<DIV>Rosie,</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>I hope you've heard of or already read Ruth Stout's books.&nbsp; If not, you'd probably find a kindred soul.&nbsp; A concept like "not watering" is nearly impossible for me here in the desert southwest, where we're lucky to get 15 inches a year.&nbsp; Normally our rainfall is 10-12 inches.&nbsp; Even then, it's "rainy" only maybe 4 months a year: July and August, and then again December and January.&nbsp; This fall, for instance, we haven't seen a drop of rain since September.</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>The only solution available to me is fairly heavy mulching (4-5 inches) and drip irrigation is *required*.&nbsp; Of course a good humus-laden soil also helps quite a bit.</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>I do have plans to build a simple rain collection and storage system to collect about half of the water I need over the course of a year.</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>So besides that, I really really like Ruth Stout's methods.&nbsp; I
 agree that "weeds" may not be as unwelcome as they've been made out to be.</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>Matt Cheselka</DIV>  <DIV>Cosmic Lettuce<BR><BR><B><I>Russ and Rosie &lt;russandrosie@comcast.net&gt;</I></B> wrote:</DIV>  <BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">I agree with the rest. This would be of intense interest to me.<BR>In case anyone is interested, here is my method (I call it the "Lazy <BR>Gardener" method):<BR>I don't weed or water. (In the Pacific NW we get enough rain) I <BR>admittedly have a small garden, but I think my method would work on a <BR>larger scale.<BR>I put down organic matter in the fall/early winter, mostly hay. Then, in <BR>the spring, I move aside any residual matter and plant. I get a lot of <BR>weeds, but they don't seem to affect the plant growth. They can be <BR>smothered with hay or knocked over out of the way or left where there are. <BR>(This is similiar to the Lasagna Method.)
 Apparently the weeds actually <BR>help out by keeping the soil loose, encouraging diverse insect life, and <BR>drawing moisture (and minerals) up from deeper in the ground. Then they <BR>provide organic material and important minerals when they decompose under a <BR>layer of hay. (Grass is an entirely different matter. Grass is not our <BR>friend.)<BR>For more information on weeds as friends see the publication "Weeds -- <BR>Guardians of the Soil" by J.A. Cocannouer.<BR>http://journeytoforever.org/farm_library/weeds/WeedsToC.html<BR>Last year I had 15 tomato plants in my greenhouse. They were the sweetest <BR>most delicious tomatoes I've grown yet. I put food scraps in a big hole, <BR>set in the plant, buried most it with dirt, surrounded them with a thick <BR>layer of straw, erected the cage, watered them once and walked away. I <BR>returned only to harvest. (My greenhouse is in a small valley, so its <BR>water table is higher than usual.)<BR>I have never had any pest or disease
 problems in the greenhouse or in the <BR>fields. I think due to the more natural way of managing the soil. Perhaps <BR>we try too hard as farmers. Maybe less is more.</BLOCKQUOTE>