[NAFEX] nafex Digest, Vol 58, Issue 32

Alan Haigh alandhaigh at gmail.com
Wed Nov 21 16:23:32 EST 2007


Weird, it happened  to my carrots also, in a light forest loam, high in OM,
well mulched with straw.  I thought it was because a woodchuck mowed them in
middle growing season.  Many of the carrots were still useful though,
straight until the very end where they'd splay out fantastically.

On Nov 21, 2007 2:18 PM, <nafex-request at lists.ibiblio.org> wrote:

> Send nafex mailing list submissions to
>        nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
>        http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
>        nafex-request at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> You can reach the person managing the list at
>        nafex-owner at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
> than "Re: Contents of nafex digest..."
>
>
> Today's Topics:
>
>   1. Re: Trellising blackberries on steriods (Lon J. Rombough)
>   2. Re: OT Parsnips? (hans brinkmann)
>   3. OT parsnips (Karen Tillou)
>
>
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> Message: 1
> Date: Wed, 21 Nov 2007 10:04:42 -0800
> From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom at hevanet.com>
> Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Trellising blackberries on steriods
> To: North American Fruit Explorers <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <0828e86c7fd6b00679b7d120042261fb at hevanet.com>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> Dr. Albert Heinrich used a system of double trellises.  He planted the
> berries between two trellises and alternated them.  That is, if you
> looked down the row, the bearing canes were trained to one side and the
> new shoots were trained to the other side as they came along.  When the
> bearing canes were done, he just cut them off at the base and pulled
> the whole mass off that trellis, which then became the open trellis for
> the next batch of new shoots.
> -Lon Rombough
> Grapes, writing, consulting, my book, The Grape Grower, at
> http://www.bunchgrapes.com  Winner of the Garden Writers Association
> "Best Talent in Writing" award for 2003.
> For even more grape lessons, go to  http://www.grapeschool.com
> For all other things grape,   http://www.vitisearch.com
>
> On Nov 21, 2007, at 9:19 AM, Mark & Helen Angermayer wrote:
>
> Thanks Don,
>
> Evidently my trellis is a bit short.  I have a 5' trellis with wires at
> 2',
> 3', 4' and the top at 5'.  I also may have my plants too close, spaced
> at 3'
> apart.  This summer I cut the canes at the top of the trellis (5').
> They
> did spread laterally, but it seems most of the growth was at the top.
> My
> question is, how many canes would you recommend I leave on each wire for
> good quality fruit?  Also is it too late to start cutting out some of
> this
> summers canes if there are too many, or have the fruit buds already
> formed
> and the damage done?  This is the first year for these Triple Crown and
> they're so vigorous.
>
> Mark
> KS
>
> ----- Original Message -----
> From: "Don Yellman" <don.yellman at webformation.com>
> To: "North American Fruit Explorers" <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Sent: Wednesday, November 21, 2007 12:55 AM
> Subject: [NAFEX] Trellising Triple Crown
>
>
> > Mark:
> >
> > The solution to your cane crowding problems may be some fundamental
> changes in your cultural practices with this cultivar, particularly with
> respect to pruning.   The fact that this very vigorous blackberry grows
> fast, with a lot of long canes, does not mean you should leave them all.
> Plants should be spaced at a minimum distance of 4 feet apart under the
> trellis, and 6 feet is better.  The trellis should be at least 6 feet
> tall,
> and preferably a little taller.  Only three horizontal wires stretched
> across the trellis, spaced at roughly 18 inches apart are needed.  You
> can
> get by with two.  The top wire should be very close to the top bar of
> the
> trellis.  Individual primocanes coming up from below should be tied to
> the
> horizontal wires in a rough fan shape, and the main canes pinched back
> when
> they reach the top.  This will lead to formation of lateral canes which
> are
> also tied to the wires, and allowed to grow up to a length of 2-4 feet,
> depending on the degree of crowding
> > .  The objective is to expose all the fruiting laterals to sunlight,
> > which
> they will need when the time comes to produce blackberries the following
> season.  Bundles of canes tied together will produce few berries of
> lower
> quality than fewer canes properly spaced.
> >
> > As you have observed, tying all the canes together, whether at the top
> > of
> the trellis or at any other point will result in a jumbled mess of
> canes and
> will not favor the production of blackberries.  If you can't spread
> them out
> on your trellis so that each cane is exposed to light, cut some of them
> out
> entirely.  Next July, when you begin picking blackberries, new
> primocanes
> will already be halfway up or more up the trellis.  Floricanes may be
> removed anytime after the last berry has been picked, which is not a
> difficult task if the trellis is not overcrowded.  Then you begin the
> pinching, pruning and training cycle over again with the new primocanes.
> >
> > Don Yellman, Great Falls, VA
> > _______________________________________________
> > nafex mailing list
> > nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> >
> > Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
> > This includes distribution on other email lists or reproduction on web
> sites.
> > Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim you have
> permission!
> >
> > **YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
> > Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are discarded.
> > No exceptions.
> > ----
> > To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be
> used to change other email options):
> > http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> >
> > File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
> > TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
> > Please do not send binary files.
> > Use plain text ONLY in emails!
> >
> > NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
> >
> >
> >
> > --
> > No virus found in this incoming message.
> > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
> > Version: 7.5.486 / Virus Database: 269.16.1/1141 - Release Date:
> > 11/20/07
> 11:34 AM
> >
> >
>
> _______________________________________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
> This includes distribution on other email lists or reproduction on web
> sites.
> Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim you have
> permission!
>
> **YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
> Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are discarded.
> No exceptions.
> ----
> To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be
> used to change other email options):
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>
> File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
> TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
> Please do not send binary files.
> Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>
> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
>
> -------------- next part --------------
> A non-text attachment was scrubbed...
> Name: not available
> Type: text/enriched
> Size: 5664 bytes
> Desc: not available
> Url :
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20071121/111a8955/attachment-0001.bin
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 2
> Date: Wed, 21 Nov 2007 19:30:36 +0100
> From: hans brinkmann <hans-brinkmann at t-online.de>
> Subject: Re: [NAFEX] OT Parsnips?
> To: North American Fruit Explorers <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID: <4744794C.3000109 at t-online.de>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1; format=flowed
>
>
>
>
> Hallo Naomi,
>
> your very nice description made me really laughing!
> Because of the big crowns you expected probably super giant parsnip -
> to feed all neighbors...
> Like Bill (and me) experienced:
> Usually the (poor) soilstructure is responsible for many roots.
>
> ciao
> hans
>
>
>
> Naomi schrieb:
>
> >I am just digging up my first parsnip crop.  It looks more like science
> >fiction than it does like a store parsnip.  There is a very broad (8 or 9
> >inch) crown which is maybe 5 inches deep and then disintegrates into a
> >twisted mass of roots suitable for late night TV SciFi movies.  What
> >happened?
> >Naomi
> >
> >_______________________________________________
> >nafex mailing list
> >nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
> >
> >Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
> >This includes distribution on other email lists or reproduction on web
> sites.
> >Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim you have
> permission!
> >
> >**YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
> >Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are discarded.
> >No exceptions.
> >----
> >To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be
> used to change other email options):
> >http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
> >
> >File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
> >TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
> >Please do not send binary files.
> >Use plain text ONLY in emails!
> >
> >NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
> >
> >
> >
>
>
>
> ------------------------------
>
> Message: 3
> Date: Wed, 21 Nov 2007 11:18:02 -0800
> From: Karen Tillou <arboretum at homeorchardsociety.org>
> Subject: [NAFEX] OT parsnips
> To: North American Fruit Explorers <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
> Message-ID:
>        <ABBF323D-F82E-4CB7-9C86-6818275E23D1 at homeorchardsociety.org>
> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>
> that's been my experience too - commercial root crops, esp. long ones
> like parsnips and carrots, are generally grown in VERY sandy soils,
> where the roots stay perfect shape, and heavy amounts of water and
> fertilizers need to be added, as the sand doesn't hold on to
> nutrients the way heavier, clay soils do.  try doing some double
> digging, using a broadfork to break the soils up deep down next
> spring, and adding lots of organic matter (every year...) to get and
> keep your soils light enough to grow less-alien roots. the deeper and
> fluffier you can get your soil, the better you'll do.  don't hurt
> your back.
>
> karen tillou
> oregon city, OR - zone 8a and wet
>
> On Nov 21, 2007, at 8:20 AM, William C. Garthright wrote:
>
> I am just digging up my first parsnip crop.  It looks more like
> science fiction than it does like a store parsnip.  There is a very
> broad (8 or 9 inch) crown which is maybe 5 inches deep and then
> disintegrates into a twisted mass of roots suitable for late night TV
> SciFi movies.  What happened?
>
>
>
> Um,... aliens?  :-)
>
> Sorry, I couldn't resist. I don't know, but I planted carrots this year
> (carrots! what was I thinking?) that ended up that way. But this was in
> heavy clay soil that hadn't been worked before, and it turned into a
> brick in our hot, dry summer. How is your soil there? If it's too hard,
> the root might have trouble forming a nice round shape, and just expand
> where it finds cracks and crevices.
>
> Just an idea. I've never grown parsnips myself.
>
> Bill
>
> --
> In science, 'fact' can only mean 'confirmed to such a degree that it
> would be perverse to withhold provisional assent.' I suppose that apples
> might start to rise tomorrow, but the possibility does not merit equal
> time in physics classrooms. - Stephen Jay Gould
> _______________________________________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
> This includes distribution on other email lists or reproduction on
> web sites.
> Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim you have
> permission!
>
> **YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
> Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are discarded.
> No exceptions.
> ----
> To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can
> be used to change other email options):
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>
> File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
> TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
> Please do not send binary files.
> Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>
> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
>
> -------------- next part --------------
> An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
> URL:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20071121/2cbc03fe/attachment.htm
>
> ------------------------------
>
> _______________________________________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> Reproduction of list messages or archives is not allowed.
> This includes distribution on other email lists or reproduction on web
> sites.
> Permission to reproduce is NEVER granted, so don't claim you have
> permission!
>
> **YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
> Posts from email addresses that are not subscribed are discarded.
> No exceptions.
> ----
> To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be
> used to change other email options):
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>
> File attachments are NOT stripped by this list.
> TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
> Please do not send binary files.
> Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>
> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
>
>
> End of nafex Digest, Vol 58, Issue 32
> *************************************
>
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20071121/252f72cb/attachment.html 


More information about the nafex mailing list