[Market-farming] Fruit Set Temperatures

Allan Balliett allan.balliett at gmail.com
Mon Aug 6 06:52:38 EDT 2012


Here are some notes/references on the effect of temps on fruit set I
gathered. It will take me forever to get out of my head that beans
want it as hot as possible. (well, same for eggplant and sweet
peppers, I guess....;-) but it looks like my 'instincts' are dead
wrong! -Allan in WV

Green Beans
from Henry G. Taber, Extension Vegetable Specialist, Iowa State University
www.public.iastate.edu/~taber/Extension/Green%20Beans.pdf

"...optimum growth of the bean plant and yield occurs between 65 and
85degrees F. There are usually problems with production if the mean
temperature is greater than 85F. High temperature interferes with
pollination, resulting in blossom drop, crooked or deformed pods due
to the lack of ovule development. ... When daytime temperatures turn
cooler new flowers form which set new pods."

Eggplant
from University of AZ Cooperative Extension
http://ag.arizona.edu/maricopa/garden/html/pubs/0203/eggplant.html

"The optimum daytime growing temperature ranges between 70°F and 85°F.
When temperatures rise above 95°F, eggplant ceases to set fruit and
may drop flowers or abort immature fruit. Fruit set is also reduced
when temperatures fall below 60°F. "

Sweet Peppers / Tomatoes
from Texas A&M AgriLife Extension "Aggie Horticulture"
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/archives/parsons/vegetables/pepper.html

"Peppers, like tomatoes, are sensitive to temperature. Most peppers
will drop their blooms when daytime temperatures get much above 90
degrees F. in combination with night temperatures above 75 degrees F.
They will also drop their blooms in the early spring if temperatures
remain cool for extended periods. Hot peppers, such as jalapenos,
withstand hot weather fairly well and can often produce fruit through
the summer in most areas. Optimum temperatures fall between 70 degrees
and 80 degrees F. for bell-type peppers and between 70 degrees and 85
degrees F. for hot varieties."


More information about the Market-farming mailing list