<html>
Regards to the list:<br>
<br>
Friday, we finished planting garlic here in north central Missouri.&nbsp;
It was snowing as the last of the cloves were shoved into the soft dirt
and covered up.&nbsp; The plowed ground had finally dried up enough from
the last rain and we were able to bring the disk and tiller in to ready
the bed.&nbsp; We've never had good garlic grow here before but this time
we got the garlic from a nearby farmer.&nbsp; We have high hopes for
this.<br>
<br>
Also, we finally were able to dig the sweet potatoes and most of them
were ruined from the freeze.&nbsp; The ones deepest in the ground were
fine but the others began rotting soon after they hit the air.&nbsp; The
chickens have certainly enjoyed them.<br>
<br>
Speaking of chickens, I want to relate a true story.&nbsp;&nbsp;
<font size=3>Last week, a possum got into the chicken house and killed
one of the young chickens. Hubby shot the possum.&nbsp; What a terrible
creature - he had fangs.&nbsp; How we found out about the possum was so
strange. It was almost dark and&nbsp; I was sitting at the dining room
table, reading the paper when the gray rooster (the mean one that tore a
hole in one of my socks) flew up and beat his wings against the
window.&nbsp; That was unusual because ordinarily, he would be on his
roost asleep by then and no chicken around here had even done anything
like that before.&nbsp; I was alarmed by this so Hubby&nbsp; put on his
boots and coat and went outside to check, came back for the rifle and so
on.&nbsp; The possum wasn't in the house where the gray rooster lives -
he was in the other one.&nbsp; So, now, when the gray rooster comes to
the porch and crows repeatedly, we go outside and check everything.&nbsp;
I never thought we would have a watch chicken.<br>
<br>
The Monday after Thanksgiving, we adopted a beautiful female Great
Pyrenees who grew up in the city.&nbsp; She is making herself right at
home here and we hope she will keep the varmints away for us.&nbsp; She
mostly ignores the chickens except to sniff their behinds now and then,
which they hate, but we think we can live with it.&nbsp; Things are
looking up in north central Missouri.<br>
<br>
Marie in Missouri<br>
</font></html>