[NAFEX] Malus fusca?

Thomas Olenio tolenio at sentex.net
Sun Apr 10 09:17:45 EDT 2005


Hello,

Can this water tolerant apple (Malus fusca) be useful as grafting roostock  
in wet areas?  Does it produce a standard tree, or have dwarfing  
properties.

I have read that the fruit was so acid, settlers just put it in water for  
winter storge.  Would this quality effect the taste of a grafted apple  
scion?

Thanks,
Tom


On Sat, 9 Apr 2005 19:50:38 -0700, Lon J. Rombough <lonrom at hevanet.com>  
wrote:

> Malus fusca is a species of apple native to the Pacific NW.  It has two
> traits useful for your purposes. One is that it's the most resistant to
> fireblight of all apples.  The other is that it grows along
> streambanks, even into the water somewhat, so it can take wet soil
> easily.  The fruit is too tiny to be much good, but  the species would
> give you a way to grow apples on your soggy site.  Sadly, Pierre
> Rotschky, who had more experience with this species than anyone I know,
> passed away last October.
> -Lon Rombough
> Grapes, writing, consulting, my book, The Grape Grower, at
> http://www.bunchgrapes.com  Winner of the Garden Writers Association
> "Best Talent in Writing" award for 2003.
> On Apr 9, 2005, at 7:43 PM, Richard Moyer wrote:
>
> Deb wrote:
> I have a place along a drainage ditch that I would like to plant a
> fruiting hedge.  Our soil is heavy clay.  The front lip of the ditch
> does drain, but it is still a wet area.  Are there any fruiting hedges
> that would do well in a location like this?  I am in SE Ohio.
>
> Deb,
> We have a clay area at our place that floods during heavy rains, and
> Amelanchier canadensis (Juneberry) is doing well there. Got ours from
> Lawyer's Nursery.  Have seen Juneberry growing in soggy places along
> mountain streams and bogs near here.  The form we have is multistemmed
> and tops out at 8-10 feet, but could be pruned shorter.  Outstanding
> multiseason interest; ours in full bloom now.
> Another to try is pawpaw, which also is seasonally flooded in some
> habitat here.
> Consider too the native swamp rose, which has decent flavored hips.
> Agreed with previous post that elderberry a good choice.
> Richard Moyer
> East Tenn, Zone 6



-- 
============


-- 
Internal Virus Database is out-of-date.
Checked by AVG Anti-Virus.
Version: 7.0.300 / Virus Database: 266.8.0 - Release Date: 03/21/2005




More information about the nafex mailing list