<HTML><FONT FACE=arial,helvetica><HTML><FONT  SIZE=2 PTSIZE=10 FAMILY="SANSSERIF" FACE="Arial" LANG="0">We really haven't experienced this very hard ground in our buildings.&nbsp; A couple of years ago we started using a ground hay mulch in them.&nbsp; After the plant emerges I start bringing in mulch and putting it around the plants.&nbsp; We keep adding mulch all the time it seems to me it will get as deep as a foot at differnt times, and as it degrades the depth changes and you have to add more.&nbsp; Holds the moisture in the ground and smothers out the weeds .&nbsp; Doesn't seem to be any more work than bedding down a hog house everyday, only difference is I don't have to carry it out and spread it.&nbsp; This time of year when the outside work is kindof put to a halt because of mother nature, I take a potato fork in the buildings and spade it up.&nbsp; In the spring(Febuary) I dig it up again and level it off.&nbsp; I usually don't have to till the beds up, whereas the winter has had enough freeze and thaw that it mellows out really nicely.&nbsp; I don't even try to grow year around in my area, I really feel that the soil needs a rest just as much as I do.&nbsp; I do have a building with brambles and strawberrys that all we do is keep drip working using the same mulch and just keep adding every year.&nbsp; We use a grandular fertilizer and add it to our mulch every six months , I like this better that trynig to regulate it through our drip system.&nbsp; Our drip system is hooked up to our greenhouse and I need a differnt formula for greenhouse than what we need for the hoophouses.<BR>
<BR>
Just some thoughts on hard ground.<BR>
We have clay loom soil.<BR>
<BR>
Phil From Iowa.</FONT></HTML>