 
> be gleaned and used in publications. Here are fruit
> archives I put 
> together over the years, mostly back in the 1990's:
> http://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech/orgfarm/fruit/
> Among other documents this contains saved articles from two
> Usenet 
> newsgroups, sci.agriculture.fruit and
> alt.agriculture.fruit, when they 
> were active. There may be much useful material in this
> archive, all 
> viewable online or downloadable. This kind of thing used to
> be freely 
> distributed on the Internet often as arrays of FAQs. The
> Usenet 
> newsgroup archives will need to be downloaded and viewed
> with an ascii 
> text editor (wordpad, textpad or other). There's plenty of
> spam mixed in 
> with the good articles, unfortunately.
> 
> Here are samples of the content:
> 
> http://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech/orgfarm/fruit/faqs/Dr.Razbys-berry-info/
>     Dr.Razbys.Berry-News   
> 19-Apr-1995 23:10    2.9K
>     raspberry.faq   
> 19-Apr-1995 23:08     10K
>    
> raspberry.growing+research    19-Apr-1995
> 23:09    4.5K
>     wild-blueberry.faq   
> 19-Apr-1995 23:08     11K
> http://www.ibiblio.org/ecolandtech/orgfarm/fruit/faqs/
>     Dr.Razbys-berry-info/   
> 20-Apr-1995 00:59     -
>    
> Fruit-Newsgroup.draft-FAQ    15-Aug-1996
> 23:06    1.7K
>     INDEX    23-Apr-1995
> 23:28    268
>    
> The-Mighty-Lingonberry.by-R.E.Gough   
> 03-Oct-1994 10:45    9.6K
>     blueberry.faq   
> 18-Jul-1994 13:29    6.0K
>     currant-facts.RB   
> 03-Nov-1999 21:58     17K
>    
> fruit-tree-grafting.faq.1-95    30-Jul-1993
> 21:59    5.1K
>    
> fruit.tree.grafting.faq    09-Aug-1993
> 19:03    4.8K
>     gardening-FAQs.txt   
> 31-Oct-1999 16:08    6.5K
>     rare-fruit.faq   
> 01-Aug-1993 22:04    2.0K
>    
> some-gardening-FAQs-on-the-Web    31-Oct-1999
> 16:08    4.3K
>     tangerine-mandarin.faq   
> 03-Mar-1994 13:11     32K
>     tangerine.faq   
> 17-Feb-1993 11:11    4.4K
>     tangerine.faq.new   
> 23-Apr-1993 22:43     18K
> 
> Date: 23 Apr 93 17:29:13 EDT
> From: Rick Harrison <71174.2735 at CompuServe.COM>
> Subject: Tangerine FAQ [revised]
> 
> A DIRECTORY OF MANDARINS / TANGERINES AND THEIR
> HYBRIDS       1993.04
>          Rick Harrison, PO
> Box 54-7014, Orlando FL 32854, USA
> Internet e-mail: 71174.2735 at compuserve.com 
>       phone: 407-645-3031
> 
> Mandarins/tangerines are citrus fruits and trees of the
> species
> _Citrus_reticulata_ Blanco.  They are distinguished
> from other citrus
> species by the relatively loose skin of the fruits, the
> relative ease
> with which the segments can be separated, and (in most
> cultivars) the
> green cotyledons.  Most varieties also contain
> chemical compounds not
> found in other citrus species: _thymol_ in the leaves and
> _tangeretin_
> in the fruits.  Some experts consider the varieties
> King, Satsuma,
> Cleopatra and Ponkan to be separate species unto
> themselves.
> 
> If you live in an area that doesn't have hard freezes, you
> can grow
> tangerine trees outdoors; they usually require little
> attention after
> they have established themselves.  In colder areas,
> they can be grown
> in greenhouses or in portable containers.  Although I
> am trying to
> gather data on all known varieties, I have limited this
> list to
> varieties readily available in the United States and
> varieties of
> commercial importance elsewhere.
> 
> hardiness = tolerance to cold; season = when the fruit is
> ripe (this
> varies depending on climate); holds = how well the fruit
> lasts on the
> tree after maturing; size, shape, base, apex, etc. =
> description of fruit
> 
> +-----------+
> | mandarins |
> +-----------+
> 
>     variety: Clementine (a.k.a. Algerian)
>        tree: medium, spreading or
> weeping habit, nearly thornless
>      leaves: dark green above and
> lighter on underside; dense foliage
>      season: Dec Jan Feb
>       holds: well
>        size: medium, diam. 2 to
> 2.5, height 2 to 2.75
>       shape: globose to ovoid, somewhat
> irregular
>        base: evenly rounded to
> slightly necked, with radiating furrows
>        apex: depressed
>        axis: large, hollow
>       color: deep orange-red
>     surface: smooth, glossy, slightly pitted
>        rind: medium thick, 1/8 to
> 3/16, loose
> oil glands: prominent, large, elliptical, depressions over
> primary ones
>    segments: 8 to 12, slight adherence
>        pulp: tender, melting, deep
> orange
>      flavor: sweet
>       seeds: 0 to 6, medium size, oblong to
> fusiform; embryo pistache green
>     history: discov in Algeria, came to FL 1909
>       notes: seedless and self-fertile in
> some relatively arid climates, 
> but
>          
>    requires pollination from Dancy, Kinnow,
> Orlando, Valencia 
> in FL;
>          
>    produces best fruit in deserts of
> California and Arizona; an
>          
>    important commercial variety in the
> Mediterranean area
> 
>     variety: Cleopatra (a.k.a. Spice)
>        tree: low, spreading, dense
> foliage, attractive
>      leaves: small, dark green
>      season: Jan Feb
>        size: small, up to 2 inch
> diam.
>       shape: oblate
>        base: flat
>        apex: depressed, generally
> navel marked
>       color: deep red-orange
>     surface: somewhat rough
>        rind: very loose, up to 1/8
> thick
>        pulp: coarse-grained,
> orange
>      flavor: tart
>       seeds: numerous, small
>     history: came from Jamaica to Florida before
> 1888
>       notes: used as rootstock for other
> varieties; possibly identical
>              with
> Ponki, which is used as a rootstock in Japan
> 
>     variety: Dancy (formerly a.k.a. Moragne,
> Bijou)
>   hardiness: hardy
>        tree: medium-large, erect,
> nearly thornless
>      leaves: broadly lanceolate, 3 to
> 4.75 inches long
>      season: Nov Dec Jan
>       holds: fair
>        size: medium, diam. 2.25 to
> 3, height 1.5 to 2.125
>       shape: oblate
>        base: usually necked, more
> or less corrugated
>        apex: broadly depressed
>       color: deep red-orange
>     surface: smooth, glossy
>        rind: thin, 1/8 to 3/16,
> leathery, easily removed
>    segments: 10 to 14, easily separated
>        pulp: melting, tender, dark
> orange
>    vesicles: short, broad, relatively large
>      flavor: rich and sprightly,
> pleasant aroma
>       seeds: 6 to 20, short, blunt or
> beaked; cotyledons pistache green
>     history: introduced into cultivation 1871
>       notes: Does best in Florida. 
> Recently this variety's susceptibility
>              to
> alternaria has been a problem in commercial groves.
> 
>     variety: Dweet
>    category: mandarin (hybrid: Dancy x
> Mediterranean)
>        tree: medium, open habit
>      season: late
>        size: medium-large
>       shape: ovoid with a slight neck
>       color: red-orange
>      flavor: rich
>       notes: does well in coastal and
> interior California
> 
>     variety: Emperor
>      season: Nov Dec Jan Feb
>        size: large, avg. diam.
> 2.5, height 1.75
>       shape: oblate, sometimes has a "neck"
>       color: pale orange
>        base: sometimes necked
>        rind: moderately thin, easy
> to peel
>    segments: 9 to 10, sometimes irregular
>        pulp: pale orange color
>       seeds: 10 to 16, long and pointed
>       notes: widely grown in Australia early
> in 20th century
> 
>     variety: Encore
>    category: mandarin (hybrid: King x
> Mediterranean)
>        tree: medium,
> upright/spreading habit, few or no thorns
>      season: Mar Apr May Jun
>       holds: well
>       color: yellow-orange speckled with
> dark orange-to-brown spots
>        rind: easily peeled
>      flavor: rich
>       seeds: many
>     history: introduced by University of
> California at Riverside;
>          
>    consumers often assume the dark spots on
> the rind are
>              a sign
> of decay
> 
>     variety: Honey
>    category: mandarin (hybrid: King x
> Mediterranean)
>        tree: medium-to-large,
> vigorous, spreading
>      season: early
>       holds: well
>        size: small to medium
>       color: yellow-orange
>        rind: easily peeled
>      flavor: very sweet
>       seeds: many
>       notes: beware of name confusion;
> Murcott tangors are sometimes
>              called
> "Honey tangerines"; Minneola is a.k.a. Honeybell.
>              Honey
> is a commercial variety in California.
> 
>     variety: Kara
>    category: mandarin (hybrid: Owari Satsuma
> x King)
>   hardiness: sensitive
>        tree: medium, vigorous,
> spreading, nearly thornless
>      leaves: large, dark green, with
> drooping habit
>      season: Mar Apr May
>       holds: fair
>        size: medium, diam. 2 to 3,
> height 2.125 to 2.75
>       shape: medium oblate to nearly
> globose, often somewhat conical
>       color: orange
>     surface: moderately grained
>        rind: thin-to-medium, 1/8
> to 1/5, loose, tough
> oil glands: numerous, medium size; oil is abundant,
> aromatic
>      flavor: rich flavor, strong
> pleasant unique aroma
>       seeds: 12 to 20, plump, yellow-tinged
> or yellow-green cotyledons
>     history: H B Frost, CA Citrus Experiment
> Station, 1935
>       notes: best in interior California;
> sometimes grown for its juice
> 
>     variety: King (a.k.a. King of Siam)
>   hardiness: hardy
>        tree: upright, medium size,
> relatively open foliage
>      leaves: large, 3 to 4.25, broadly
> lanceolate, margins slightly crenate
>      season: Mar Apr May
>        size: large, diam. 2.5 to
> 3.75, height 2.25 to 3.5 inches
>       shape: oblate to near spherical
>        base: rounded or somewhat
> necked, wrinkled with short radiating 
> furrows
>        apex: flattened or
> depressed, marked by characteristic areole
>       color: yellow-orange to orange
>     surface: rough and bumpy
>        rind: thick, 3/16 to 5/16,
> tight but easily removed
> oil glands: large, depressions over main ones give finely
> pitted appearance
>      flavor: rich and sprightly
>       seeds: 5 to 15 or more, fusiform,
> plump, beaked, white cotyledons
>     history: from Saigon to Riverside CA 1880; to
> Winter Park FL 1882
>       notes: susceptible to sun scald due to
> thin foliage, limb breakage 
> due
>              to
> over-bearing; might be identical to Kunenbo grown in Japan
> 
>     variety: Kinnow
>    category: mandarin (hybrid: King x
> Willow-leaf)
>   hardiness: very hardy
>        tree: vigorous, large,
> erect, dense
>      leaves: medium size, rather thin
> and pliable
>      season: Jan Feb Mar Apr
>       holds: well
>        size: medium, diam. 2.125
> to 3, height 2 to 2.5
>       shape: slightly oblate
>       color: deep yellow-orange
>     surface: smooth, glossy, easily scars
>        rind: thin, 1/8, leathery,
> fairly easy to peel
> oil glands: conspicuous, oil is abundant and aromatic
>      flavor: rich, high sugar and
> moderate acid, unique pleasant aroma
>       seeds: 12 to 24, medium size,
> yellowish cotyledons
>     history: H B Frost, CA Citrus Experiment
> Station, 1935
>       notes: reportedly has outstanding
> flavor, attractive appearance;
>          
>    probably will do better in CA and AZ than
> in FL
> 
>     variety: Pixie
>    category: mandarin (offspring of Kincy)
>        tree: medium-large, with
> erect open habit
>      season: Apr May Jun
>        size: small to medium
>       color: yellow-orange
>        rind: easily peeled
>      flavor: mild
>       seeds: none
> 
>     variety: Ponkan (a.k.a. Warnurco, Chinese
> Honey Orange, Batangas)
>   hardiness: hardy? tender? (different sources give
> different data)
>        tree: small, upright
>      season: Nov Dec
>       holds: fair
>        size: large, diam. 2.75 to
> 3.25
>       shape: globose to oblate
>        base: flattened or somewhat
> necked, with irregular furrows
>        apex: deeply depressed,
> with radiating furrows, sometimes with navel
>        axis: large, hollow
>       color: orange
>     surface: smooth or finely papillate
>        rind: medium thick, loosely
> adherent
>      flavor: sweet, aromatic
>       seeds: few, small, plump, nearly
> smooth; green embryos
>     history: from China to FL 1892
> 
>     variety: Satsuma (a.k.a. Unshiu)
>   hardiness: very hardy (to 12'F when dormant)
>        tree: small to medium,
> spreading, slow-growing
>      leaves: (depends on strain)
>      season: Sep Oct Nov
>        size: medium to large
>       shape: oblate to spherical or slightly
> conical
>       color: orange to yellow-orange
>     surface: slightly rough
>        rind: thin, 1/8 to 3/16,
> tight but easily peeled
> oil glands: large and numerous
>      flavor: good, low acid
>       seeds: few
>     history: originated in Japan circa 1600,
> Japan to USA 1876
>       notes: pulp ripens before rind changes
> color; there are many 
> different
>          
>    strains, including Owari, Wase, Ikeda,
> Mikado; rootstock and
>              soil
> influence fruit quality; mutations and throwbacks common
> 
>     variety: Wilking
>    category: mandarin (hybrid: King x
> Willow-leaf)
>   hardiness: hardy
>        tree: medium, vigorous,
> columnar, dense
>      leaves: medium size, up to 4.75
> inches long
>      season: Jan Feb Mar Apr
>       holds: fair
>        size: medium, diam. 2.125
> to 3.125, height 1.75 to 3
>       shape: oblate
>       color: deep yellow-orange
>     surface: coarsely grained to nearly smooth
>        rind: thin to medium, 1/8
> to 1/6, brittle, loose
> oil glands: medium size, numerous, conspicuous; oil
> abundant, aromatic
>      flavor: rich, good, high sugar,
> moderate acid, distinctive aroma
>       seeds: 10 to 17, mostly plump,
> yellow-green cotyledons
>     history: developed by H Frost, CA Citrus
> Experiment Station, 1935
> 
>     variety: Willow-leaf (a.k.a. Mediterranean,
> China)
>   hardiness: hardy
>        tree: small to medium,
> broad, with fine willowy branches
>      leaves: small, narrow, lanceolate
>      season: Nov Dec Jan
>       holds: poorly
>        size: medium, diam. 2 to
> 2.5, height 1.75 to 2.25
>       shape: oblate to globose
>       color: yellow-orange
>     surface: smooth, glossy, segmentation
> visible
>        rind: thin, 1/16 to 1/8,
> loose
>      flavor: sweet, flavorful,
> distinctly aromatic
>       seeds: 15 to 20
>     history: from Italy to Louisiana circa 1845
>       notes: needs a hot, non-humid climate
> for best fruit
> 
> +-----------------------------+
> | tangerine x tangelo hybrids |
> +-----------------------------+
> 
>     variety: Fairchild
>    category: (hybrid: Clementine x Orlando)
>        tree: medium, rounded,
> dense, nearly thornless
>      season: early
>       holds: fair
>        size: medium-size
>       color: deep orange
>      flavor: sweet, rich
>       seeds: many
>     history: developed by J R Furr, released
> 1964
>       notes: does best in the low deserts of
> California and Arizona;
>              needs
> to be pollinated by other mandarins for best production
> 
>     variety: Lee
>    category: (hybrid: Clementine x Orlando)
>   hardiness: hardy
>      season: Oct Nov Dec
>        size: medium
>     surface: smooth
>        rind: adherent
>      flavor: good
>     history: developed by F E Gardner, released
> by USDA 1959
>       notes: pulp ripens before peel
> develops full orange color
> 
>     variety: Nova
>    category: (hybrid: Clementine x Orlando)
>      season: early
>        size: medium to large
>       shape: oblate
>       color: orange
>        rind: medium-thick,
> adherent but peelable
>     history: developed by F E Gardner, released
> by USDA in 1964
> 
>     variety: Page
>    category: (hybrid: Minneola x
> Clementine)
>        tree: medium, round, dense
> foliage, few thorns
>      season: Nov Dec
>       holds: well
>        size: small-to-medium
>       shape: nearly spherical (can pass for
> an orange)
>       color: orange
>        rind: medium-thin
>      flavor: rich
>     history: developed by F E Gardner, released
> by USDA 1963
>       notes: produces best fruit when
> pollinated by other varieties;
>              "great
> choice for fresh juice lovers"
> 
>     variety: Robinson
>    category: (hybrid: Clementine x Orlando)
>   hardiness: hardy
>      season: Oct Nov Dec
>       color: yellow-orange to orange
>        size: medium
>      flavor: mild (actually _bland_ in
> my humble opinion)
>     history: developed by F E Gardner, introduced
> in 1959
>       notes: best when pollinated by a
> tangelo or tangor; susceptible to
>              twig
> and stem dieback
> 
>     variety: Sunburst
>    category: (hybrid: Robinson x Osceola)
>   hardiness: hardy
>      season: Nov Dec Jan
>      flavor: sweet
>     history: introduced in 1979, developed by Dr.
> C. Jack Hearn
>       notes: best when pollinated by other
> varieties; resistant to
>              citrus
> snow scale; vulnerable to citrus rust mite
> 
> +----------+
> | tangelos |
> +----------+
> 
>     variety: K-Early
>    category: probably a tangelo
>      season: early -- the earliest
> mandarin
>       notes: developed by H J Webber and W T
> Swingle; fruit tends to
>              be
> bitter, with low sugar and low acid; grown by unscrupulous
>          
>    producers who get a high price for early
> fruit; K-Early looks
>              like
> Orlando tangelo, and the resulting guilt-by-association
>              has
> reduced the commercial market for Orlando tangelos
> 
>     variety: Minneola (a.k.a. Honeybell)
>    category: tangelo (Duncan x Dancy)
>   hardiness: hardy
>        tree: medium-large,
> vigorous, round
>      leaves: dark green, large
>      season: Dec Jan Feb
>       holds: well
>        size: large
>       shape: globose-ovoid with distinct
> "neck"
>       color: red-orange
>        rind: thick, brittle
>      flavor: rich, tangy
>       seeds: less than 10 on average
>       notes: best when pollinated by Dancy,
> Clementine, Kinnow, Temple
> 
>     variety: Orlando (a.k.a. Lake)
>    category: tangelo (Duncan x Dancy)
>   hardiness: "more cold-tolerant than Minneola"
>        tree: dark, distinctively
> cupped leaves
>      season: Nov Dec Jan
>        size: medium-large
>       color: orange
>        rind: strongly adherent
>      flavor: mildly sweet
>     history: bred by W T Swingle in 1911,
> released in 1931
>       notes: best when pollinated by Dancy,
> Clementine, Kinnow, Temple;
>              will
> grow in deserts of CA and AZ
> 
>     variety: Seminole
>    category: tangelo (Dancy x Duncan)
>        tree: medium to large,
> vigorous
>      season: Feb Mar Apr
>       holds: fair
>        size: medium-large
>       color: red-orange
>        rind: easily peeled
>      flavor: sprightly, tangy
>       seeds: many (22 average)
>     history: released 1931
> 
> +---------+
> | tangors |
> +---------+
> 
>     variety: Ambersweet
>    category: tangor+ ([Clementine x Orlando]
> x sweet orange)
>   hardiness: hardy
>      season: Oct Nov
>        size: 3 to 3.5 diam.
> 
>     variety: Fallglo
>    category: (hybrid: Bower x Temple)
>      season: Oct Nov
>     history: released by USDA 1987
> 
>     variety: Murcott
>    category: tangor
>   hardiness: semi-sensitive
>        tree: medium, upright
>      season: Jan Feb Mar
>        size: medium
>       color: yellow-orange
>     surface: smooth and somewhat glossy
>        rind: thin, tight but
> peelable
>      flavor: sweet, rich
>       seeds: 18 to 24
>     history: probably the result of Swingle's
> breeding experiments,
>              the
> parent tree lost its identification tag in transit to
>              Safety
> Harbor FL in 1913.
>       notes: slightly susceptible to scab
> fungus and xyloporosis
> 
>     variety: Tangerona
>    category: tangor
>   hardiness: sensitive
>      season: Sep Oct
>        size: small
>       shape: roundish oblate
>       color: yellow-orange
>        rind: tight
>      flavor: (reportedly) excellent
>       seeds: many
>     history: from Brazil to FL circa 1890
> 
>     variety: Temple
>    category: probably a tangor (parents
> unknown)
>   hardiness: tender
>        tree: spreading, bushy,
> somewhat thorny
>      leaves: medium size
>      season: Jan Feb Mar Apr
>       holds: fair
>        size: medium-large, diam.
> 2.5 to 3.25, height 2.25 to 2.5
>       shape: oblate to spherical
>       color: orange to red-orange
>     surface: slightly pebbled or rugose
>        rind: medium thick, 1/8 to
> 3/16, loose and peelable, leathery
> oil glands: spherical to elliptical
>    segments: 10 to 12
>        pulp: tender, melting,
> orange
>    vesicles: medium size, fusiform
>      flavor: rich and spicy
>       seeds: average 20, medium, plump
>     history: originated in Winter Park FL,
> distrib Buckeye Nurseries 1917
>       notes: somewhat susceptible to scab
> 
>     variety: Umatilla
>    category: tangor (Owari Satsuma x Ruby
> orange)
>      season: late
>        size: large
>       color: red-orange
>     surface: smooth
>     history: bred by W T Swingle in 1911,
> released in 1931
>       notes: good quality; fruit is size and
> shape of King
> 
> +--------------+
> | bibliography |
> +--------------+
> 
> Hume, H. Harold; Citrus fruits and their culture; 1904
> Jackson, Larry K.; Citrus growing in Florida; 3rd edition,
> University
>    of Florida Press, 1991
> Sturrock, David; Fruits for southern Florida; Southeastern
> Printing Co, 1959
> Webber & Batchelor, editors; The citrus industry --
> history, botany and
>    breeding; University of California, 1943
> 
> */ end of file /*
> 
> __________________
> nafex mailing list 
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Subscribe, unsubscribe, change user configuration, list
> information:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> Google command to search the list message archives, located
> here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex
> 
> site: lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex [searchstring] 
> nafex list mirror sites:
> http://nafexlist.blogspot.com/
> http://groups.google.com/group/nafexlist
> nafex list website (reference library)
> https://sites.google.com/site/nafexmailinglist
> 


More information about the nafex mailing list