[NAFEX] Rubus parviflorus

Dan Sorensen dan at phantomlake.net
Sun Aug 22 22:37:18 EDT 2004


Mark,

I grow a very similar species, Rubus odoratus, which is native as far south 
as Georgia and is almost identical in appearance except that the flowers 
are pink instead of white.  You may be able to find it growing wild in your 
area.  In my opinion it is a nice ornamental and does produce berries that 
are very richly flavored.  The complaint I have often seen about the 
berries is that they are dry, but in my experience that is not true.  I 
believe they get that reputation because there is a fine fuzzy coating on 
the berries that makes them seem dry.  On the other hand, they don't have 
as much juice as regular raspberries and are a bit seedy, but the flavor 
makes them worth eating to me.  They are adapted to shady locations, but as 
a result they don't produce heavy crops in those conditions.  But they will 
grow in our Pennsylvania direct sun with no problems and do produce a bit 
better for me that way.

Some of their other advantages seem to be that they are not as invasive as 
other Rubus species, they have no thorns,  and the flowers are fairly large 
and showy, regularly eliciting admiring remarks from visitors to my 
garden.  They also seem to be resistant or immune to most of the diseases 
that affect other Rubus species.

Dan Sorensen


At 10:12 PM 8/22/2004 -0400, you wrote:

>    In mid July I spent some time in the Boundry Water Canoe Area in Northern
>Minnisota. One of the plants that stood out was Thimbleberry, Rubus
>parviflorus. What a lush plant with foliage that has a tropical feel. The
>leaves are huge with terminal clusters of large white flowers. The berries
>where much larger than most rasberries. None where ripe. I was wondering if
>anyone has had any experience with this Rubus.  Even if the berries arent
>much count I would love to grow this for the follaige. It would look great
>in the garden.  One appealing aspect is that seems to be able to tolerate
>some  shade. I kind of think coming from the North Woods that it might not
>survive our hot and sweatie summers of the midwest.
>Any thoughts on this species.
>
>Mark    southern ohio
>
>_______________________________________________
>nafex mailing list
>nafex at lists.ibiblio.org
>
>**YOU MUST BE SUBSCRIBED TO POST!**
>All other messages are discarded.
>No exceptions.
>----
>To subscribe or unsubscribe, go to the bottom of this page (also can be 
>used to change other email options):
>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/nafex
>
>File attachments are NOT stripped by this list
>TAKE STEPS TO PROTECT YOURSELF FROM COMPUTER VIRUSES!
>Please do not send binary files.
>Use plain text ONLY in emails!
>
>Message archives are here:
>http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/nafex
>
>NAFEX web site:   http://www.nafex.org/

______________________________________________________________________
Dan Sorensen                               Visit my Experimental Gardening 
Website at:
RD2 Box 57                                     http://www.phantomlake.net
Russell, PA 16345                          Northwestern Pennsylvania  USDA 
Zone 5
dan at phantomlake.net              Penn State Master Gardener & Ham Radio- WB8VEF
______________________________________________________________________ 
-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20040822/bb7da38d/attachment.html 


More information about the nafex mailing list