[NAFEX] pollinating with P nigra

Dean Kreutzer deankreutzer at hotmail.com
Sun Aug 22 15:30:13 EDT 2004


>Which P. Nigra?  From where?  Any from anywhere?  Isn't that a little 
>general?  I'd trust a specific strain from a specific location - to try.

I believe what Rick Sawatsky was talking about was using wild or "pure" p. 
nigra.  The ironic thing is that nowadays there are very little pure sources 
left, rootstocks of supposed p. nigra are a couple of generations away from 
the pure p. nigra.  The moral of the story is the more pure the source of p. 
nigra, the better chance it will have of successfully pollinizing p. nigra 
or p. americana hybrids.  I would have to ask, but I assume that pollen from 
pure p. americana would be a good source as well.

As mentioned in the article, hardy P. salicina hybrids from manchuria such 
as Ptitsen #3, or #5, Fofenhoff, Ivanovka are also good pollinizers.  I 
don't know if these selections are widely available in the US, however.

South Dakota is supposedly a Japanese x american (p. salicina x p. 
americana) hybrid, so based on the article, probably would not be a good 
pollinizer.  The Toka and it's sister Kahinta plums are p. americana x p. 
simonii hybrids I believe, which may be good pollinizers to the p. salicina 
hybrids.

Dean Kreutzer
Regina, Saskatchewan Canada
USDA zone 3

_________________________________________________________________
Powerful Parental Controls Let your child discover the best the Internet has 
to offer. 
http://join.msn.com/?pgmarket=en-ca&page=byoa/prem&xAPID=1994&DI=1034&SU=http://hotmail.com/enca&HL=Market_MSNIS_Taglines 
  Start enjoying all the benefits of MSN® Premium right now and get the 
first two months FREE*.




More information about the nafex mailing list