<DIV>
<DIV>Hi All.&nbsp; Dorene (and anyone else) - you havest leeks in the winter?&nbsp; You can leave them in the ground?&nbsp; I pulled all of mine a couple of weeks ago because they weren't looking as good as they were a couple weeks before that, stuck them in a couple inches of water in five gallon buckets, and stored in the cellar.&nbsp; But they're smelling a little funky now, and the outer layer or two is kind of mushy and needs to be peeled off.&nbsp; </DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>So, was that the wrong thing to do?&nbsp;&nbsp; Should they be left in the ground until it freezes?</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>And, I'm all over the sheet composting thing.&nbsp; Lay it on, lay it on....&nbsp; rake it off in the spring and good to go.&nbsp; The garlic seems to like the bedding coming right out of the barn, chicken poop and all.&nbsp; And it still meets the 120 day limit of the nop, far as I can tell...</DIV>
<DIV>&nbsp;</DIV>
<DIV>dave<BR><BR><B><I>market-farming-request@lists.ibiblio.org</I></B> wrote: </DIV>
<BLOCKQUOTE class=replbq style="PADDING-LEFT: 5px; MARGIN-LEFT: 5px; BORDER-LEFT: #1010ff 2px solid">Send Market-farming mailing list submissions to<BR>market-farming@lists.ibiblio.org<BR><BR>To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit<BR>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming<BR>or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to<BR>market-farming-request@lists.ibiblio.org<BR><BR>You can reach the person managing the list at<BR>market-farming-owner@lists.ibiblio.org<BR><BR>When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific<BR>than "Re: Contents of Market-farming digest..."<BR><BR><BR>Today's Topics:<BR><BR>1. anise-hyssup (william jones)<BR>2. Re: garlic spacing -- onion root maggots (Alliums)<BR>3. Re: garlic spacing -- the biannual garlic rant at Allan! ; -)<BR>(Alliums)<BR>4. Re: garlic spacing -- soil prep (Alliums)<BR>5. Re: Fwd: NY Times organics editorial (Christine &amp;
 Marlin)<BR><BR><BR>----------------------------------------------------------------------<BR><BR>Message: 1<BR>Date: Sun, 6 Nov 2005 09:11:59 -0500<BR>From: "william jones" <WILLIAMTGREAT@ZCLOUD.NET><BR>Subject: [Market-farming] anise-hyssup<BR>To: "Market Farming" <MARKET-FARMING@LISTS.IBIBLIO.ORG><BR>Message-ID: &lt;000001c5e2fa$3edd0260$98e05a42@qwandabi&gt;<BR>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"<BR><BR>November 6, 2005<BR>Trying to get a jump on next season. I raise bees. Would like to grow about<BR>1/2 acre of Anise-Hyssop. Would like suggestions on cultural practices<BR>including how to plant and space the seeds. Would like to plant the plot in<BR>sections so that the flowering season would last until frost. How far apart<BR>should the successive plantings be? How should areas that have quit<BR>flowering be handled to get a second, third or more blooming during the<BR>season? Located just east of Charlotte, NC. Thanks.<BR><BR><BR>This email scanned for Viruses and
 Spam by ZCloud.net <BR><BR><BR><BR>------------------------------<BR><BR>Message: 2<BR>Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 08:53:35 -0500<BR>From: "Alliums" <GARLICGROWER@GREEN-LOGIC.COM><BR>Subject: Re: [Market-farming] garlic spacing -- onion root maggots<BR>To: "'Market Farming'" <MARKET-FARMING@LISTS.IBIBLIO.ORG><BR>Message-ID: &lt;0IPL0047T7XFA8W0@vms048.mailsrvcs.net&gt;<BR>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii<BR><BR><BR>Hi, Folks!<BR><BR>Leigh wrote:<BR><BR>&lt;<HOWEVER <br I year last this>lost about a third of my crop due to onion root maggots. &gt;&gt;<BR><BR>I can't remember where onion root maggots come from, but my thought is that<BR>they came in from elsewhere (infested onion sets?) and attacked whatever<BR>alliums they could find.<BR><BR>Also, are you sure they were onion root maggots? I've had problems with<BR>wireworms the year after I convert any turf to a growing bed for garlic.<BR>The next year, no wireworms, but converting turf to garlic always seems to<BR>give
 problems the first year.<BR><BR>&lt;<I for <br flies the place great a was mulch suspect>to lay their eggs. What do you think? &gt;&gt;<BR><BR>I don't think it was the mulch, per say -- I think somehow you got them and<BR>they went for the available allium. <BR><BR>&lt;<THIS <br I year was thinking next>about putting down row covers in March before the last frost.&gt;&gt; <BR><BR>That seems like an awful lot of work for garlic. Are there any other<BR>controls for onion root maggots?<BR><BR>Dorene Pasekoff, Coordinator<BR>St. John's United Church of Christ Organic Community Garden and Labyrinth<BR><BR>A mission of <BR>St. John's United Church of Christ, 315 Gay Street, Phoenixville, PA 19460<BR><BR><BR><BR><BR>------------------------------<BR><BR>Message: 3<BR>Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 09:12:19 -0500<BR>From: "Alliums" <GARLICGROWER@GREEN-LOGIC.COM><BR>Subject: Re: [Market-farming] garlic spacing -- the biannual garlic<BR>rant at Allan! ; -)<BR>To: "'Market Farming'"
 <MARKET-FARMING@LISTS.IBIBLIO.ORG><BR>Message-ID: &lt;0IPL00M258SNU760@vms044.mailsrvcs.net&gt;<BR>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii<BR><BR>Hi, Folks!<BR><BR>Allan wrote:<BR><BR>&lt;<THE to <br was but, needed, unless off turned be supposed drip>apparently, a zealous intern saw the drip closed off and turned it <BR>on, so, during a dry spell in in July, the garlic, under 6inches of <BR>mulch, wound up getting an inch of water every time the lettuce <BR>needed an inch.&gt;&gt;<BR><BR><BR>Allan, Allan, Allan - I was so proud of you last year, when I didn't have to<BR>say a word about how you handled your garlic, but this year, I feel obliged<BR>to whomp down the caps lock key and say:<BR><BR>WHAT WERE YOU THINKING, ALLAN?!?!?!?!?!?!?????!!!!!!?????!!!!?????!!!!!!?<BR><BR>THOU SHALT NOT WATER THY GARLIC AFTER MAY 31TH SO THAT IT CAN DRY DOWN AND<BR>BE HARVESTED. OTHERWISE, THOU SHALT GET ROT AND PLENTY OF IT, TOO!!!!!!!<BR><BR>First off, with all that mulch, why do you need to
 water at all? In my<BR>notes to USDA, I've noticed that I haven't watered my garlic for the past 5<BR>years. As my garlic is planted on raised beds of horse stable sweepings<BR>(straw/manure mix), then covered with chopped leaves (easier to get around<BR>here than straw), I've stuck my finger in the soil and found it damp enough<BR>not to need to water.<BR><BR>Now, we've had some nasty droughts here in Southeastern PA and when it<BR>doesn't rain in June, my garlic matures fast. And when it seems that we're<BR>in for a particularly nasty July/August (like this year -- rain? What rain?<BR>:-P), the garlic seems to know and matures *very* quickly -- I've gone from<BR>harvesting through July to harvesting in mid-June to early July. But the<BR>bulbs are large and healthy, so I'm letting the garlic do what it wants to<BR>do -- and it gets it dormant and out of the ground as the rains stop, so I<BR>don't have to fuss with it and can spend the time on crops that really will<BR>die if they
 aren't watered.<BR><BR>Second of all, when are you harvesting that you're watering in June and<BR>July? Even if you're harvesting in July, why did you think it would need<BR>any water after the Summer Solstice, which is when all garlic is in its dry<BR>down phase? (I really mean this very nicely.)<BR><BR>&lt;<WE <br I but subsoil, should frankly, and, clay on are>haven't.&gt;&gt;<BR><BR>Clay is my life, and it's probably subsoil, too, since the Housing Authority<BR>sold off all the topsoil. Compost is the only reason we have crops at all.<BR>I've really found that if you give the garlic plenty of organic matter (and<BR>preferably, organic matter really, really high in nitrogen), it does fine.<BR>If you haven't subsoiled, I wouldn't worry too much as long as you're piling<BR>on the organic matter.<BR><BR>&lt;<I I suspect water. much too suspected maggots, didn?t>&gt;<BR><BR>I think that's it, too.<BR><BR>&lt;<WHAT to <br I the maggots of lifecycle study time make is do you hope>that
 are affecting garlic and then determine how to disrupt that <BR>cycle so they can be pests. And then, of course, share that <BR>information with us here.&gt;&gt;<BR><BR>I think you're right, here, too. <BR><BR>You're going to be a great garlic grower, Allan, if I have to wear out my<BR>caps lock key to do it! ;-D<BR><BR>Dorene<BR><BR>Dorene Pasekoff, Coordinator<BR>St. John's United Church of Christ Organic Community Garden and Labyrinth<BR><BR>A mission of <BR>St. John's United Church of Christ, 315 Gay Street, Phoenixville, PA 19460<BR><BR><BR><BR><BR>------------------------------<BR><BR>Message: 4<BR>Date: Mon, 07 Nov 2005 09:25:44 -0500<BR>From: "Alliums" <GARLICGROWER@GREEN-LOGIC.COM><BR>Subject: Re: [Market-farming] garlic spacing -- soil prep<BR>To: "'Market Farming'" <MARKET-FARMING@LISTS.IBIBLIO.ORG><BR>Message-ID: &lt;0IPL009TZ9F0L4O0@vms044.mailsrvcs.net&gt;<BR>Content-Type: text/plain; charset=us-ascii<BR><BR>Hi, Folks!<BR><BR>Marty wrote:<BR><BR>&lt;<I to the of space.
 urban little precious out most get ways exploring am>&gt;<BR><BR>Yes, this is my life, too -- community garden on subsoil lot behind housing<BR>project.<BR><BR>&lt;<MY <br the a leaves up chopped all provides and service lawn has neighbor>that I can use.&gt;&gt;<BR><BR>This is excellent -- your soil will love you for it.<BR><BR>&lt;<I foot <br last a of years yard with bed 18X4 an have>leaves mixed with ground alfalfa composting in a pile on that bed which <BR>I will till in very soon.&gt;&gt;<BR><BR>Ground alfalfa is good, but if you can get your hands on manure, especially<BR>this time of year so that it has time to compost down over the winter, I'd<BR>grab whatever I could get, especially for garlic.<BR><BR>If you can't get manure, I strongly suggest that you look into worm<BR>composting -- a mix of kitchen trimmings and newspaper will give you the<BR>best fertilizer possible.<BR><BR>&lt;<ABOUT I the with bed fertilizer. Bioform fertilized ago months two>&gt;<BR><BR>It's cheaper
 and probably gives a better nutrient mix to use worm castings.<BR>I strongly discourage my gardeners from using purchased fertilizers -- of<BR>course, here in Chester County, PA, we are awash in horses and each gardener<BR>has their own composter, so we have plenty of the raw materials<BR><BR>&lt;&lt; I have been told that when I till I will introduce air <BR>and the soil's nitrogen will be used as microbes eat the organic <BR>matter.&gt;&gt;<BR><BR>I'm not sure why you are tilling in KS in fall. I'd sheet composting over<BR>the winter and then till in the Spring if I was going to till. Right now,<BR>left-over Halloween pumpkins and fallen leaves are our friends in the<BR>community garden. If you're in an urban area, you ought to be able to get<BR>the materials you need, cover your soil AND replace your organic matter for<BR>the winter.<BR><BR>Cover cropping is always better, but in a small urban area, I find we're<BR>using the land until heavy frost, so there's no time for the
 cover crop to<BR>take hold. Sheet composting is an nice compromise.<BR><BR>&lt;<I to I year. every both replace had that thought>&gt;<BR><BR>There are folks who disagree with me, but if you're in an urban area with 3<BR>season production on a clay-based soil, I don't think you can add too much<BR>organic matter, especially over the winter.<BR><BR>&lt;<I'M <br the 60 above temperature soil about information how sure not>translates into what I do in the beds or when in the year I do it.&gt;&gt;<BR><BR>If the soil is below 60 degrees, the microbes aren't as efficient at<BR>converting the organic matter. However, I find that sheet composting over<BR>the winter, when all I'm doing is pulling out leeks, kale and root crops,<BR>works just fine -- although it's more "efficient" to do all your soil<BR>amending in the Spring when the soil microbes are converting everything<BR>faster, in urban areas, you have to use that soil, so being "inefficient" by<BR>providing organic matter from November
 to March when I'm not using the soil,<BR>but the microbes are only taking a bite now and then, still works better<BR>than trying to plant peas in April AND feed all those microbes. Your land,<BR>of course, may vary, but this is what works for us.<BR><BR>Hope this helps!<BR><BR>Dorene<BR><BR>Dorene Pasekoff, Coordinator<BR>St. John's United Church of Christ Organic Community Garden and Labyrinth<BR><BR>A mission of <BR>St. John's United Church of Christ, 315 Gay Street, Phoenixville, PA 19460<BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR><BR>------------------------------<BR><BR>Message: 5<BR>Date: Mon, 7 Nov 2005 09:37:00 -0500<BR>From: "Christine &amp; Marlin" <GLENECOFARM@PLANETCOMM.NET><BR>Subject: Re: [Market-farming] Fwd: NY Times organics editorial<BR>To: "'Market Farming'" <MARKET-FARMING@LISTS.IBIBLIO.ORG><BR>Message-ID: &lt;200511070942687.SM02180@GlenEcoFarm01&gt;<BR>Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"<BR><BR>LEIGH,<BR><BR>Thanks for sending the editorial. It answered some of my
 questions<BR>following a trip with Horizon.<BR><BR>I went along on a bus trip to a 600+ cow organic dairy farm in<BR>Kennedysville, MD. Horizon owns the dairy and paid for all of the expenses<BR>of the day. Horizon is owned by Dean who also owns the former Shenandoah's<BR>Pride processing plant south of Harrisonburg. Horizon would like for the 6<BR>farmers in Rockingham County who are transitioning to organic to sign up<BR>with them.<BR><BR>I am grateful to Horizon for their hospitality, but the experiences of the<BR>day disillusioned me with the "organic" label. When we got on the bus we<BR>were handed a "lunch bag" with breakfast food. The "organic" foods were 3<BR>plastic tubes of yogurt and a 1/2 cup size box of strawberry milk. What<BR>natural, synthetic free foods! <BR><BR>Christine Burkholder<BR><BR>-----Original Message-----<BR>From: market-farming-bounces@lists.ibiblio.org<BR>[mailto:market-farming-bounces@lists.ibiblio.org] On Behalf Of Leigh Hauter<BR>Sent: Friday,
 November 04, 2005 5:48 PM<BR>To: market-farming@lists.ibiblio.org<BR>Subject: [Market-farming] Fwd: NY Times organics editorial<BR><BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;November 4, 2005<BR>&gt;Editorial<BR>&gt;An Organic Drift<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;Organic food has become a very big business, with a 20 percent annual <BR>&gt;growth rate in sales in recent years. But popularity has come at a <BR>&gt;price. Ever since 2002, when the Department of Agriculture began its <BR>&gt;program of national organic certification, there has been a steady <BR>&gt;lobbying effort to weaken standards in a way that makes it easier for <BR>&gt;the giant food companies, which often use synthetic substances in <BR>&gt;processing, to enter the organic market.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;That's exactly why many organic farmers greeted the U.S.D.A.'s <BR>&gt;organic seal with real trepidation. They know that the one thing the <BR>&gt;department has always done especially well is to capitulate to the <BR>&gt;lobbying pressure of big food and
 big agriculture.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;Last week, an amendment was slipped into the agricultural spending <BR>&gt;bill without meaningful debate in a closed-door Republican meeting. <BR>&gt;It would do two things. It would overturn a court decision <BR>&gt;reinstating the old legal standard that prohibits synthetic <BR>&gt;substances in organic foods. And it would allow the agriculture <BR>&gt;secretary to approve synthetic substances if no organic substitute <BR>&gt;was commercially available.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;In part, this is a battle over a label. The big producers, which <BR>&gt;often use synthetic materials in processing, want to call their <BR>&gt;processed foods organic because that designation commands premium <BR>&gt;prices. They do not want to say their products are made with organic <BR>&gt;ingredients - a lesser designation that allows more synthetics. This <BR>&gt;is also a cultural battle, a struggle between the people who have <BR>&gt;long kept the organic faith - despite the
 historic neglect of the <BR>&gt;U.S.D.A. - and industry giants that see a rapidly expanding and <BR>&gt;highly profitable niche that can be pried open even further with <BR>&gt;lobbying.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;"Organic" is not merely a label, a variable seal of approval at the <BR>&gt;end of the processing chain. It means a way of raising crops and <BR>&gt;livestock that is better for the soil, the animals, the farmers and <BR>&gt;the consumers themselves - a radical change, in other words, from <BR>&gt;conventional agriculture. Unless consumers can be certain that those <BR>&gt;standards are strictly upheld, "organic" will become meaningless.<BR>&gt;<BR>&gt;Copyright 2005 The New York Times Company<BR>_______________________________________________<BR>Market-farming mailing list<BR>Market-farming@lists.ibiblio.org<BR>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming<BR><BR>Get the list FAQ at:
 http://www.marketfarming.net/mflistfaq.htm<BR><BR><BR><BR>------------------------------<BR><BR>_______________________________________________<BR>Market-farming mailing list<BR>Market-farming@lists.ibiblio.org<BR>http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming<BR><BR>Get the list FAQ at: http://www.marketfarming.net/mflistfaq.htm<BR><BR><BR>End of Market-farming Digest, Vol 34, Issue 6<BR>*********************************************<BR></BLOCKQUOTE></I></I></I></I></I></DIV><p>
                <hr size=1> <a href="http://us.lrd.yahoo.com/_ylc=X3oDMTFqODRtdXQ4BF9TAzMyOTc1MDIEX3MDOTY2ODgxNjkEcG9zAzEEc2VjA21haWwtZm9vdGVyBHNsawNmYw--/SIG=110oav78o/**http%3a//farechase.yahoo.com/">Yahoo! FareChase - Search multiple travel sites in one click.</a>