[nafex] Digest Number 969

Gordon Nofs gc_nofs at hotmail.com
Thu Jan 10 11:47:51 EST 2002


Pete
  I think that is the main problem with people saying pawpaws are hard to 
graft and take. I have lost very few. I have three mother trees that I have 
about 20 varieties on, so that if I do loose a tree or something all is not 
lost. I then work them on small seedlings of 12 to 18 inches mostly. My 
success rate must be over 90% and some of them the seedling dies or rabbits 
chew them off so I protect them now with tree pros. I use the same method I 
use on all fruit trees. Nuts some different.
    Gordon C. Nofs   Flint, MI   zone 5


----Original Message Follows----
From: "Pete Benfield" <pete at cmpsource.com>
Reply-To: nafex at yahoogroups.com
To: <nafex at yahoogroups.com>
Subject: Re: [nafex] Digest Number 969
Date: Thu, 10 Jan 2002 07:24:21 -0600

  Hi Lucky and Group
Thanks  for the info. Do you know where I can find additional info on these
types or species or families....(A.parviflora and
A.reticulata) ?  I have never heard of these before and thought pawpaws were
all the same (family?)
I guess the good ones are graftable onto these?  I hear it's difficult to
graft pawpaws. I have 2 seedlings of Arkansas seeds that I bought , so maybe
they will do something.
Thanks, Pete




----- Original Message -----
From: <nafex at yahoogroups.com>
To: <nafex at yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, January 09, 2002 9:49 PM
Subject: [nafex] Digest Number 969






------------------LIST GUIDELINES----------------------

1) Please sign your posting.  Include climate and location information if
relevent.
2) Attached files will be stripped from your messages.  Post attachments on
the www.YahooGroups.com website.
3) To unsubscribe send a BLANK message to
         nafex-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com
4) Include only pertinent comments/questions when replying to a posting and
NOT the entire message (especially if the initial posting was large).
------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are 13 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

       1. Re: Digest Number 968
            From: "Pete Benfield" <pete at cmpsource.com>
       2. 'Andirondack crab apple'
            From: "David Doud" <doudone at netusa1.net>
       3. Re: Kind of off topic; but sort of on/E-answers
            From: Suzi Teghtmeyer <srt175f at smsu.edu>
       4. H. R. Martin
            From: Lucky Pittman <Lucky.Pittman at murraystate.edu>
       5. sandwiching
            From: "edforest2010" <edforest55 at hotmail.com>
       6. Pawpaws
            From: Lucky Pittman <Lucky.Pittman at murraystate.edu>
       7. Re: sandwiching
            From: Thomas Olenio <tolenio at sentex.net>
       8. Re: Kind of off topic; but sort of on/E-answers
            From: "fuwafuwaosagi" <fuwafuwausagi at muchomail.com>
       9. grafting grape vines
            From: Joe Boles <jobo at istar.ca>
      10. Re: grafting grape vines
            From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom at hevanet.com>
      11. Re: sandwiching, Ultra Hardy Peaches
            From: Bernie Nikolai <Nikolai at v-wave.com>
      12. Re: grafting grape vines
            From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom at hevanet.com>
      13. Re: Re: Kind of off topic; but sort of on/E-answers
            From: mark wessel <growyourown at earthlink.net>


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 1
    Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2002 05:54:22 -0600
    From: "Pete Benfield" <pete at cmpsource.com>
Subject: Re: Digest Number 968

Hi Lucky and Group
My pawpaw comments.
I was raised in South MS in the woods. Myself and brothers ate anything we
could in the woods. Never saw a pawpaw because there were none.
About a year ago I found that there are pawpaws growing north of Gulfport,
MS in the clay hills there. (not big hills) This is about 60 miles east of
where we were raised. These pawpaws are on very small trees and are about
thumb sized to hen egg sized. I tried eating a few soft ones and they were
really some sorry mess. All seeds with a little bitter slime to go with
them.
I have a couple plants here in South La. to try....saw a little blackish
flower on one before the little tree croaked. Got a few seedlings from seeds
ordered from Arkansas.(and a few other seedlings I ordered)
I have not had any luck with pawpaws but am still trying. I have asked many
oldtimers from this area...(south La....50 miles N of New Orleans...z 8b and
rural) about pawpaws, and no one has ever heard of them.
Thanks
Pete Benfield 8b
----- Original Message -----
From: <nafex at yahoogroups.com>
To: <nafex at yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Wednesday, January 09, 2002 3:10 AM
Subject: [nafex] Digest Number 968






------------------LIST GUIDELINES----------------------

1) Please sign your posting.  Include climate and location information if
relevent.
2) Attached files will be stripped from your messages.  Post attachments on
the www.YahooGroups.com website.
3) To unsubscribe send a BLANK message to
         nafex-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com
4) Include only pertinent comments/questions when replying to a posting and
NOT the entire message (especially if the initial posting was large).
------------------------------------------------------------------------

There are 6 messages in this issue.

Topics in this digest:

       1. Re: cranberry crabapple?
            From: Lucky Pittman <Lucky.Pittman at murraystate.edu>
       2. Re: Pawpaw
            From: Lucky Pittman <Lucky.Pittman at murraystate.edu>
       3. Re: cranberry crabapple?
            From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom at hevanet.com>
       4. Pawpaw info
            From: nottke <nottke at ols.net>
       5. Re: NEW VIRUS ALERT
            From: "Gordon Nofs" <gc_nofs at hotmail.com>
       6. Obituary: H. R. Martin
            From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom at hevanet.com>


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 1
    Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 08:11:36 -0600
    From: Lucky Pittman <Lucky.Pittman at murraystate.edu>
Subject: Re: cranberry crabapple?

At 04:44 AM 01/08/2002 +0000, De. wrote:

 >Just heard from Bob Purvis and he sent me this request.....
 >
 >" Del, would you be willing to put out a request for the Cranberry
 >Crabapple?

It's probably not the same, but Garfield Schults sent me a piece of
"Cranberry Crunch" a couple of years back.  I've got a small tree of it
growing, but it hasn't fruited yet, so I don't know anything about it, and
I don't recall Garfield giving any details about it.
Lucky Pittman
USDA Zone 6
Hopkinsville, KY



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 2
    Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 08:26:19 -0600
    From: Lucky Pittman <Lucky.Pittman at murraystate.edu>
Subject: Re: Pawpaw

As a kid, roaming the woods & creeks of east-central Alabama, on the zone
7/8 interface, I never knowingly saw a pawpaw.  However, now that I know
what they are, I realize they were virtually everywhere throughout the
woods, along the little creeks, etc.
On my visits 'home', I still have yet to see an A.triloba with
fruit(they're present, I just never see any with fruit), but have seen a
couple of dwarf pawpaw, A.parviflora, on my parents' farm, one of
which(I've named it 'Trash Pile", due to it's location) is loaded with
fruit every year - they're all small, thumb-size, and mostly seed, but each
branch is festooned with numerous fruits, usually singles, distributed all
along their length.  I've never been there at the appropriate time of year
to sample a ripe fruit, so I can't comment on their flavor.  "Trash Pile"
is growing on top of a rocky red clay hill, in full sun, with no other
pawpaws within 100 yds, so it may(?) be self-fertile.  I've grafted it onto
A.triloba rootstock and have it growing here in KY, where it has survived
at least two zone 6 winters.
The local native A.triloba, here, have fruits which are usually, as Gordon
indicated, the size of one or two large to extra-large hen eggs, but there
are a few groves which routinely produce large fruits, the size of my fist,
or larger.  Can't say that I've been able to ascertain any appreciable
difference in fruit quality/taste between one pawpaw and another, though
I'm hoping some of my grafted selections and named-parentage seedlings will
prove that there IS a difference.
Lucky Pittman
USDA Zone 6
Hopkinsville, KY



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 3
    Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 08:54:39 -0800
    From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom at hevanet.com>
Subject: Re: cranberry crabapple?

"Cranberry Crunch" is one of Garfield Shults's own creations, not related to
Cranberry crab apple.  It's a "lunchbox" size fall apple, tart, but nicely
flavored.
-Lon Rombough
----------
 >From: Lucky Pittman <Lucky.Pittman at murraystate.edu>
 >To: nafex at yahoogroups.com
 >Subject: Re: [nafex] cranberry crabapple?
 >Date: Tue, Jan 8, 2002, 6:11 AM
 >

 >At 04:44 AM 01/08/2002 +0000, De. wrote:
 >
 >>Just heard from Bob Purvis and he sent me this request.....
 >>
 >>" Del, would you be willing to put out a request for the Cranberry
 >>Crabapple?
 >
 >It's probably not the same, but Garfield Schults sent me a piece of
 >"Cranberry Crunch" a couple of years back.  I've got a small tree of it
 >growing, but it hasn't fruited yet, so I don't know anything about it, and
 >I don't recall Garfield giving any details about it.
 >Lucky Pittman
 >USDA Zone 6
 >Hopkinsville, KY
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >------------------LIST GUIDELINES----------------------
 >
 >1) Please sign your posting.  Include climate and location information if
relevent.
 >2) Attached files will be stripped from your messages.  Post attachments 
on
 >the www.YahooGroups.com website.
 >3) To unsubscribe send a BLANK message to
 >        nafex-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com
 >4) Include only pertinent comments/questions when replying to a posting 
and
 >NOT the entire message (especially if the initial posting was large).
 >
 >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
 >
 >
 >


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 4
    Date: Tue, 8 Jan 2002 15:30:34 -0400
    From: nottke <nottke at ols.net>
Subject: Pawpaw info

Those of you interested in pawpaws that have not visited the KYSU web site
might want to look it over
http://www.pawpaw.kysu.edu/

Jim Nottke
Pfafftown, NC 27040
nottke at ols.net




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 5
    Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 16:59:30 -0500
    From: "Gordon Nofs" <gc_nofs at hotmail.com>
Subject: Re: NEW VIRUS ALERT

There now is a virus out there that you do not have to open an attachment.
If you open the e-mail to it you got it.
    Gordon====================================


----Original Message Follows----
From: Claude Jolicoeur <cjoli at gmc.ulaval.ca>
Reply-To: nafex at yahoogroups.com
To: nafex at yahoogroups.com
Subject: Re: [nafex] NEW VIRUS ALERT
Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 01:44:27 -0500

Lon and all others,
Actually, it is quite simple...
NEVER open ANY attachment unless you know the sender, and he mentions
explicitely something about the attachment in his message. Also, the text
in the message should make sense considering the person who sent the
message and the subject. Also, your name should be mentioned in the message
- virus are still too stupid to know your name.

File extensions may give you indications also. The most suspect extensions
are: .exe, .com, .bat, .lnk, .pif, .doc

In doubt, send a reply to the sender asking him if he sent you an
attachment. Just follow this simple rule, it is the best insurance against
virus - much easier in fact than hasseling with anti-virus software.

Oh, and if you send an attachment to someone, please do say so in your
message - like: "Dear Lon, here is a nice picture of an apple that grows in
my neighbour's yard..."

Claude

A 20:54 02.01.07 -0800, vous avez écrit :
  >Below is a copy of the text that came with two attachments that are 
almost
  >certainly VIRUS.  The text is written to sound like a business letter, 
but
  >if you notice, it doesn't really say anything.
  >I have a Mac, so I can't test the attachments, but one of
  >them is a .bat attachment and every .bat attachment I've seen has been
part
  >of a virus.  The other attachment is a .doc
  >DON'T OPEN ANYTHING THAT RESEMBLES THE
  >LETTER BELOW.





Gordon C. Nofs
Flint, Michigan
gc_nofs at hotmail.com


_________________________________________________________________
Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com/intl.asp.



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 6
    Date: Tue, 08 Jan 2002 19:48:20 -0800
    From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom at hevanet.com>
Subject: Obituary: H. R. Martin

I was very saddened to learn of the passing Monday, Jan. 7, of H. R. Martin
of Hopkinsville, KY.
      A retired Ag. inspector, H.R. took up fruit exploring and breeding in
earnest in his retirement and created some very interesting grape
varieties..
  Besides a cross of S. 9110 x Concord that he spoke highly of, he had some
Vitis aestivalis hybrid seedlings, several of which seemed very promising
when he sent me fruit samples this year.  Some were pure flavored, vinous,
with no off flavors, and one that was aestivalis x Muscat Hamburg was
excellent in flavor and had over 22 Brix, though the berries were small.
     Hopefully, his material can be saved, and at least one man in the area
said he would approach the family about it.
-Lon Rombough


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/






________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 2
    Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2002 10:59:36 -0500
    From: "David Doud" <doudone at netusa1.net>
Subject: 'Andirondack crab apple'

'Andirondack crabapple'  -  I have a person seeking trees of this - I am not
familiar with it - can anyone suggest a source?  thanks,  DOUD


[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 3
    Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 11:08:39 -0600
    From: Suzi Teghtmeyer <srt175f at smsu.edu>
Subject: Re: Kind of off topic; but sort of on/E-answers

Kevin (Fluffy) and other,
I recommend you go to the E-answers site at: http://128.227.242.197/

Click on: Search E-answers by region by keyword

for Florida: South  (this also works for the entire USA)

in the list: check the box for the University of Florida
in the box "Enter some key words to search by:" try cultivars
      *when I tried this I got 305 hits on fruit, vegetable, and ornamental
cultivars grown in Florida, including strawberries, blueberries,
persimmons, pears, low-chill apple cultivars, etc.  So many to chose from!

One document, "Deciduous Fruit for Central Florida", lists stone fruits,
pome fruits, persimmons, figs, blackberries, pecans, blueberries, and grape
cultivars, along with establishment and fertilization suggestions (the
document is more than 20 pages long with the tables of cultivars for each
fruit!)

At E-answers you can also search on a fruit by name; search as many
universities or even the entire region at once.

Additional links:
University of Florida Extension Publications: http://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/
Florida Strawberry Growers Association: http://www.straw-berry.org/

Let me know if I can help you find something in particular.
----Suzi Teghtmeyer
Librarian, Paul Evans Library of Fruit Science
Southwest Missouri State University Mtn. Grove Campus and Missouri Fruit
Experiment Station
9740 Red Spring Rd, Mountain Grove, MO 65711
Phone: 417-926-4105, Fax: 417-926-6646,  email: srt175f at smsu.edu
URL: http://library.smsu.edu/paulevans/pelIndex.htm
Member: CBHL, USAIN, ALA, ACRL, IAALD

At 04:25 PM 01/02/2002 +0000, lostman_amiga wrote:
 >I would say the first thing you need to do is join the
 >Southern Fruit Fellowship. :)
 >
 >Most of what you listed will grow in Georgia, but that seems to be the
limit.
 >You may wish to get a book on subtropical fruit for Florida.
 >
 >--- In nafex at y..., "fuwafuwaosagi" <fuwafuwausagi at m...> wrote:
 > > Gang:
 > >
 > > Well, the fluffy one is fast approaching that time in life where he
 > > decides where he is going to stake out his place in the sun.  The
 > > wife is leaning to Florida, but as we both greatly enjoy a variety of
 > > home grown fruit it poses a bit of a problem.  So here is the
 > > question what the heck can I grow in Florida?  I guess citrus is in,
 > > but what of strawberries, raspberries, blackberries, goose berries,
 > > currants, apples, pears, cherries, plums, grapes, normal garden
 > > crops, corn, apricots, peaches etc.  My instincts tell me most
 > > apples, all pears, all cherries, garden root crops except sweet
 > > potatoe, plums, all goose berries and currants are out but I simply
 > > do not know.   Most of my books are geared for zones 3-5.  Is anyone
 > > in Florida, and what are you growing?
 > >
 > > Wishing all of you the very best,
 > >
 > > Kevin(the fluffy bunny)Mathews



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 4
    Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 11:26:41 -0600
    From: Lucky Pittman <Lucky.Pittman at murraystate.edu>
Subject: H. R. Martin

At 07:48 PM 01/08/2002 -0800, Lon Rombough wrote:
 >I was very saddened to learn of the passing Monday, Jan. 7, of H. R. 
Martin
 >of Hopkinsville, KY.
 >      A retired Ag. inspector, H.R. took up fruit exploring and breeding 
in
 >earnest in his retirement and created some very interesting grape
varieties.
 >  Besides a cross of S. 9110 x Concord that he spoke highly of, he had 
some
 >Vitis aestivalis hybrid seedlings, several of which seemed very promising
 >when he sent me fruit samples this year.  Some were pure flavored, vinous,
 >with no off flavors, and one that was aestivalis x Muscat Hamburg was
 >excellent in flavor and had over 22 Brix, though the berries were small.

A personal note on Harold Martin, whom I'd known for only 2-3 years prior
to his death.
He was born in Christian Co., KY where he received his primary education in
a one-room school house.  After obtaining a B.S. and M.S. in Agriculture
from the University of Kentucky, he embarked on a long career as an
agriculture inspector for the US border service in the Laredo, TX area,
with a shorter stint at Kennedy Airport in NY.
When he retired and move back home to Hopkinsville, he purchased the home
of Hopkinsville's most famous citizen, noted clairvoyant/mystic Edgar
Cayce, where he lived until his death.  He put his command of the Spanish
language to use by befriending and interceding for members of the Hispanic
community and the population of seasonal Hispanic migrant workers who labor
here in the cultivation of tobacco.
Every time I had a chance to visit with him, or speak with him on the
phone, he had some new plant variety or discovery that he wanted me to
try.  Virtually every inch of his small yard was utilized in his plant
breeding experiments - in addition to grapes, he worked with species as
diverse as garlic, chives, walnuts, pears, trifoliate orange, daylilies,
peaches, jostaberries, cherries - and probably many others I was not even
aware of.
He was involved, behind the scenes, in helping to beautify portions of
downtown Hopkinsville with some of his plantings - he was "ahead of the
curve" in some respects, planting care-free edible species such as Cornus
mas, Amelanchier laevis, and disease-resistant crabs from his own breeding
projects, in public areas, long before these species caught the eye and
fancy of the nursery/landscaping trade.


Louis L. "Lucky" Pittman, Jr., DVM
Veterinary Pathologist/Asst. Prof.
Murray St. Univ.-Breathitt Veterinary Ctr.
Hopkinsville, KY



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 5
    Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 18:25:08 -0000
    From: "edforest2010" <edforest55 at hotmail.com>
Subject: sandwiching

I finally found the Pomona issue and the article on sandwiching, it
was written by Bernie Nikolai.
He said that it was in BC, Canada that a felllow, Percyy Wright,
grafted some super hardy plums onto some peaches (so it wasn't in
Alaska as I'd thought), then a test winter killed all the peaches that
weren't grafted to the plums.
Percy thought that the plums caused the peaches to go dormant earlier
in the fall. (I wonder why he didn't theorize that it caused them to
leaf out later in the spring though, or at least why he ruled that
out)
Bernie goes on to say that he used the above info to try what I
believe he termed originally "sandwiching", or grafting a tender
variety onto a hardy frame and later grafting the tender variety to a
hardy branch tip, leaving the tender variety "sancwiched" between two
hardy stocks. He suggests that this might give a tender variety an
added protection against frost, beyond simply topworking.
So Bernie, have you had any success with this method?
The article was in issue XXV, Fall of '94, editor Bob Purvis.
Kevin B
PS, I myself have just begun to experiment with this, grafed a peach
to a hardy plum frame, later to be grafted to plum again. I will try
this with several peaches and plant them in different zones and see
how far north peaches might grow. (Sadly, the plum/peach union is
apparently not usually long lived, but peaches don't live that long
anyway so, we'll see)



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 6
    Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 12:27:47 -0600
    From: Lucky Pittman <Lucky.Pittman at murraystate.edu>
Subject: Pawpaws

At 05:54 AM 01/09/2002 -0600, Pete B. wrote:
 >About a year ago I found that there are pawpaws growing north of Gulfport,
 >MS in the clay hills there. (not big hills) This is about 60 miles east of
 >where we were raised. These pawpaws are on very small trees and are about
 >thumb sized to hen egg sized. I tried eating a few soft ones and they were
 >really some sorry mess. All seeds with a little bitter slime to go with
 >them.

Pete,
What you describe sounds like A.parviflora to me.  I've never knowingly
seen flag pawpaw (A.reticulata, I think) - I think it's more of a south
GA/FL species.

If you're going to attempt A.triloba down there you may be better off going
with some of the more Southern selections, like Mango(GA),  Collins(GA),
and the Duckworth(FL) series.
I don't know how chilling hours enter into the equation for the
northern/midwestern pawpaw selections, but Kirk Pomper at KYSU may have
some insight on that.



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 7
    Date: Wed, 9 Jan 2002 13:30:02 -0500 (EST)
    From: Thomas Olenio <tolenio at sentex.net>
Subject: Re: sandwiching

Hi,

What part of the tree is responsible for dormancy?  Roots or framework, or
the whole tree?  Some part of it must be sending out the hormones that
result in dormancy.

Thanks,
Tom

--


On Wed, 9 Jan 2002, edforest2010 wrote:

 > I finally found the Pomona issue and the article on sandwiching, it
 > was written by Bernie Nikolai.
 > He said that it was in BC, Canada that a felllow, Percyy Wright,
 > grafted some super hardy plums onto some peaches (so it wasn't in
 > Alaska as I'd thought), then a test winter killed all the peaches that
 > weren't grafted to the plums.
 > Percy thought that the plums caused the peaches to go dormant earlier
 > in the fall. (I wonder why he didn't theorize that it caused them to
 > leaf out later in the spring though, or at least why he ruled that
 > out)
 > Bernie goes on to say that he used the above info to try what I
 > believe he termed originally "sandwiching", or grafting a tender
 > variety onto a hardy frame and later grafting the tender variety to a
 > hardy branch tip, leaving the tender variety "sancwiched" between two
 > hardy stocks. He suggests that this might give a tender variety an
 > added protection against frost, beyond simply topworking.
 > So Bernie, have you had any success with this method?
 > The article was in issue XXV, Fall of '94, editor Bob Purvis.
 > Kevin B
 > PS, I myself have just begun to experiment with this, grafed a peach
 > to a hardy plum frame, later to be grafted to plum again. I will try
 > this with several peaches and plant them in different zones and see
 > how far north peaches might grow. (Sadly, the plum/peach union is
 > apparently not usually long lived, but peaches don't live that long
 > anyway so, we'll see)
 >
 >
 > Yahoo! Groups Sponsor
 > ADVERTISEMENT
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 > ------------------LIST GUIDELINES----------------------
 >
 > 1) Please sign your posting.  Include climate and location information if
 > relevent.
 > 2) Attached files will be stripped from your messages.  Post attachments
 > on the www.YahooGroups.com website.
 > 3) To unsubscribe send a BLANK message to
 >         nafex-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com
 > 4) Include only pertinent comments/questions when replying to a posting
 > and NOT the entire message (especially if the initial posting was large).
 >
 > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.
 >



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 8
    Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 21:45:04 -0000
    From: "fuwafuwaosagi" <fuwafuwausagi at muchomail.com>
Subject: Re: Kind of off topic; but sort of on/E-answers

Suzi Teghtmeyer wrote a whole lot of cool stuff.

I just want ot thank her for the reply.  A great use of the web as a
resource...I'll be "surfin it up naw" for hours  :)

the rabbit




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 9
    Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 21:01:18 -0500
    From: Joe Boles <jobo at istar.ca>
Subject: grafting grape vines

Hello all:
I have some Valiant grapes I do not care for and would like to change
them to Himrod and Canadice. I presume the time to cut scion wood is
now. I would like to know what grafting methods are best for changing a
grape variety and when is the best time to do the grafting. Also if
there is any special concerns when grafting grapes.
I have had good success grafting pears and apples and moderate success
with plum.
Any advise would be appreciate.

   with thanks,  Joe

Joe Boles
Mississauga, Ontario
zone 5
2 miles north of Lake Ontario




________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 10
    Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 18:50:24 -0800
    From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom at hevanet.com>
Subject: Re: grafting grape vines

Grapes don't graft like other fruits - graft them in the spring and they
will likely bleed out the graft.  Best method I know is to graft a dormant
one bud scion to a green shoot.  If you want the whole story, you can either
1).contact me directly,2).  wait until my book comes out in the fall, or
3)..
join GrapesRUs, also on Yahoogroups and look in the archives - I've posted
the method at least twice there.
-Lon Rombough
Grapes, writing, consulting, more, plus word on my grape book at
http://www.bunchgrapes.com

----------
 >From: Joe Boles <jobo at istar.ca>
 >To: "nafex at yahoogroups.com" <nafex at yahoogroups.com>
 >Subject: [nafex] grafting grape vines
 >Date: Wed, Jan 9, 2002, 6:01 PM
 >

 >Hello all:
 >I have some Valiant grapes I do not care for and would like to change
 >them to Himrod and Canadice. I presume the time to cut scion wood is
 >now. I would like to know what grafting methods are best for changing a
 >grape variety and when is the best time to do the grafting. Also if
 >there is any special concerns when grafting grapes.
 >I have had good success grafting pears and apples and moderate success
 >with plum.
 >Any advise would be appreciate.
 >
 >  with thanks,  Joe
 >
 >Joe Boles
 >Mississauga, Ontario
 >zone 5
 >2 miles north of Lake Ontario
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >------------------LIST GUIDELINES----------------------
 >
 >1) Please sign your posting.  Include climate and location information if
relevent.
 >2) Attached files will be stripped from your messages.  Post attachments 
on
 >the www.YahooGroups.com website.
 >3) To unsubscribe send a BLANK message to
 >        nafex-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com
 >4) Include only pertinent comments/questions when replying to a posting 
and
 >NOT the entire message (especially if the initial posting was large).
 >
 >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
 >
 >
 >


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 11
    Date: (unknown)
    From: Bernie Nikolai <Nikolai at v-wave.com>
Subject: Re: sandwiching, Ultra Hardy Peaches

Percy Wright was a famous horticulturist from the Canadian prairies who died
about 15 or so years ago.  What he stated was that only the peach trees that
had super hardy Saskatchewan plums grafted into the peach tree survived a
test winter in BC.  The peach trees without any Saskatchewan plum grafts
in/on them died, and he felt there was some interaction between the ultra
hardy Saskatchewan plums and the peach trees that increased hardiness of the
peach trees.  He wasn't sure, but he thought it might have to do with the
peach trees hardening off earlier.

Re sandwiching, which is grafting a tender cultivar to a hardy frame tree,
and then grafting a hardy cultivar to the end of the tender graft.  So you
might have something like Westcot apricot, Valiant peach, Westcot apricot,
all on the same branch.  Only the middle part of the branch would produce
peaches, but the sandwiching would increase the hardiness of the peaches, in
theory.  I have tried this with apples and it worked fine.  Mind you,
non-sanwiched apples topworked to a hardy stembuilder also worked.  Both
survived fully for me.  I originally intended to do this with peaches, but I
could never get the peach graft to survive the first winter in my climate so
I could "sandwich it" the following spring by grafting something very hardy
to the end of the peach graft.

I have just recently come across an apparently legitimate peach that has
been surviving and producing in Regina, Saskatchewan, zone 2B!  The mother
tree is several years old and has been producing for several years.  The
peaches are apparently of mediocre quality at best.  They would never be a
commercial variety.  Nonetheles they are peaches, and they are edible, and
they are ultra hardy.  Regina can easily hit -40C and a bit colder.  The
mother tree is apparently a seedling from a planted peach pit.  I'll try to
get a bit of scionwood this spring and graft it onto a Nanking cherry I
have.
Bernie Nikolai
Edmonton, Alberta

  06:25 PM 1/9/02 -0000, you wrote:
 >I finally found the Pomona issue and the article on sandwiching, it
 >was written by Bernie Nikolai.
 >He said that it was in BC, Canada that a felllow, Percyy Wright,
 >grafted some super hardy plums onto some peaches (so it wasn't in
 >Alaska as I'd thought), then a test winter killed all the peaches that
 >weren't grafted to the plums.
 >Percy thought that the plums caused the peaches to go dormant earlier
 >in the fall. (I wonder why he didn't theorize that it caused them to
 >leaf out later in the spring though, or at least why he ruled that
 >out)
 >Bernie goes on to say that he used the above info to try what I
 >
 >
 >------------------LIST GUIDELINES----------------------
 >
 >1) Please sign your posting.  Include climate and location information if
relevent.
 >2) Attached files will be stripped from your messages.  Post attachments 
on
the www.YahooGroups.com website.
 >3) To unsubscribe send a BLANK message to
 >        nafex-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com
 >4) Include only pertinent comments/questions when replying to a posting 
and
NOT the entire message (especially if the initial posting was large).
 >
 >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
 >
 >
 >
 >



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 12
    Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 18:53:21 -0800
    From: "Lon J. Rombough" <lonrom at hevanet.com>
Subject: Re: grafting grape vines

To join GrapesRUs, as mentioned in the other reply, go to
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/grapesrus
----------
 >From: Joe Boles <jobo at istar.ca>
 >To: "nafex at yahoogroups.com" <nafex at yahoogroups.com>
 >Subject: [nafex] grafting grape vines
 >Date: Wed, Jan 9, 2002, 6:01 PM
 >

 >Hello all:
 >I have some Valiant grapes I do not care for and would like to change
 >them to Himrod and Canadice. I presume the time to cut scion wood is
 >now. I would like to know what grafting methods are best for changing a
 >grape variety and when is the best time to do the grafting. Also if
 >there is any special concerns when grafting grapes.
 >I have had good success grafting pears and apples and moderate success
 >with plum.
 >Any advise would be appreciate.
 >
 >  with thanks,  Joe
 >
 >Joe Boles
 >Mississauga, Ontario
 >zone 5
 >2 miles north of Lake Ontario
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >------------------LIST GUIDELINES----------------------
 >
 >1) Please sign your posting.  Include climate and location information if
relevent.
 >2) Attached files will be stripped from your messages.  Post attachments 
on
 >the www.YahooGroups.com website.
 >3) To unsubscribe send a BLANK message to
 >        nafex-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com
 >4) Include only pertinent comments/questions when replying to a posting 
and
 >NOT the entire message (especially if the initial posting was large).
 >
 >Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
 >
 >
 >


________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________

Message: 13
    Date: Wed, 09 Jan 2002 22:38:22 -0500
    From: mark wessel <growyourown at earthlink.net>
Subject: Re: Re: Kind of off topic; but sort of on/E-answers

on 1/9/02 4:45 PM, fuwafuwaosagi at fuwafuwausagi at muchomail.com wrote:

 > Suzi Teghtmeyer wrote a whole lot of cool stuff.
 >
 > I just want ot thank her for the reply.  A great use of the web as a
 > resource...I'll be "surfin it up naw" for hours  :)
 >
 > the rabbit
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 >
 > ------------------LIST GUIDELINES----------------------
 >
 > 1) Please sign your posting.  Include climate and location information if
 > relevent.
 > 2) Attached files will be stripped from your messages.  Post attachments
on
 > the www.YahooGroups.com website.
 > 3) To unsubscribe send a BLANK message to
 > nafex-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com
 > 4) Include only pertinent comments/questions when replying to a posting
and
 > NOT the entire message (especially if the initial posting was large).
 >
 > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
 >
 >
Has NAFEX ever met in south florida. A few years back at the Virginia
meeting while talking of future meetings, when asked where to go in the
future , I suggested florida for the tropical aspects. Well this drew many
funny looks to say the least. I realize we are primarily intrested in the
Rosaceae family, Apples ,pears, plums. raspberries, peaches and the like and
most of us from the north may not be able to take the humid conditions of
that part of the world. I would sure like to try a mangoe fresh from the
tree.
    This brings me to my next question. I will be travelling around Costa
Rica in late Feb. Does anyone Know of any fruit growers or regions I might
visit.
      Mark   Zone 6, Ohio river valley, dreaming of mangoes, papayas,
pineapples , fruity rum drinks and lovely young ladies fanning me with palm
fronds.             Beunos noches



________________________________________________________________________
________________________________________________________________________



Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/








Gordon C. Nofs
Flint, Michigan
gc_nofs at hotmail.com


_________________________________________________________________
Chat with friends online, try MSN Messenger: http://messenger.msn.com


------------------------ Yahoo! Groups Sponsor ---------------------~-->
Tiny Wireless Camera under $80!
Order Now! FREE VCR Commander!
Click Here - Only 1 Day Left!
http://us.click.yahoo.com/WoOlbB/7.PDAA/ySSFAA/VAOolB/TM
---------------------------------------------------------------------~->





------------------LIST GUIDELINES----------------------

1) Please sign your posting.  Include climate and location information if relevent.
2) Attached files will be stripped from your messages.  Post attachments on the www.YahooGroups.com website.
3) To unsubscribe send a BLANK message to 
        nafex-unsubscribe at yahoogroups.com
4) Include only pertinent comments/questions when replying to a posting and NOT the entire message (especially if the initial posting was large). 

Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/ 





More information about the nafex mailing list