[nafex] topgrafting americana,prunus rootstocks

H.Dessureault inter.verbis at atreide.net
Tue May 15 16:21:49 EDT 2001


Beware moving this in your nursery, if you don't want to spend your time pulling roots.
Prunus virginiana has the unfortunate habit of spreading wildly from the root. It can send numerous underground shoots many feet. When you graft something on this type of prunus, it soon finds itself tighly surrounded by bushes of choke cherries. 

Prunus pennsylvanica is even worse. The later is good for prunus rootstock but it's life is short and it is easily broken so it is usually recommended that you bury the graft union underground so your variety will make it's own root. Meanwhile, it will send roots many tens of feet in all directions. The roots are bigger than prunus virginiana and far more difficult to pull. You need picks and axes. 
Both plants seems to prefer sandy soils.
On the other hand, prunus nigra, the wild plum that you find on roadsides, likes clay and has more contained growth habits.
Hélène, zone 3
  ----- Original Message ----- 
  From: del stubbs 
  To: nafex at yahoogroups.com 
  Sent: Tuesday, May 15, 2001 8:21 AM
  Subject: Re: [nafex] topgrafting americana,prunus rootstocks


  Kevin, just found the website.....
  <http://www.agt.net/public/pchenier/thesis/fruit.html>
  It mentions using  prunus nigra "Canada plum".  I haven't encountered it, 
  have you?
  It recommends prunus virginiana for super hardy rootstock....anyone out 
  there use it? I've got a forest floor covered with seeedlings and think to 
  move a bunch into nursery bed area for future grafting of plum and or evans 
  cherry. I would guess it has dwarfing characteristics. Anyone experimented 
  with it?

  Heres another good site for folks like me seeing photos of just what "green 
  tip" or "popcorn" or "silver tip" mean, from Mich. State U.

  http://www.msue.msu.edu/fruit/indexbud.htm



  >From: edforest55 at hotmail.com

  >Del,
  >Thanks for your rundown on the first and last plants to begin growth
  >this year. I always like to compare notes.
  >As for Jap/Am plums grafted on P. americana, I have some 4 year old
  >grafts at about 3 feet that haven't shown any problems yet. Probably
  >too early to tell. It might depend on the what varieties, what
  >variety was your source referring to?
  >Kevin B.
  >
  >
  _________________________________________________________________
  Get your FREE download of MSN Explorer at http://explorer.msn.com


        Yahoo! Groups Sponsor 

        ClubMom - Click Here! 
       

  Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service. 

-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/private/nafex/attachments/20010515/ec79edf9/attachment.html 


More information about the nafex mailing list