<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META http-equiv=Content-Type content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1">
<STYLE>.hmmessage P {
        PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; MARGIN: 0px; PADDING-TOP: 0px
}
BODY.hmmessage {
        FONT-SIZE: 10pt; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana
}
</STYLE>

<META content="MSHTML 6.00.6000.16735" name=GENERATOR></HEAD>
<BODY class=hmmessage bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face="Times New Roman">Not stupid at all. First, like all cover crops 
it protects soil against erosion. It also captures free nitrogen and holds it 
into the next season. In the spring, we create tilled zones before the rye gains 
much size. Then, before planting the pumpkins, we knock the rye down to create a 
mulch mat. At that time the rye is just tillering so it constitues a lot of 
biomass and a significant mulch mat. Using a roller which crimps the rye kills 
it and helps keep it in place. The pumpkins are then planted in the tilled zone. 
Weeds are kept under control in the mulched zones and vines grow out over the 
mulch. The pumpkin fruit set and grow on top of the rye. This has a significant 
positive impact on disease development, especially fruit rots. At the end of the 
season the pumpkins are cleaner and for harvesters, whether customers or 
workers, they can move through the fields even after a rain. We've come to like 
the system very much for these reasons. Commercial growers in our area are 
beginning to implement it on a large scale.</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Times New Roman"></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV><FONT face="Times New Roman">Bill Shoemaker, Sr Research Specialist, Food 
Crops<BR>University of Illinois - St Charles Horticulture Research Center<BR><A 
href="http://www.nres.uiuc.edu/faculty/directory/shoemaker_wh.html">www.nres.uiuc.edu/faculty/directory/shoemaker_wh.html</A></FONT></DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE 
style="PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 2px solid; MARGIN-RIGHT: 0px">
  <DIV style="FONT: 10pt arial">Can I ask a stupid question?<BR><BR>What is the 
  benefit of cover cropping with the rye? Do you cover crop and then just disc 
  and till under for organic substance? Or do you use the rye for something? 
  chop and feed to animals? or just to help with the weeds during the winter 
  season?<BR><BR>Jaime<BR><BR></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>