<DIV>What follows is just my $.02:</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>-I'm not sure this "guru" and "newbie" hierarchy serves new farmers very well.&nbsp; There a&nbsp; million ways to farm.&nbsp; Best to find your own path, crunch the numbers, or learn from someone who is SUCCESFFULLY making a living, or at least doing what you want to do, on the ground, in your neck of the woods.&nbsp; Often glossy covered books dispense dubious advice.&nbsp; And how useful are opinions like mine, which are just the ramblings of a veg grower who's tired and feels like avoiding working in a cold drizzle this afternoon :-)</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>-I have yet to find a free lunch in farming, or actually in life in general.&nbsp; A new 25X96' greenhouse, properly constructed, costs 7-10 grand.&nbsp; A &nbsp;used one costs maybe 2-4 grand, again all costs (not just hoops, thats just the beginning...).&nbsp;&nbsp;Depending on your knowledge and the market you could gross&nbsp;5 or 10 or even 15 grand
 in that house in a year doing veg, possibly lots more with flowers.&nbsp; All the sudden a 'real' hoop house seems&nbsp;more affordable--sounds like you came to similar conclusions.</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>-The same kind of square footage spit and taped together with bent PVC or rebar or recucled whatever might cost you a few hundred .&nbsp; But it can be a false econmy because its a 'brittle' structure not likely to last long (hardware store plastic will be shot in no time!).&nbsp; And only people with pensions, trustfunds, or wealthy spouses have the luxury of not counting 'their time' to mess around with half baked greenhouses.</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>Anyways, I hope it all works out for you and wish you luck in your new venture.</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>Paul</DIV>  <DIV>Fort Hill Farm</DIV>  <DIV>New Milford, CT&nbsp; </DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>  <DIV><BR><B><I>market-farming-request@lists.ibiblio.org</I></B> wrote:</DIV> 
 <BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">Send Market-farming mailing list submissions to<BR>market-farming@lists.ibiblio.org<BR><BR>To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit<BR>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming<BR>or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to<BR>market-farming-request@lists.ibiblio.org<BR><BR>You can reach the person managing the list at<BR>market-farming-owner@lists.ibiblio.org<BR><BR>When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific<BR>than "Re: Contents of Market-farming digest..."<BR><BR><BR>Today's Topics:<BR><BR>1. HOMEGROWN HOOP HOUSE BLUES (homegrownwisdom)<BR>2. NYTimes.com: Mountains of Corn and a Sea of Farm Subsidies<BR>(nitag@ev1.net)<BR><BR><BR>----------------------------------------------------------------------<BR><BR>Message: 1<BR>Date: Wed, 9 Nov 2005 10:49:14 -0400<BR>From: "homegrownwisdom"
 <HOMEGROWNWISDOM@NS.SYMPATICO.CA><BR>Subject: [Market-farming] HOMEGROWN HOOP HOUSE BLUES<BR>To: "'Market Farming'" <MARKET-FARMING@LISTS.IBIBLIO.ORG><BR>Message-ID:<BR><MEBBLCIJICGKOOFPLEPPKECGCEAA.HOMEGROWNWISDOM@NS.SYMPATICO.CA><BR>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"<BR><BR>HOMEGROWN HOOPHOUSE BLUES: What can (and did) go wrong <BR><BR>We did all the research -- our "Four Seasons Harvest" book is so dog-eared<BR>that it won't stay closed. We endlessly googled 'hoophouse', 'hightunnel',<BR>'winter harvest' etc We scraped together the money to buy rebar, poly pipe<BR>and plastic. This fall was SHOWTIME"! We were going to build our very own<BR>hoophouse. There was so much encouragement on all those websites: words like<BR>"simple", "easy", "uncomplicated" were used. And we believed them. I should<BR>know better! <BR><BR>My partner had recycled a couple of large pieces of second-hand plastic from<BR>his spring greenhouse job. I ordered to rebar: ***LESSON #1***:Here
 is<BR>Canada, things are Metric, so there is no ? inch rebar, only 10 and 15 mm.<BR>So I went with the 10mm, which is close to 3/8 inch. A friend delivered the<BR>rebar. We were ready to go. <BR><BR>Eliot Coleman (I'll just use "EC" from now on) told us that a 20 foot piece<BR>of rebar will create a 12 foot wide hoop house that is 6 feet high at the<BR>apex. ***LESSON #2***: 20 foot long rebar is only 19 foot 6 inches long, at<BR>least here in Canada. So, in order to gain some workable height, we changed<BR>the width of the hoop house to 10 feet, which meant that one of the side<BR>beds of chard I had planted was no longer inside the hoophouse. <BR><BR>Initially we didn't have any poly pipe to cover the rebar, so at the<BR>suggestion of a friend, we used old garden and soaker hose, slit down the<BR>middle, taping it with duct tape at 18 inch intervals. It seems to work OK.<BR>***LESSON#3*** Old 1/2 inch soaker hose is very pliable and works quite well<BR>for covering the rebar. The
 plastic kind is stiffer but will also work. <BR><BR>We used rebar for the ridgepole. ***LESSON #4*** The length of the rebar<BR>determines the length of your hoop house. We're still not sure how to attach<BR>overlapping pieces of rebar in the ridegpole - would wire work wrapped in<BR>tape? We used plastic T-connectors at either end, wrapping the rebar in duct<BR>tape before pushing it into the connector and then screwing in a short screw<BR>in a pre-drilled hole. (***LESSON # 5***: Pre-drill holes in your<BR>connectors.) We covered the rebar with pieces of that foam stuff you use to<BR>insulate water pipes, tying the ridgepole to the hoops with pieces of inner<BR>tubing (EC's suggestion). <BR><BR>We laid out the recycled greenhouse plastic on a big field near our house<BR>and I set to calculating the appropriate measurements. I did them three<BR>times, like they advise and the I CUT THE WRONG DIMENSIONS! Instead of<BR>cutting the plastic to fit a 20-foot span, I cut it to 16 feet.
 Don't ask<BR>what I was thinking! ***LESSON #6***ALWAYS get someone else to check your<BR>measurements (maybe two other people, since my partner and I are not very<BR>good with measurements!). <BR><BR>So, we had to go buy 6 mil builders plastic (all we could afford). Next we<BR>put the plastic on. It wasn't a particularly windy day but it wasn't calm<BR>either). I had built two end door frames to attach the plastic to. It was a<BR>warm day, the plastic was warm and very susceptible to the least pressure. A<BR>couple of holes appeared and I had to RUN to the local nursery and spend $22<BR>on a roll of greenhouse tape. ***LESSON #7***: Have a roll of greenhouse<BR>tape on hand when you are putting the plastic on the hoop house. <BR><BR>To the best of our ability, we attached one end and then pulled the plastic<BR>tight and attached the other end. My partner then dug a trench and buried<BR>the plastic on the sides and the ends. That was last Saturday. Today is<BR>Tuesday. The wind has
 been blowing at around 60 kilometers per hour (30 mph)<BR>for you Americans. The plastic has been blowing around the frame. I can see<BR>that it has stretched since it rises about 18 inches ABOVE the ridgepole. I<BR>went inside the hoop house today and noticed that about half the hoops have<BR>been BENT away from the prevailing 60 kph wind. The hoop and door frame at<BR>the north end of the house is leaning at about a 70 degree angle toward the<BR>inside of the house (the door frame IS supported by 18 inch wooden stakes<BR>pounded into the ground and attached to the vertical pieces on both sides).<BR>Some of the hoops have also moved from their positions attached to the<BR>ridgepole and the rubber ties have come loose. <BR><BR>So I went back to the Internet to see what can be done about the plastic<BR>billowing around and have decided (unless you have a better idea), to buy<BR>some plastic baler twine to pass over each fourth hoop and stake down on<BR>each side in an attempt to keep
 the plastic down. If there is a calm day<BR>this weekend, maybe we'll dig up one whole side of the plastic and stretch<BR>it out again and re-bury it. <BR><BR>I'm not sure what to do about the leaning end hoop and door frame. Maybe<BR>some more baler twine and stakes would help here, too. I will re-tie the<BR>hoops to the ridgepole, maybe using those cable ties this time. <BR><BR>On the positive side: it was toasty warm inside the hoop house and I can<BR>already see that the plants are much happier away from the cold and wind.<BR>This is my motivation for completing the other three hoop houses (we just<BR>have to put the plastic on). With all the things that went wrong with the<BR>first hoop house, we can only improve, right? <BR><BR>It was our intention to grow greens for our 11 subscribers this winter. We<BR>followed EC's planting schedule in his "Winter Harvest Manual". However,<BR>from August to the middle of October, we had NO RAIN here and hauling water<BR>from a nearby stream
 just wasn't enough. So everything is REALLY small and<BR>not growing much (it's November 8). I really wonder if we will be able to<BR>supply our subscribers. ***LESSON #8***: Start earlier than they say. Make<BR>SURE, even if you have to grow them in containers individually, that plants<BR>like kale are mature. With other greens, next year I will start a couple of<BR>weeks earlier and sow successively, paying close attention to watering. <BR><BR>In the middle of all this, my partner and I met with a local supplier of<BR>Harnois "ColdFrame" and "OvalTech" hoop houses. They can supply a 20 X 50<BR>house for under $1,000 (Canadian). This is starting to look REALLY GOOD! <BR><BR>So, there's my rant, my "HOOP HOUSE BLUES"..I hope that it provides some<BR>useful information for any newbie like us, who, motivated and inspired by<BR>the books and articles sets out to build their own hoop houses. Maybe the<BR>inspiration and vision is what gets us through the difficulties. It's<BR>probably a
 lot like having a baby - lots of women say that if anyone had<BR>told them it would hurt that much, they NEVER would have done it. But women<BR>continue to have babies (and we continue to build hoop houses) because we<BR>are CREATING something new. <BR><BR>wendy &amp; fredr'c at <BR>WinterGreens <BR>Zone 5 Nova Scotia<BR><BR>-------------- next part --------------<BR></BLOCKQUOTE>