[NAFEX] Honeyberry sweetness (sourness)

Lon J. Rombough lonrom at hevanet.com
Sat Jun 13 11:57:53 EDT 2009


Edible honeysuckle is mostly high in acid, which is why the ones you 
have taste sour as a fresh fruit.  Their sugar levels can actually be 
fairly high, with 17 Brix not being too unusual.
For clarification,   material being sold as Honeyberry is from Russian 
material.
I just spent a day with Dr. Maxine Thompson the breeder who is using 
Japanese material to produce new edible honeysuckle selections.  She 
calls the berries "Haskap" after the traditional Japanese name.  She 
has selections that bloom as much as two months later than the Russian 
stuff, have berries more than twice the size, and some selections are 
low in acid, so that they taste sweet when eaten fresh.  Helping her 
pick and evaluate new selections is a real education in these new 
fruits.
	If you have the "honeyberry" type try making a pie  with them.  Use a 
standard blueberry pie recipe and eat the pie while it's still warm.  
If you can't taste at least five different fruit flavors, your taste 
buds are dead.  And when Dr. Thompson's selections come on the market, 
those old ones will be plain by comparison.
-Lon Rombough

NEW grape pruning video: http://www.bunchgrapes.com/dvd.html View a 
short, low resolution clip here: 
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8Q58zFY0B1M
Grapes, writing, consulting, my book, The Grape Grower, at 
http://www.bunchgrapes.com  Winner of the Garden Writers Association 
"Best Talent in Writing" award for 2003.
A video about The Grape Grower : 
http://cookingupastory.com/index.php/2008/04/18/the-grape-grower/
On Jun 13, 2009, at 8:37 AM, Jim Fruth wrote:

     I have read posts where folks say that if our honeyberries are sour 
that
we are picking them too soon and they sweeten with time.  I tried that. 
  If
I don't pick them when they are sour, they fall off and they are still 
sour.
     To answer the sand vs. clay argument, my honeyberries are growing in
sandy loam, 5% organic matter - 95% sand.
     Plant pathologists claim that sour fruit indicates a copper 
deficiency.
My soil is not copper deficient but is it possible that honeyberries 
need
more than most plants?
     Are your honeyberries sour or sweet and do you know why?

Jim Fruth
Brambleberry Farm
Pequot Lakes, MN  56472
For jams, jellies, syrups and more:
www.jellygal.com
1-877-265-6856 (Toll Free)
1-218-831-7018 (My Cell)

_______________________________________________
nafex mailing list
nafex at lists.ibiblio.org

Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
This includes distribution on other email lists or reproduction on web 
sites.
Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim you have 
permission!

**YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are discarded.
No exceptions.
----
To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be 
used to change other email options):
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex

File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
Please do not send binary files.
Use plain text ONLY in emails!

NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/

-------------- next part --------------
A non-text attachment was scrubbed...
Name: not available
Type: text/enriched
Size: 3310 bytes
Desc: not available
Url : http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20090613/2e56daf5/attachment.bin 


More information about the nafex mailing list