<html>
At 07:23 AM 2000-12-24 -0600, you wrote:<br>
<blockquote type=cite cite>By these rules would I be prohibited from
posting a sign that says, &quot;The<br>
vegetables and herbs from our farm are growning using organic
methods.&nbsp; No<br>
pesticides, herbicides or chemical fertilizers were used to grow 
our<br>
produce.&quot;<br>
<br>
For small growers I am not sure why certification was ever worth the
cost.<br>
If you're selling to other countries or to large retail outlets,
OK.&nbsp; But<br>
for a grower who deals directly with customers and lives
geographically<br>
close, what is the point of spending the extra money?<br>
<br>
Del Williams<br>
Farmer in the Del<br>
Clifton, Illinois/USA<br>
</blockquote><br>
I don't know if you would be prohibited from using that signage, but I do
think you would have a first amendment case on your hands if you
were.&nbsp; We use that language frequently in our promotional literature
since our farm is in transition.<br>
<br>
Certification is a marketing tool.&nbsp; That is all it is.&nbsp;
Depending on your definition of &quot;small grower&quot;, it may or may
not be worth the cost.&nbsp; However, I would point out that even dealing
with smaller retail outlets, such as your local food coop, certification
provides at least <i>some</i> level of reassurance to your
customers.&nbsp; Although most of our local food coops managers are part
of a homeschooling group to which we belong, and regularly visit our farm
as part of our educational exchanges, none of them have ever taken
opportunity to talk to us about our farming methods, soil management, or
pest or weed control.&nbsp; So the customers of said coop should in no
way be assuming that local food sold through the coop is anything like
what they should expect from &quot;organic&quot; food.<br>
<br>
When I sold produce in California in the early 1990's, we put a lot of
effort into educating our customers about the value of
certification.&nbsp; There was a lot of non-certified produce on the
market at the time, but our customers appreciated the fact that, if
nothing else, our farm had had to put a lot of effort into thinking about
our farm operation for the certification application, and opened the farm
to inspection by somebody trained to look for potential problems.<br>
<br>
I would also note that many growers do not themselves know the meaning of
&quot;organic&quot;.&nbsp; At the big-city farmers market we attend now
(Rochester, MN), a neighboring livestock producer sold his meats as
&quot;organic&quot; because he didn't medicate them, although he fed them
plenty of conventional grains.&nbsp; Many of our corn-and-bean neighbors
think that if they don't use pesticides, that makes their product
organic.&nbsp; When a customer asks if <i>our </i>farm is organic, I look
forward to being able to respond that our produce has been certified by
an independent, third party as organic.<br>
<br>
(We are not certified at this time because the land we farm on was in
chemical corn and beans before we bought it; hence the &quot;we use
organic methods&quot; line.)<br>
<br>
I will note here that I wish the USDA had stayed out of it all
together.<br>
<br>
Best regards,<br>
<br>
Chris<br>
<br>
<br>

<hr>
<b>Rock Spring Farm<br>
</b>Chris and Kim Blanchard<br>
3765 Highlandville Road<br>
Spring Grove, MN&nbsp; 55974<br>
319-735-5613<br>
Fax: 319-735-5374<br>
<font face="Times New Roman, Times" size=4>realfood@RSFarm.com</font></html>