[Market-farming] Holding Down Row Cover

clearviewfarm at bluefrog.com clearviewfarm at bluefrog.com
Sun May 6 09:52:57 EDT 2012


The ones I use, 6 mil black plastic, are about 30% of what you pay.  I haven't used them long enough to know the life expectancy with sand or dirt in them, but I do know that stones inside shorten their life noticeably.  $1.25 a piece might not be so bad if you consider the labor involved to fill them...only once every 7 years versus half that or whatever and less disposal headache.

Kurt Forman
Clearview Farm
Palmyra, NY 14522
Knowledge is knowing a tomato is a fruit. Wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad.

--- etienne at lejardinduvillage.ca wrote:

From: Etienne Goyer <etienne at lejardinduvillage.ca>
To: Market Farming <market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: Re: [Market-farming] Holding Down Row Cover
Date: Sun, 06 May 2012 07:33:19 -0400

Dubois Agrinov has bags made specially for holding down row cover:

http://www.duboisag.com/en/floating-row-covers/accessories/floating-row-cover-bags/bag-with-handle-for-row-cover-row-bag.html

I bought a box of them.  They work wonderfully well.  But at 1.25$/bag,
they are mighty expensive.  They are supposed to last 7 year, though.



On 12-05-05 09:16 AM, Richard Robinson wrote:
> On 5/5/2012 at 9:00:22 AM, andrea davis wrote:
>> How have people found is the best way to hold down row cover?  In the past I
>> have put dirt on it but then it is always a pain to remove it when things
>> need to be checked on.  I heard something about laying rebar on the edges.
> 
> I have tried rebar a couple times, but the rust on the bar grabbed the fuzz on the row cover, and wouldn't release easily. Stones work fine, but are variably sized and have no handles, making them somewhat of a pain to repeatedly move for inspection under the cover. Milk jugs with smaller stones in them (cut out on the side for filling, and with drain holes in the bottom) work well but have two problems: you need a generous amount of fabric on the ground underneath them for best holding power, since they exert no lateral force (unlike a sandbag) on the cover, and are likely themselves to be tipped over in a strong wind by the fabric pushing up on them; and they break down pretty quickly, and need replacing every year. I am trying small sandbags this year (10"x14", with ties) and can see their benefits. The tied top provides a handle, and they will lean into the vertical face of the fabric against a hoop, both holding the fabric and making the bag itself very hard to blow over
>   in the wind.
> 
> 
>   Richard Robinson
>   www.nasw.org/users/rrobinson/
>   Hopestill Farm
>   www.hopestill.com
> 
> 
> _______________________________________________
> Market-farming mailing list
> Market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming
> 
> Market Farming List Archives may be found here:
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/market-farming/
> Unsubscribe from the list here (you will need to login in with your email 
> address and password):
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/options/market-farming

-- 
Etienne Goyer  -  Le Jardin du Village
http://lejardinduvillage.wordpress.com

"Changer le monde, une betterave à la fois"

_______________________________________________
Market-farming mailing list
Market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming

Market Farming List Archives may be found here:
http://lists.ibiblio.org/pipermail/market-farming/
Unsubscribe from the list here (you will need to login in with your email 
address and password):
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/options/market-farming




_____________________________________________________________
This message was delivered by BlueFrog.com. For the best email, please visit http://www.bluefrog.com

If you believe this message is spam, please report to abuse at bluefrog.com.


More information about the Market-farming mailing list