[NAFEX] Apple Identification

Luffman, Margie luffmanm at AGR.GC.CA
Fri Oct 22 12:11:41 EDT 2004


Neighbours who have lived in the area for more than 80 years say that the tree has been there at least all of their lives, so we can speculate its planting date to be ca. 1924. This does bring the date closer to Battleford's introduction.

Margie



Margie Luffman 
Curator/Conservatrice
Canadian Clonal Genebank/Banque canadienne de Clones
Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada/Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada
Telephone/Téléphone: 519-738-2251 ext. 474
Facsimile/Télécopieur: 519-738-2929
2585 County Road 20
Harrow, Ontario 
N0R 1G0 
luffmanm at agr.gc.ca
 
 Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada - Agriculture et Agroalimentaire Canada

-----Original Message-----
From: nafex-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org [mailto:nafex-bounces at lists.ibiblio.org] On Behalf Of loneroc
Sent: October 20, 2004 7:22 AM
To: North American Fruit Explorers
Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Apple Identification

Why couldn't the apple have been planted later than the house was built.  Is
there evidence that they originated at the same time?

Steve Herje,  lone rock, WI
----- Original Message ----- 
From: "Dean Kreutzer" <deankreutzer at hotmail.com>
To: <nafex at lists.ibiblio.org>
Sent: Tuesday, October 19, 2004 10:59 AM
Subject: Re: [NAFEX] Apple Identification


> >Since Battleford was introduced about 1930 and this tree was planted in
> >about 1910, I doubt it could be Battleford.  Also the apple is very
sweet.
> >Battleford is so tart in my opinion a person can arely even finish one
> >apple.  Usually after one bite a person doesn't take another with
> >Battleford.  pples of that size were extremely rare on the prairies,
> >especially at that time.
>
> Your right Bernie, 1910 is too early for Battleford, but my experience
with
> Battleford is that if eaten perfectly ripe, before going soft it is a good
> eating apple, not that tart.  Of course, taste is relative isn't it?
>
> I know from my discussions with the breeders at the U of S and the U of
> Minn, open pollinated seeds are tossed as garbage because 99% of the time,
> they seedlings usually are.  As you say, apples of that size were
extremely
> rare, and in 1910 there was pretty much only the Siberian Crab which was
> completely hardy.  This is why I have my doubts that it was a complete
> hardy, OP seedling of an apple such as McIntosh.  Apple breeding began at
> the U of S in the 1920's, so I'd wager that it is something that came out
of
> that early work.  It's only a guess however.
>
> It would be very interesting to get a sample of leaf and fruit to try to
> discover it's identity.
>
> Dean Kreutzer
> Regina, Saskatchewan Canada
> USDA zone 3
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> nafex mailing list
> nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
> **YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
> All other messages are discarded.
> No exceptions.
> ----
> To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be
used to change other email options):
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>
> File attachments are NOT stripped by this list
> TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
> Please do not send binary files.
> Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>
> Message archives are here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex
>
> NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/
>

_______________________________________________
nafex mailing list 
nafex at lists.ibiblio.org

**YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
All other messages are discarded.
No exceptions.  
----
To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be used to change other email options):
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex

File attachments are NOT stripped by this list
TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
Please do not send binary files.
Use plain text ONLY in emails!

Message archives are here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex

NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/



More information about the nafex mailing list