<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<html>

<head>
<META HTTP-EQUIV="Content-Type" CONTENT="text/html; charset=us-ascii">


<meta name=Generator content="Microsoft Word 10 (filtered)">

<style>
<!--
 /* Font Definitions */
 @font-face
        {font-family:Wingdings;
        panose-1:5 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0;}
 /* Style Definitions */
 p.MsoNormal, li.MsoNormal, div.MsoNormal
        {margin:0in;
        margin-bottom:.0001pt;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman";}
a:link, span.MsoHyperlink
        {color:blue;
        text-decoration:underline;}
a:visited, span.MsoHyperlinkFollowed
        {color:#606420;
        text-decoration:underline;}
p
        {margin-right:0in;
        margin-left:0in;
        font-size:12.0pt;
        font-family:"Times New Roman";}
span.EmailStyle19
        {font-family:Arial;
        color:black;
        font-weight:normal;
        font-style:normal;
        text-decoration:none none;}
@page Section1
        {size:8.5in 11.0in;
        margin:1.0in 1.25in 1.0in 1.25in;}
div.Section1
        {page:Section1;}
 /* List Definitions */
 ol
        {margin-bottom:0in;}
ul
        {margin-bottom:0in;}
-->
</style>

</head>

<body bgcolor=white lang=EN-US link=blue vlink="#606420">

<div class=Section1>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=black face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black'>Marlin,</span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=black face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black'>Spring sown Grain Rye + vetch works well
and is inexpensive. The </span></font><font size=2 color=black face=Arial><span
  style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black'>Rye</span></font><font
size=2 color=black face=Arial><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial;
color:black'> will not form seed heads [because it hasn&#8217;t been
vernalized] and as it chokes itself out the vetch comes on. It works well 2 out
of three years for me and is better than the alternatives even in the other year.
</span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=black face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black'>David</span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=black face=Arial><span style='font-size:
  10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black'>Western</span></font><font size=2
 color=black face=Arial><span style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial;
 color:black'> </span></font><font size=2 color=black face=Arial><span
  style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black'>Mass.</span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=black face=Arial><span style='font-size:
10.0pt;font-family:Arial;color:black'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>

<div style='border:none;border-left:solid blue 1.5pt;padding:0in 0in 0in 4.0pt'>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 color=black face="Times New Roman"><span
style='font-size:10.0pt;color:black'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:
12.0pt'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>

<div>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 face=Arial><span style='font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:Arial'>While some of you are discussing equipment to till space
between plastic mulched rows I want to share some of my efforts manage this
space:&nbsp; Even if I have the right equipment I can only do limited tillage
between the rows anyway because some of my plastic mulched crops are vine crops
like squash and cucurbits that want to run into this space.</span></font></p>

</div>

<ul type=disc>
 <li class=MsoNormal><font size=2 face=Arial><span style='font-size:10.0pt;
     font-family:Arial'>Spread corn gluten meal to suppress weeds (didn't work)</span></font></li>
 <li class=MsoNormal><font size=2 face=Arial><span style='font-size:10.0pt;
     font-family:Arial'>Mulched with spoiled hay (works somewhat but is labor
     intensive and&nbsp;I have to push it off on to someone else because of my
     need to be careful with mold exposures)</span></font></li>
 <li class=MsoNormal><font size=2 face=Arial><span style='font-size:10.0pt;
     font-family:Arial'>Let the weeds grow (you can get away with it but it is
     an ugly mess I wouldn't recommend)</span></font></li>
 <li class=MsoNormal><font size=2 face=Arial><span style='font-size:10.0pt;
     font-family:Arial'>Sow crimson clover after laying the mulch (Clover came
     up ok but fizzled out with the arivval of hot weather and drought.&nbsp;
     Then came the grass and weeds.)</span></font></li>
</ul>

<div>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 face=Arial><span style='font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:Arial'>Next year I'm thinking of planting something that will grow
more aggressively in hot weather, make a thicker ground cover, feed nitrogen to
the soil, and yield some crop to those who want them--<strong><b><i><font
face=Arial><span style='font-family:Arial;font-style:italic'>cowpeas</span></font></i></b></strong>.&nbsp;
What do some of you think?&nbsp; Will it work?&nbsp; Has anyone tried it?&nbsp;
I'm not concerned about crop compitition for water and nutrients because I have
drip irrigation under the plastic, the plastic keeps competing plants far
enough away from the crop and I am prepared to foliar feed if necessary.</span></font></p>

</div>

<div>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=3 face="Times New Roman"><span style='font-size:
12.0pt'>&nbsp;</span></font></p>

</div>

<div>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 face=Arial><span style='font-size:10.0pt;
font-family:Arial'>Marlin Burkholder</span></font></p>

</div>

<div>

<p class=MsoNormal><font size=2 face=Arial><span style='font-size:10.0pt;
  font-family:Arial'>Virginia</span></font><font size=2 face=Arial><span
style='font-size:10.0pt;font-family:Arial'> zone 6</span></font></p>

</div>

</div>

</div>

</body>

</html>