<!DOCTYPE HTML PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.0 Transitional//EN">
<HTML><HEAD>
<META content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" http-equiv=Content-Type>
<META content="MSHTML 5.00.2919.6307" name=GENERATOR>
<STYLE></STYLE>
</HEAD>
<BODY bgColor=#ffffff>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>Finite Resources - here are some more thoughts on 
the energy additions <BR>that Avery advocates.&nbsp; One must remember that 
petroleum is heavily <BR>subsidized by the government as well, both in research 
and exploration, <BR>as well as in our current series of wars - which are 
incredibly <BR>expensive.&nbsp; Since conventional ag is a large user of 
petroleum products <BR>in its pesticides and fertilizers, to claim that such a 
dependence is <BR>more sustainable than organic farming is ludicrous at 
best.<BR>Predictions of peak oil production range from already having occurred 
to <BR>5 years to 20 years. According to an article by Mike Duffy, "Prices on 
<BR>the Rise: How will higher energy costs impact farmers?", energy expenses 
<BR>for fuel, fertilizers and pesticides, added up to 16 percent of total 
<BR>farm expenditures in 1998 - with 2.6% for fuel, 7% for fertilizers, and 
<BR>6.5% for pesticides. This causes the cost of production to rise. 
<BR>According to the US Department of Energy, agriculture is one of the 9 
<BR>top energy-intensive industries in the United States (April 2, 
2002).<BR><BR>"Natural gas is the primary cost component in producing nitrogen 
<BR>fertilizers. Since experiencing a record high natural gas price at $9.00 
<BR>per MMBtu in January 2001, natural gas cost has accounted or about 92 
<BR>percent of the cost of ammonia production. Without a sharp increase in 
<BR>nitrogen fertilizer prices, , the higher natural gas price creates 
<BR>significant pressure for nitrogen fertilizer producers to curtail 
<BR>production." (Economic Analysis of the Changing Structure of the U.S. 
<BR>Fertilizer Industry C.S. Im, H. Taylor, C. Hallahan, and G. Schaible, 
<BR>Economic Research Service, USDA)<BR><BR>"Reliable estimates from the 
Department of Energy show that 5 pounds of <BR>nitrogen have the energy 
equivalent of a gallon of diesel fuel, in other <BR>words, 100 pounds of 
nitrogen fertilizer would have the energy of 20 <BR>gallons of diesel fuel." 
(Prices on the Rise, p 1-2))</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2><BR>"Pesticides are made from petroleum. The exact 
amount depends on the <BR>product. A common measure used is that it takes the 
equivalent of a <BR>gallon of diesel fuel to make one pound of active ingredient 
of <BR>pesticides." (Prices on the Rise, p. 2)</FONT></DIV>
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; 
&nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; &nbsp;&nbsp;&nbsp; - Jill<BR></DIV></FONT></BODY></HTML>