[NAFEX] Apple bags vs. nylons

Bob Randall YearRoundGardening at comcast.net
Sun Sep 27 17:27:37 EDT 2009


I'm not sure if this will help.

For many years I have protected fruit here from pests with homemade  
bags made from black fiberglass window screening. I make them by  
taking a four foot wide roll and sawing it into 8 6-inch wide rolls of  
whatever length the screening was. Then I use ordinary scissors to cut  
strips 24 inches long, and then fold it to get a "bag" 6x6 inches that  
is two thicknesses thick.  I then staple it with an ordinary stapler.  
And put the bag on with a wooden clothes pin.

A roll of the screening costs about $5 at Lowe's or Home Depot.  And  
it probably doesn't take me a minute to make a bag that lasts many  
years.

The result is a very long lasting bag that keeps both birds and  
insects off until ripe.  They can be moved from peaches to apples to  
grapes to persimmons as the season progresses.

I have been doing this for more than a decade.  Occasionally birds  
figure it out and certainly they can peck through two layers of  
screening, but they rarely do if the fruit is covered before it is  
edible or turns color. We are in a very hot and humid area, so the  
screening dries quickly and doesn't build up heat.

Of course, this is practical only if bagging is not too labor  
intensive for your orchard.  I mostly eat what I grow, so it is  
manageable and well worth it, but I wouldn't try for a large planting.

Bob Randall


"Share What You Grow and What You Know!"

Bob Randall, Ph.D.
YearRoundGardening at comcast.net
713-661-9737



On Sep 26, 2009, at 10:59 PM, Michael Dossett wrote:

> We tried the nylons at my parent's place in Seattle and I can say it  
> will be the last time, but for a different reason.  The nylons did  
> absolutely nothing to stop our Coddling Moth problem.  Apple Maggot,  
> yes, coddling moth, no.  It seems like they just chewed right  
> through the nylons.  On top of that, as the apple expands and  
> stretches the nylon, they get runs in them just like a pair of panty  
> hose.  Once that happens, they are worthless.  It would be nice if  
> they were reuseable but 90% of ours weren't after one season..   
> Maybe we just did something wrong?
>
> Michael
>
>
> Michael Dossett
> Corvallis, Oregon
> www.Mdossettphoto.com
> phainopepla at yahoo.com
>
>
> --- On Sat, 9/26/09, Jim Fruth <jimfruth at charter.net> wrote:
>
>> From: Jim Fruth <jimfruth at charter.net>
>> Subject: [NAFEX] Apple bags vs. nylons
>> To: "NAFEX" <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
>> Date: Saturday, September 26, 2009, 7:26 AM
>>     This year I tested
>> "Apple Maggot Control Bags (nylon)" that I bought
>> from Raintree versus Zip-Lock Bags with unbagged apples for
>> a control.  It
>> will definitely be my last purchase of the nylon bags!
>>     Both bag types were effective against Apple
>> Maggot but fungi was a big
>> problem with the nylon bags.  Blotch and Fly Speck are
>> problems here that
>> affect the outer surface of apples.  Both wash off
>> with a bit of 'elbow
>> grease' and a Scotch Brite pad but having to clean every
>> apple is a nuisance
>> and not cost effective.
>>     Surprisingly, there was much more Blotch and
>> Fly Speck on the nylon
>> bagged apples than on the unbagged apples.
>> Predictably, only a few apples
>> with Zip Lock Bags had any and those that did had a small
>> amount at the stem
>> end.  An exception was that the earliest summer apples
>> (Beacon and Yellow
>> Transparent) were not affected with the fungi.
>>     In conclusion, it is nice that, unlike
>> plastic bags that break down
>> after being exposed to prolonged sunlight, the nylons can
>> be reused again.
>> I'll be using the nylons on my earliest summer apples and
>> all others will be
>> bagged with Zip Lock bags.
>>
>> Jim Fruth
>> Brambleberry Farm
>> Pequot Lakes, MN  56472
>> For jams, jellies, syrups and more:
>> www.jellygal.com
>> 1-877-265-6856 (Toll Free)
>> 1-218-831-7018 (My Cell)
>>
>> _______________________________________________
>> nafex mailing list
>> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>>
>> Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
>> This includes distribution on other email lists or
>> reproduction on web sites.
>> Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim
>> you have permission!
>>
>> **YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
>> Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are
>> discarded.
>> No exceptions.
>> ----
>> To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page
>> (also can be used to change other email options):
>> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>>
>> File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
>> TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
>> Please do not send binary files.
>> Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>>
>> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
>>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
> This includes distribution on other email lists or reproduction on  
> web sites.
> Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim you have  
> permission!
>
> **YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
> Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are discarded.
> No exceptions.
> ----
> To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can  
> be used to change other email options):
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>
> File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
> TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
> Please do not send binary files.
> Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>
> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/




More information about the nafex mailing list