[NAFEX] Steve's wildlife relocation comments

Jay Cutts cutts at cuttsreviews.com
Sat Sep 5 13:04:31 EDT 2009


Alan,

Have you tried keeping a Catholic priest around odd corners of the property to
deal with those Rabbi outbreaks?  Works for me.

Jay

> 
> The danger of where Steve is taking this discussion is that some might think
> how wildlife professionals deal with the relocation of bears justifies their
> unprofessional relocation of common fruit pests like raccoons and
> squirrels.  There is no relevance at all as far as moving pest animals to
> new sites.
> 
> I have about an acre of bearing fruit trees on my property of 3 acres.  I
> have had seasons where I've trapped as many as 30 raccoons which is simply
> an obscene quantity from any ecological viewpoint.  These animals are like
> outdoor rats (however beautiful you may find them) that thrive in the
> presence of humans.  Pet food and garbage have increased their numbers and
> human elimination of their predators has made any natural balancing
> impossible- short of an occasional rabbi outbreak or other disease.
> 
> What is the justification for the relocation of such an animal other than to
> spare someone the discomfort of having to kill it?  I often wonder how this
> raccoon population must affect songbirds and other wildlife.  Raccoons are
> well known bird nest raiders.
> 
> Speaking of birds, squirrels benefit from what I consider to be the ignorant
> feeding of birds.  Feeders deliver the majority of grain to rodents beneath
> them even if they are designed to deny rodents access.  The birds themselves
> knock most of the grain off while feeding.  I often see well developed rat
> tunnels beneath bird feeders.  In the west there will also be ground
> squirrel tunnels.  Red and Grey squirrels will swarm to bird feeding sites
> in winter when conditions would otherwise bring their populations down
> (naturally).
> 
> It's interesting that the managers of these feeders (homeowners) are
> probably demographically heavily slanted to putting a high priority on
> environmental issues.  I believe that it is far superior for homeowners to
> create a landscape that feeds birds in a more natural manner by establishing
> plantings that nourish their birds.
> 
> I have a very difficult time controlling squirrels and protecting fruit on
> sites where the homeowner maintains a bird feeder and in neighborhoods where
> such feeders are common.
> 
> The point I'm making is that species whose populations are exploding due to
> human intervention have no place to be relocated because adequate or
> excessive populations of the animals already exist most anywhere you can
> take them.  Only a wildlife expert would be aware if a given location would
> benefit from the addition of any given animal.
> 
> --00151747afcc5aad750472d34bf6
> Content-Type: text/html; charset=UTF-8
> Content-Transfer-Encoding: quoted-printable
> 
> <div>The danger of where Steve is taking this discussion is that some might=
>  think how wildlife professionals deal with the relocation of bears justifi=
> es their unprofessional relocation of common fruit pests like raccoons and =
> squirrels.=C2=A0 There is no relevance at all as far as=C2=A0moving pest an=
> imals to new sites.=C2=A0 </div>
> 
> <div>=C2=A0</div>
> <div>I have about an acre of bearing fruit trees on my property of 3 acres.=
> =C2=A0 I have had seasons where I&#39;ve trapped as many as 30 raccoons whi=
> ch is simply an obscene quantity from any ecological viewpoint.=C2=A0 These=
>  animals are like outdoor rats (however beautiful you may find them) that t=
> hrive in the presence of humans.=C2=A0 Pet food and garbage have increased =
> their numbers and human elimination of their predators has made any natural=
>  balancing impossible- short of an occasional rabbi outbreak or other disea=
> se.</div>
> 
> <div>=C2=A0</div>
> <div>What is the justification for the relocation of such an animal other t=
> han to spare someone the discomfort of having to kill it?=C2=A0 I often won=
> der how this raccoon population must affect songbirds and other wildlife.=
> =C2=A0 Raccoons are well known bird nest raiders.</div>
> 
> <div>=C2=A0</div>
> <div>Speaking of birds, squirrels benefit from what I consider to be the ig=
> norant feeding of birds.=C2=A0 Feeders deliver the majority of grain to rod=
> ents beneath them even if they are=C2=A0designed to deny rodents access.=C2=
> =A0 The birds themselves knock most of the grain off while feeding.=C2=A0 I=
>  often see well developed rat tunnels beneath bird feeders.=C2=A0 In the we=
> st there will also be ground squirrel tunnels.=C2=A0 Red and Grey squirrels=
>  will swarm to bird feeding sites in winter when conditions would otherwise=
>  bring their populations down (naturally).</div>
> 
> <div>=C2=A0</div>
> <div>It&#39;s interesting that the managers of these feeders (homeowners) a=
> re probably demographically heavily slanted to putting a high priority on e=
> nvironmental issues.=C2=A0 I believe that it is far superior for homeowners=
>  to create a landscape that feeds birds in a more natural manner by establi=
> shing plantings that nourish their birds.</div>
> 
> <div>=C2=A0</div>
> <div>I have a very difficult time controlling squirrels and protecting frui=
> t on sites where the homeowner maintains a bird feeder and in neighborhoods=
>  where such feeders are common.=C2=A0 </div>
> <div>=C2=A0</div>
> <div>The point I&#39;m making is that species whose populations are explodi=
> ng due to human intervention have no place to be relocated because adequate=
>  or excessive populations of the animals already exist most anywhere you ca=
> n take them.=C2=A0 Only a wildlife expert would be aware=C2=A0if a=C2=A0giv=
> en location would benefit from the addition of any given animal.=C2=A0</div=
> >
> 
> <div>=C2=A0</div>
> <div>=C2=A0</div>
> <div>=C2=A0</div>
> 
> --00151747afcc5aad750472d34bf6--
> 



-- 






More information about the nafex mailing list