<!doctype html public "-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en">
<html>
White flies on field grown tomatoes in NJ are rare. Using pyrethrum will
control white flies but will worsen the problem in the long run, because
pyrethrum kills all your beneficial insects that eat whiteflys. Without
the beneficials you are setting yourself up for a serious thrip and spider
mite infestation that will be far worse then whitefly. We already have
a problem with them in the southern end of the state.
<br>Try a different chemistry that protects beneficial I prefer to use
Spintor or the organic version called Entrust alternated with Azatin which
is a neem product. This combination works well on tomatoes and both are
many times less toxic than pyrethrum.
<br>Bob
<br>Sunny Meadow Farm
<br>Bridgeton, NJ.
<p>bob111higgins@comcast.net wrote:
<blockquote TYPE=CITE>&nbsp;
<p>Hi All:
<p>I now have a problem for the second time this season with serious whitefly
populations on my tomatoes -- all varieties. First time I used pyola and
water spray (pyola is canola oil with pyrethrin). I caught it earlier this
time, perhaps the next generation from the first infestation. It's been
hard to spray at the proper intervals because of all the rain. Will use
pyola again.
<p>But: in many years of home gardening, now market, I've never had whitefly
problems. I associate them with greenhouse production, not field. Any guesses
as to why? Is it the wet spells we've had in NJ? Soil deficiencies?
<p>Also, any other suggestions for control besides the oil/pyrethrin combo?
Or for a spraying regimen? Thanks.
<p>Bob, Red Brick Farm, Hopewell
<pre>
<hr WIDTH="90%" SIZE=4>_______________________________________________
Market-farming mailing list
Market-farming@lists.ibiblio.org
<a href="http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming">http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming

</a>Get the list FAQ at: <a href="http://www.marketfarming.net/mflistfaq.htm">http://www.marketfarming.net/mflistfaq.htm</a></pre>
</blockquote>
</html>