<html><head></head><body style="word-wrap: break-word; -webkit-nbsp-mode: space; -webkit-line-break: after-white-space; ">Tom<div><br></div><div>You are correct. &nbsp;However, the production of charcoal at best has always been a fairly dirty process.</div><div><br></div><div>If we are talking about Biochar then we are talking about a much cleaner process. &nbsp;It is something I am looking into as an option of &nbsp;rebuilding the soil quality of a 45 acre dry gravel pit site.</div><div><br></div><div>I am way over simplifying the whole thing of course and will admit that I do not have a firm grasp on the entire thing myself. &nbsp;I can only say it looks promising especially as commercial units come on line that can produce hundreds of pounds of char in hours, ready to use.</div><div><br><div>
<span class="Apple-style-span" style="border-collapse: separate; color: rgb(0, 0, 0); font-family: Helvetica; font-size: 12px; font-style: normal; font-variant: normal; font-weight: normal; letter-spacing: normal; line-height: normal; orphans: 2; text-align: auto; text-indent: 0px; text-transform: none; white-space: normal; widows: 2; word-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-horizontal-spacing: 0px; -webkit-border-vertical-spacing: 0px; -webkit-text-decorations-in-effect: none; -webkit-text-size-adjust: auto; -webkit-text-stroke-width: 0; "><div><span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-family: Arial; "><div>Richard Stewart</div><div>Carriage House Farm</div><div>North Bend, Ohio</div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder"></div><div>An Ohio Century Farm Est. 1855</div><div><br class="khtml-block-placeholder"></div><div>(513) 967-1106</div><div><a href="http://www.carriagehousefarmllc.com">http://www.carriagehousefarmllc.com</a></div><div><a href="mailto:rstewart@zoomtown.com">rstewart@zoomtown.com</a></div></span></div><div><br></div></span><br class="Apple-interchange-newline">
</div>

<br><div><div>On Oct 26, 2009, at 1:26 PM, TMcD wrote:</div><br class="Apple-interchange-newline"><blockquote type="cite"><div><br><br>--- On Mon, 10/26/09, waldenfarm &lt;<a href="mailto:waldenfarm@bellsouth.net">waldenfarm@bellsouth.net</a>&gt; wrote:<br><br><br><blockquote type="cite">Also, burning wood for charcoal just to add to the soil<br></blockquote><blockquote type="cite">adds depletes resources and adds more CO2 to the air.<br></blockquote><br><br>If you will excuse a newcomer to the list for piping up on his first day, I think you may be mistaken about this. &nbsp;To make charcoal, wood is heated in the *absence of oxygen*, producing methanol and a host of other compounds. &nbsp;Without oxygen, I don't believe CO2 would be produced in any worrisome quantity.<br><br>Tom<br><br><br><br><br>_______________________________________________<br>Market-farming mailing list<br><a href="mailto:Market-farming@lists.ibiblio.org">Market-farming@lists.ibiblio.org</a><br>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming<br><br></div></blockquote></div><br></div></body></html>