[Market-farming] Squash bug control

barbara.dieckman at gmail.com barbara.dieckman at gmail.com
Sat Oct 31 15:14:41 EDT 2009


S happens?
Sent from my Verizon Wireless BlackBerry

-----Original Message-----
From: "Wiener, Benjamin L CPT NG NG FORSCOM" <benjamin.l.wiener at us.army.mil>
Date: Sat, 31 Oct 2009 20:38:06 
To: Market Farming<market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
Cc: Market Farming<market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org>
Subject: Re: [Market-farming] Squash bug control

One of the reasons I will never be certified organic is the sheer stupidity of some of the rules.  If guinea fowl cannot be used because of the tiny ammount of droppings they would leave, then what do organic growers do to exclude wild birds that already deposit droppings in the field?  There is a huge difference in quantity between applying manure for fertility and using a natural method of bug control.  You can't even use manure from animals that recieve adequate veterinary care.  What a bunch of BS (pun intended).   

Ben Wiener

> (Guinea fowl actually probably wouldn't meet current organic 
> standards: 
> they'd be depositing fresh manure in the field, and to do the job 
> they'd probably have to be in there within the 120 days before 
> harvest 
> -- fresh manure can't be applied within 120 days of harvest of a 
> crop 
> for human consumption if the part of the plant for consumption can 
> touch the ground. You could put them in the field after harvest to 
> clean up, of course; that might reduce next year's pest pressure 
> significantly.)
> 
> -- Rivka; Finger Lakes NY, Zone 5 mostly
> Fresh-market organic produce, small scale
> 
> 
> On Oct 31, 2009, at 9:27 AM, Diane Kunkel wrote:
> 
> 
> <Hi, Do any of you use Guinea Fowl for squash bug control?
> I've almost 
> 
> given up on squash & pumpkins. Or are there any organic controls for 
> 
> these little devils? Thanks,  Andy   zone 5-6  Wenatchee, WA
> 
> 
> <
> 
> I've found a lot of varietal difference in susceptibility to squash
> bugs -- in particular, I've found buttercups and kabocha types (of
> various varieties) to be much more susceptible to them than acorn,
> delicata/sweet dumpling, and butternut types. I haven't researched
> other organic controls -- I think there are some -- because I rarely
> have significant problems with the resistant types.
> 
> 
> On the other hand, I've never had much problem with squash bugs in
> pumpkins; so it's possible our squash bugs don't have the same tastes
> as yours.
> 
> 
> (Guinea fowl actually probably wouldn't meet current organic
> standards: they'd be depositing fresh manure in the field, and to do
> the job they'd probably have to be in there within the 120 days before
> harvest -- fresh manure can't be applied within 120 days of harvest of
> a crop for human consumption if the part of the plant for consumption
> can touch the ground. You could put them in the field after harvest to
> clean up, of course; that might reduce next year's pest pressure
> significantly.)
> 
> 
> <-- Rivka; Finger Lakes NY, Zone 5 mostly
> 
> Fresh-market organic produce, small scale<
> _______________________________________________
> Market-farming mailing list
> Market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
> http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming
> 
_______________________________________________
Market-farming mailing list
Market-farming at lists.ibiblio.org
http://lists.ibiblio.org/mailman/listinfo/market-farming



More information about the Market-farming mailing list