<html>
<head>
<style><!--
.hmmessage P
{
margin:0px;
padding:0px
}
body.hmmessage
{
font-size: 12pt;
font-family:Calibri
}
--></style></head>
<body class='hmmessage'><div dir='ltr'>I'll put in a quick word that a good use for high tunnels can be to grow seed crops -- one of our seed growers plants collards in the fall, harvests the leaves for market all fall/winter/early spring, then lets the plants alone once they start to flower.  So a nice dual use crop -- greens for most of the winter, and then seed production in late spring for 2-3 months when the hoophouse is heating up and space needs in there isn't as critical.  Brassicas such as collards like being able to dry down in a high tunnel -- the seed has really nice quality!<br><br>I think Pam Dawling's written about it in her Growing for Market columns, but a summer crop that be planted in high tunnels is cowpeas -- they handle heat really well, and will contribute a bit of nitrogen to the soil (though most of the nitrogen will go into the seeds).  (Nematode-resistant varieties are the best to do, after a while Pam started running into trouble with nematode buildup, so she did one of the USDA Charleston's nematode-resistant varieties, Carolina Crowder, this last summer, and said it did fine.)<br><br>(If anyone's ever interested in doing a high tunnel seed crop, feel free to drop me a line, we're always looking for more brassica growers and cowpea growers!  And probably any small seed company in your bioregion will be interested as well if you let them know.)<br><br>Ken Bezilla<br>Southern Exposure Seed Exchange<br>Mineral, VA<br>                                         </div></body>
</html>