<table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0"><tr><td valign="top"><div>With celeriac, a lot depends on the condition of the plant and on the soil temps. This time of year there should still be some warmth in the soil and I assume the celeriac still has a decent green canopy. If this is the case, the canopy should protect it from anything but a severly hard freeze. I hesitate to give you a real number, but I&#x27;ve never worried about it or had a problem with it even in mid to late november when we consitently get mid 20&#x27;s. I tend to wait as long as possible to harvest storage crops so they get as much growth as possible and so they last deeper in to the winter. <br />Another factor with your celeriac is if you have managed to keep soil from building around the roots. This, of course, makes the roots more marketable but a bit less hardy. <br />However, if I was worried about a crop, I would be harvesting deep into the night as we had to do with
 our winter squash this year when a frost was coming before I was ready. <br /><br />Aaron<br />N. Michigan</div></td></tr></table>            <div id="_origMsg_">
                <div>
                    <br />
                    <div>
                        <div style="font-size:0.9em">
                            <hr size="1">
                            <b>
                                <span style="font-weight:bold">From:</span>
                            </b>
                            Pam Twin Oaks &lt;pam@twinoaks.org&gt;;                            <br>
                            <b>
                                <span style="font-weight:bold">To:</span>
                            </b>
                            Market Farming &lt;market-farming@lists.ibiblio.org&gt;;                                                                                                     <br>
                            <b>
                                <span style="font-weight:bold">Subject:</span>
                            </b>
                            [Market-farming] cold + celery (Burke Farm)                            <br>
                            <b>
                                <span style="font-weight:bold">Sent:</span>
                            </b>
                            Thu, Oct 24, 2013 2:27:00 PM                            <br>
                        </div>
                            <br>
                            <table cellspacing="0" cellpadding="0" border="0">
                                <tbody>
                                    <tr>
                                        <td valign="top"><div dir="ltr"><div>Hi Lisa,<br><br></div>In my experience, Ventura celery with rowcover and hoops will die at 15F. Celeriac (no rowcovers) will die at 20F. <br><br>Pam<br clear="all"><div><div><br>-- <br>Pam Dawling<br> <br>
Author of Sustainable Market Farming, Intensive Vegetable Production on a Few Acres<br><a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://sustainablemarketfarming.com/">http://sustainablemarketfarming.com/</a><br><a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="https://www.facebook.com/SustainableMarketFarming">https://www.facebook.com/SustainableMarketFarming</a><br>
<a rel="nofollow" target="_blank" href="http://www.newsociety.com/Books/S/Sustainable-Market-Farming">http://www.newsociety.com/Books/S/Sustainable-Market-Farming</a><br>
</div></div></div></td>
                                    </tr>
                                </tbody>
                            </table>
                    </div>
                </div>
            </div>