[NAFEX] nafex Digest, Vol 71, Issue 20

Webmail wynne wynne at crcwnet.com
Sun Dec 7 16:14:27 EST 2008


about the mark rootstock...
we have older trees (15yrs old or so) on mark rootstock  they are very
consistant
producers and i am not sure if the production is dependent upon the
rootstock or the cultivar
seems the rootstock would determine more but some cultivars are
extremely biannual (spelling?)  on the same rootstock as the trees
next to them that produce heavily every year   Alan, someone  ????
wynne @jerzyboyz farm in nc washington

On 12/7/08, nafex-request at lists.ibiblio.org
<nafex-request at lists.ibiblio.org> wrote:
> Send nafex mailing list submissions to
> 	nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
> 	http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
> 	nafex-request at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
> 	nafex-owner at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of nafex digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>    1. Re: Apple pressing (Mark Angermayer)
>    2. Re: Apple pressing (Mark Angermayer)
>    3. apple rootstocks (Alan Haigh)
>    4. Re: apple rootstocks (Richard J.Ossolinski)
>    5. Regarding Haskups (Glenn & Kathy Russell)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2008 10:55:39 -0600
> From: "Mark Angermayer" <hangermayer at isp.com>
> Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Apple pressing
> To: "North American Fruit Explorers" <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <004301c9588c$a4971400$ba81f404 at computer5>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Del wrote:
>
> "I have a large acme screw and a 14" dia. thick wall plastic pipe I salvaged
> that I am thinking of making into a screw press for smaller batches, or for
> grapes. Figure I'll just drill a jillion holes in the pipe."
>
>
> Hi Del,
>
> I've been considering a screw type press as well.  Roton sell the screws.
> The problem is so much mechanical advantage is lost in the inefficiency of a
> screw.  Acme threads rate at about 30% efficiency.  And that's assuming a
> good thrust bearing.  Without a thrust bearing on the end of the screw, more
> mechanical advantage will be lost.  Hydraulic rams are nearly 100%
> efficient.  I'm still considering a screw, but I'm just not sure if it will
> deliver enough power.  In short, a typical acme 1 1/4" screw will only
> deliver about 4 ton of force, and that's with a thrust bearing, if 100
> ft/lbs. of torque is applied to the screw.
>
> Mark
> KS
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20081207/40c8275e/attachment-0001.htm
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2008 11:00:46 -0600
> From: "Mark Angermayer" <hangermayer at isp.com>
> Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Apple pressing
> To: "North American Fruit Explorers" <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <004901c9588d$5b11dc60$ba81f404 at computer5>
> Content-Type: text/plain;	charset="iso-8859-1"
>
> Claude wrote:
>
> "An important point you have to consider is how long a path the juice has to
> follow in order to escape the pomace. Pressure will often compress the
> pomace, making it impermeable, thus making it harder for the juice trapped
> in the center to escape. The best yield would be obtained from very thin
> layers where the path for the juice is very short... Also, too much
> pressure often expells pomace through the holes of the net, making a mess."
>
>
> Thanks Claude,
>
> Good advice.  I guess there are just some things in life, you can't hurry
> too much.
>
> Mark
> KS
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2008 11:57:31 -0500
> From: "Alan Haigh" <alandhaigh at gmail.com>
> Subject: [NAFEX] apple rootstocks
> To: nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> Message-ID: <1f544d60812070857w8d9ee76i481b702abdd0f81 at mail.gmail.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="utf-8"
>
> Ginda, anchorage refers to stability against wind- resistance to blowover.
> Trees on fully dwarfing rootstocks generally must be attached to a stake or
> trellis.  From M26 up trees can often be grown without support but
> sometimes while young are also susceptible to being blown over- particular
> when soils are saturated and the wind strong.
>
> As far as rootstock affecting fruit size and yeald , M7 gets the thumbs down
> on this score-  111 gets much better revues.  Although I have a lot of
> experience with both rootstocks the relative quality and quantity of the
> fruit in a home orchard situation doesn't seem that important.  With proper
> pruning and thinning both perform well enough but 111 sometimes takes about
> an extra year to bear.
>
> On at least 2 occasions I have read catalogues of small fruit tree
> nurseries- Ames and Apples of Antiquity, that state a preference for trees
> on 111 over 7.  These nurseries are on opposite sides of the country and
> grow trees in much different conditions.
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20081207/0013c490/attachment-0001.htm
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 4
> Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2008 12:18:08 -0500
> From: Richard J.Ossolinski <ossoeo at verizon.net>
> Subject: Re: [NAFEX] apple rootstocks
> To: North American Fruit Explorers <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <a2271a29df1ce57cd2867598e673af50 at verizon.net>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>
> Alan,
> Thanks for your input regarding fruit size on M111.  Anyone else?
> Richard
> Gouldsboro, ME Zone 5 (5-6" fresh snow and still coming down)
> On Dec 7, 2008, at 11:57 AM, Alan Haigh wrote:
>
>> As far as rootstock affecting fruit size and yeald , M7 gets the
>> thumbs down on this score-? 111 gets much better revues.? Although I
>> have a lot of experience with both rootstocks the relative?quality and
>> quantity of the fruit in a home orchard situation doesn't seem that
>> important.? With proper pruning and thinning both perform well enough
>> but 111 sometimes takes about an extra year to bear.
>> ?
>> On at least 2 occasions I have read catalogues of small fruit tree
>> nurseries- Ames and Apples of Antiquity, that state a preference?for
>> trees on 111 over 7.? These nurseries are on opposite sides of the
>> country and grow trees in much different
>> conditions.?_______________________________________________
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 5
> Date: Sun, 7 Dec 2008 12:39:08 -0500
> From: "Glenn & Kathy Russell" <GlennAndKathy2 at cox.net>
> Subject: [NAFEX] Regarding Haskups
> To: <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <819408DB12334D26823453F9C9984003 at GlennWork>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Hi John-
>
>             Thanks for the info!
>
>             Although I've purchased from probably 6, and have catalogs from
> 12 online fruit nurseries, I've actually done much with "One Green World".
> They certainly do have a lot more Honeyberries (11!) than say Raintree
> (None), Gurneys (2), or Burnt Ridge.  I've ordered a catalog from them now.
>
>             I think I'll probably go with your advice (seems to make sense,
> and you're close to me) about going with the late bloomers.  I'll probably
> just get 1 of each of the 4 you mention.  From their online blurb (below),
> it didn't seem to conflict with your advice.  It just seemed they were
> recommending those varieties for that area, but there's nothing to say they
> couldn't also work well in our area too.
>
>             Looking forward to having something else to eat at strawberry
> time!
>
> Thanks again for the info!
>
>                         -Glenn
>
>
>
> >From One Green World:  While Honeyberry can be grown throughout the US,
> some
> varieties have proven better adapted to our maritime Northwest growing
> conditions. The late blooming varieties Blue VelvetT, Blue MoonT, Blue
> ForestT, and Blue PacificT set and ripen significantly more fruit in our
> region. The other varieties grow well but bloom earlier, after our short and
> mild winters, and generally set less fruit because of the lack of bees and
> other insects available for pollination.
>
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20081207/06ef5b2b/attachment-0001.htm
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
> This includes distribution on other email lists or reproduction on web
> sites.
> Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim you have
> permission!
>
> **YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
> Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are discarded.
> No exceptions.
> ----
> To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be used
> to change other email options):
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>
> File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
> TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
> Please do not send binary files.
> Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>
> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
>
>
> End of nafex Digest, Vol 71, Issue 20
> *************************************
>



More information about the nafex mailing list